% of Americans for Gay Marriage

Long story short:
I was discussing politics with someone at a bar (really bad decision) and we were talking about gay rights (talking politics at a bar about something inherently personal...even worse decision).

In the end, he brought up that around 80% of Americans are for gay marriage while I pointed out numerous polls that said the number was closer to 53% (CNN for one, but the one I always reference is 538.com).

I was just wondering if anyone has come across the number of 80% when it comes to this issue and what were the parameters (math geek here who still can't find anything close).

I really don't have strong feelings about gay marriage one way or another. It's safe to say that I'm not going to be on any steps holding a picket sign for either side of the cause anytime soon. It doesn't affect me one way or another. I simply don't care. It's not my fight and I am happy as can be to sit on the sidelines as a spectator with no rooting interest.

That being said there are a few things about this that I think sometimes are unaccounted for by some people. Firstly, gay rights is not an issue that any significant number of Americans are using to make decisions at the ballot box. In fact, in recent polling inquiring about important issues facing America gay rights finished second to last only ahead of school shootings. So while a majority of Americans are happy to pay it lip service there are far less that are willing to go beyond that.

Also, in many social circles it is infinitely more socially convenient to claim to support gay marriage than it is to claim apathy towards the issue or, even worse, oppose it. There are no small number of people out there ready and willing to label anyone who isn't 100% behind gay marriage as some kind of bigot. The long and short of it is that it's a hell of a lot less hassle to be publicly for gay marriage. The 20 seconds it takes to change your Facebook avatar or sign a petition or whatnot is probably worth the headache it prevents to a lot of people.

I don't dispute that likely the majority of Americans support gay marriage. However, I would argue that a good many of those people support it in the "Yeah. Sure. Great. Whatever. Can I go now?" kind of way. The issue is simply one that personally affects a very small portion of Americans. As such it's not an important issue to a lot of those people who are unaffected by it even though it may or may not be an important issue in the big scheme of things. I think to get a clearer picture we shouldn't look at how many people support it so much as we should look at how strongly those that do support it actually feel about it.

Yeah, most people are for gay rights in a vague abstract way, but many of those are quite happy to see gay people be oppressed in reality.

81% of 18-29 people support gay marriage.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Public_opinion_of_same-sex_marriage_in_the_United_States

Though I wouldn't be suprised if in the next decade the total support goes up to 60-65%. The 65 and older category begin to die off, more new generations entering the public voice, and people changing their mind. Interesting fact, a poll that 53% of american support gay marriage, 33% of those changed their mind from not supporting to supporting in recent years.

dmase:
81% of 18-29 people support gay marriage.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Public_opinion_of_same-sex_marriage_in_the_United_States

Though I wouldn't be suprised if in the next decade the total support goes up to 60-65%. The 65 and older category begin to die off, more new generations entering the public voice, and people changing their mind. Interesting fact, a poll that 53% of american support gay marriage, 33% of those changed their mind from not supporting to supporting in recent years.

Yeah. It may only be slightly over 50% now, and less than 50% in the South, but the younger generation even in the deep south is far more receptive to the idea than the older generation. There will always be people who don't like gays, just as there are still and will always be people who don't like non-whites, but it's clear this will quickly become a non-issue for the vast majority of Americans.

It's definitely why Republicans are so quickly changing their tune on the issue. While several are still willing to fight to the last in front of the Supreme Court, it's very clearly a sinking ship they need to bail themselves out of quickly if they want to win back voters by 2016.

In other news, God I hate that so many are already talking about 2016. Let's take at least a year off before getting all excited about the next Presidential election, please? For all of our sakes.

KEM10:
Long story short:
I was discussing politics with someone at a bar (really bad decision) and we were talking about gay rights (talking politics at a bar about something inherently personal...even worse decision).

In the end, he brought up that around 80% of Americans are for gay marriage while I pointed out numerous polls that said the number was closer to 53% (CNN for one, but the one I always reference is 538.com).

I was just wondering if anyone has come across the number of 80% when it comes to this issue and what were the parameters (math geek here who still can't find anything close).

A large part of it is who you're asking and how they're counting. One somewhat dishonest tactic I've seen is where pollsters can get vastly different results by asking questions in misleading ways (if the questioner misleads the people taking the poll by suggesting that churches will be forced to perform gay marriages, which has never been true or on the table, then support drops), or if the pollster separates the categories then only reports on a partial answer (such as having "Yes, No and Buttered Toast" being responses and lumping everybody that answered "No" and "Toast" as "Against Yes").

I see arguments where anti-equality people will list an entire spectrum of different types of marriage licenses then only count the '100% support' group as 'Yes' and count everybody else as 'No' even if they're for some form of gay marriage, then take that as some sort of sign people are against gay marriage. For example, if you split 'Yes' up into 'Yes', 'Yes, but...' and so forth, then suddenly support 'dwindles' by their numbers even though nobody supports it any less in reality.

It's no where close to around 80%, I wouldn't even go so far as to say it's 50% either. It depends on what state you are in perhaps, but even in many of the most liberal states (such as California) gay marriage support is pretty low.

I think this issue could be solved easily simply by giving gay couples the same legal benefits. It's only when they want to refer to it as marriage do people start to draw the line, and contrary to popular myth on this forum, many of those people are not homophobic bigots at all.

But I know how people on here like to group together and beat up on the guy who voices the different opinion (which is hypocrytical considering many of these same people like to brag about how "tolerant" and "open minded" they are to different views), so I'm just going to leave it at this.

Super Not Cosmo:
I really don't have strong feelings about gay marriage one way or another. It's safe to say that I'm not going to be on any steps holding a picket sign for either side of the cause anytime soon. It doesn't affect me one way or another. I simply don't care. It's not my fight and I am happy as can be to sit on the sidelines as a spectator with no rooting interest.

That being said there are a few things about this that I think sometimes are unaccounted for by some people. Firstly, gay rights is not an issue that any significant number of Americans are using to make decisions at the ballot box. In fact, in recent polling inquiring about important issues facing America gay rights finished second to last only ahead of school shootings. So while a majority of Americans are happy to pay it lip service there are far less that are willing to go beyond that.

Also, in many social circles it is infinitely more socially convenient to claim to support gay marriage than it is to claim apathy towards the issue or, even worse, oppose it. There are no small number of people out there ready and willing to label anyone who isn't 100% behind gay marriage as some kind of bigot. The long and short of it is that it's a hell of a lot less hassle to be publicly for gay marriage. The 20 seconds it takes to change your Facebook avatar or sign a petition or whatnot is probably worth the headache it prevents to a lot of people.

I don't dispute that likely the majority of Americans support gay marriage. However, I would argue that a good many of those people support it in the "Yeah. Sure. Great. Whatever. Can I go now?" kind of way. The issue is simply one that personally affects a very small portion of Americans. As such it's not an important issue to a lot of those people who are unaffected by it even though it may or may not be an important issue in the big scheme of things. I think to get a clearer picture we shouldn't look at how many people support it so much as we should look at how strongly those that do support it actually feel about it.

Same here. As whose going to get a cup of coffee with his or her friends, and say hey lets arrest those gays for marrying if the topic is brought up. The only people that seem to care are those who are gay, and a bunch if religionist people.

The support level for full marriage equality is around 50%, give or take. If you include civil unions in the equation and ask instead whether people support legal gay unions of some kind support reaches about 70%, though this can vary quite widely from state to state. Among those under 30 I think the figure of support for full marriage equality is 70-80%. Your friend could have either been talking about that or the civil union thing, or he could have just been mistaken.

TheLycanKing144:
I think this issue could be solved easily simply by giving gay couples the same legal benefits. It's only when they want to refer to it as marriage do people start to draw the line, and contrary to popular myth on this forum, many of those people are not homophobic bigots at all.

Complete bullshit. If this is true then why do most American states have either laws or constitutional amendments that ban civil unions?

TheLycanKing144:
It's no where close to around 80%, I wouldn't even go so far as to say it's 50% either. It depends on what state you are in perhaps, but even in many of the most liberal states (such as California) gay marriage support is pretty low.

I think this issue could be solved easily simply by giving gay couples the same legal benefits. It's only when they want to refer to it as marriage do people start to draw the line, and contrary to popular myth on this forum, many of those people are not homophobic bigots at all.

But I know how people on here like to group together and beat up on the guy who voices the different opinion (which is hypocrytical considering many of these same people like to brag about how "tolerant" and "open minded" they are to different views), so I'm just going to leave it at this.

"Blacks just shouldn't marry whites! It's just my opinion, though, so if you disagree, don't paint me as a bigot or any such accurate designation! That would be INTOLERANT."

TheLycanKing144:
It's no where close to around 80%, I wouldn't even go so far as to say it's 50% either. It depends on what state you are in perhaps, but even in many of the most liberal states (such as California) gay marriage support is pretty low.

Except that is wrong. As others have said, recent polling has shown that 80% of people between the ages of 18 and 29 support gay marriage. So where is your research that tells you otherwise and allows you to dismiss actual evidence? I'm sure I can find you multiple polls that show that acceptance of gay marriage is somewhere around 57% with people against gay marriage making up roughly 33% with 10% having no position, and if you can provide me with even one relevant study that backs you up, I'll actually go find far more that support my claim.

I think this issue could be solved easily simply by giving gay couples the same legal benefits. It's only when they want to refer to it as marriage do people start to draw the line, and contrary to popular myth on this forum, many of those people are not homophobic bigots at all.

Except then we get into the whole separate but equal conundrum. Even if you just say that domestic partnerships are equivalent to marriage, you are still say that it isn't marriage, and thus you have the implication that it is inferior to straight marriage.

But I know how people on here like to group together and beat up on the guy who voices the different opinion (which is hypocritical considering many of these same people like to brag about how "tolerant" and "open minded" they are to different views), so I'm just going to leave it at this.

So, see, we like to beat up people who voice opinions which are contrary to the evidence. I'm not responding to tell you you are wrong because your views are conservative and thus incorrect, I'm quoting you because what you're saying is wrong because all the evidence as far as popular support for gay marriage is the opposite of what you're claiming it to be.

TheLycanKing144:
It's no where close to around 80%, I wouldn't even go so far as to say it's 50% either. It depends on what state you are in perhaps, but even in many of the most liberal states (such as California) gay marriage support is pretty low.

I'm basically an animist though my kinfolk are Christians. I live in the Southeast--the bible belt of the USA--and the percentages of people supporting or abhorring same-sex marriage is thoroughly grounded in the generation gap. Nationwide the poles are consistently just over 50% in support and just a few points lower against it. The 18-30 year old figures are solidly in support pro same sex. Even the GOP's leadership is quoting the numbers--heck, Rush Limbaugh is too!--so there's not a lot of grey area concerning the statistics and the differences between differences in generations' opinions.

TheLycanKing144:
I think this issue could be solved easily simply by giving gay couples the same legal benefits. It's only when they want to refer to it as marriage do people start to draw the line, and contrary to popular myth on this forum, many of those people are not homophobic bigots at all.

There is some truth to this. I've known plenty of people around here who's focus on such issues are whether such subjects jive with what they were taught and grew up with in church. Abortions, sexuality, whether their particular church/denomination approves of drinking alcohol or not--gay marriage just gets lumped into the rest of the package. It's a part of how they perceive/define Life-the Universe-and Everything.

TheLycanKing144:

But I know how people on here like to group together and beat up on the guy who voices the different opinion (which is hypocrytical considering many of these same people like to brag about how "tolerant" and "open minded" they are to different views), so I'm just going to leave it at this.

Kaulen Fuhs:

"Blacks just shouldn't marry whites! It's just my opinion, though, so if you disagree, don't paint me as a bigot or any such accurate designation! That would be INTOLERANT."

It's been made very clear at the highest levels of the Escapist that Mods aren't "Thought Police" but are here to ensure that posters stay within the rules no matter whether we agree/disagree with what people are saying.

Kaulen Fuhs, whether you or I agree/disagree with TheLycanKing144 I was assigned to moderate R&P to calm things down and induce civility into this forum. TheLycanKing144 does have a right to his opinion just as you do.

As the old die off, this issue will be fully resolved. It's as simple as that, really. The % in favour will continue to climb over the next couple of years, so even if the rulings in the Supreme Court are not in favour of homosexuals, it won't matter in the mid- to long-term. As for the exact numbers, I wouldn't be surprised if - like some have suggested in this thread - it was referring to a younger segment rather than the populace as a whole. But see above, many of the older segments will be gone in a decade or two. Of course, that doesn't mean it wouldn't be good if the issue was resolved sooner rather than later, but at least there's hope for homosexuals who are currently in trouble...

Skeleon:
As the old die off, this issue will be fully resolved. It's as simple as that, really. The % in favour will continue to climb over the next couple of years, so even if the rulings in the Supreme Court are not in favour of homosexuals, it won't matter in the mid- to long-term. As for the exact numbers, I wouldn't be surprised if - like some have suggested in this thread - it was referring to a younger segment rather than the populace as a whole. But see above, many of the older segments will be gone in a decade or two. Of course, that doesn't mean it wouldn't be good if the issue was resolved sooner rather than later, but at least there's hope for homosexuals who are currently in trouble...

This. This exact effect is why I always tell my stoner friends not to worry too much about legalization; as the boomers die and Gen X and Y assume more political power, mainstream American politics (at least with regards to social issues) are gonna take a HARD left turn.

thefrizzlefry:

Skeleon:
As the old die off, this issue will be fully resolved. It's as simple as that, really. The % in favour will continue to climb over the next couple of years, so even if the rulings in the Supreme Court are not in favour of homosexuals, it won't matter in the mid- to long-term. As for the exact numbers, I wouldn't be surprised if - like some have suggested in this thread - it was referring to a younger segment rather than the populace as a whole. But see above, many of the older segments will be gone in a decade or two. Of course, that doesn't mean it wouldn't be good if the issue was resolved sooner rather than later, but at least there's hope for homosexuals who are currently in trouble...

This. This exact effect is why I always tell my stoner friends not to worry too much about legalization; as the boomers die and Gen X and Y assume more political power, mainstream American politics (at least with regards to social issues) are gonna take a HARD left turn.

Well, a hard left by American standards. Which by the rest of the world's standards would just be a slight nudge toward the center. America has a long way to go before any of its actions are "left" enough to appear "left" on a global scale. Right now the American left is a joke to everyone else, and the American right is somewhere close to theocracy or corporate fascism.

Copper Zen:

TheLycanKing144:

But I know how people on here like to group together and beat up on the guy who voices the different opinion (which is hypocrytical considering many of these same people like to brag about how "tolerant" and "open minded" they are to different views), so I'm just going to leave it at this.

Kaulen Fuhs:

"Blacks just shouldn't marry whites! It's just my opinion, though, so if you disagree, don't paint me as a bigot or any such accurate designation! That would be INTOLERANT."

It's been made very clear at the highest levels of the Escapist that Mods aren't "Thought Police" but are here to ensure that posters stay within the rules no matter whether we agree/disagree with what people are saying.

Kaulen Fuhs, whether you or I agree/disagree with TheLycanKing144 I was assigned to moderate R&P to calm things down and induce civility into this forum. TheLycanKing144 does have a right to his opinion just as you do.

I don't think anyone is trying to deny him his "right" to an opinion. He can hold whatever opinion he wants, just as someone against interracial coupling can hold that opinion if they really value it. What no one has, however, is the right not to be called out on their bigotry. Especially when something as flimsy as religion is their only justification for it.

GrimTuesday:

TheLycanKing144:
It's no where close to around 80%, I wouldn't even go so far as to say it's 50% either. It depends on what state you are in perhaps, but even in many of the most liberal states (such as California) gay marriage support is pretty low.

Except that is wrong. As others have said, recent polling has shown that 80% of people between the ages of 18 and 29 support gay marriage. So where is your research that tells you otherwise and allows you to dismiss actual evidence? I'm sure I can find you multiple polls that show that acceptance of gay marriage is somewhere around 57% with people against gay marriage making up roughly 33% with 10% having no position, and if you can provide me with even one relevant study that backs you up, I'll actually go find far more that support my claim.

I think this issue could be solved easily simply by giving gay couples the same legal benefits. It's only when they want to refer to it as marriage do people start to draw the line, and contrary to popular myth on this forum, many of those people are not homophobic bigots at all.

Except then we get into the whole separate but equal conundrum. Even if you just say that domestic partnerships are equivalent to marriage, you are still say that it isn't marriage, and thus you have the implication that it is inferior to straight marriage.

But I know how people on here like to group together and beat up on the guy who voices the different opinion (which is hypocritical considering many of these same people like to brag about how "tolerant" and "open minded" they are to different views), so I'm just going to leave it at this.

So, see, we like to beat up people who voice opinions which are contrary to the evidence. I'm not responding to tell you you are wrong because your views are conservative and thus incorrect, I'm quoting you because what you're saying is wrong because all the evidence as far as popular support for gay marriage is the opposite of what you're claiming it to be.

1. There are millions of polls everyday, you shouldn't believe them. It's not even close to 80%, I can assure you. I live in America, I know first hand. Either this poll was done with a very small group of people or it's exaggerated. Either way it's nothing to get excited about.

Here read this: "Why Polls Overstate Support for Gay Marriage" (I apoligize if link does not work)

2. Except it's not the same as marriage. Marriage is defined as a man and a woman, not a man and a man or a woman and a woman. It's not the same term, I can say 1+2=3. But 1+1 does not equal 3, nor does 2+2. No matter how much you want to say it's the same as the first equation, it never will be. Gay couples say they take pride on being unique, well they should just find their own unique term then to define their unions. Marriage is not a term that should refer to them.

And no one believes that all marriages are "equal", do you support polygamy? Do you support incest marriages? If not why? After all even the most pro gay activists are against those people getting married. But why? What is their argument then? That it's wrong? That it's not what marriage is defined as? That it's bad for society to do those things? As you can clearly see no one thinks all partnerships are equal or that they deserve to be called "marriage". Are those people so called "bigots" too?

3. Yes there are a lot of people on here who do jump on the people who have different views. I noticed that the good majority of people on here all have the same exact views on everything, they cheer each other on and tend to gang up on the people who disagree. This is not a coincidence, but I get the feeling a lot of people here are simply trying to fit in more than anything else.

EDIT: I want to make something very clear. I do not hate gay people, I want them to have ALL the benefits and legal rights as straight couples do. I may disagree with their lifestyle, but that doesn't mean I hate them. I love them the same way as everyone else, I have no right to judge or discriminate against them.

I just don't believe the term "marriage" should be changed. I am fine with gay couples getting unions and calling it anything they want to, and they should have all the same legal benefits as everyone else, as long as it's not called marriage. However I don't see how you can compare this to interracial marriages because this isn't even the same issue.

TheLycanKing144:
1. There are millions of polls everyday, you shouldn't believe them. It's not even close to 80%, I can assure you. I live in America, I know first hand. Either this poll was done with a very small group of people or it's exaggerated. Either way it's nothing to get excited about.

Here read this: "Why Polls Overstate Support for Gay Marriage" (I apoligize if link does not work)

Where do you live? I ask this because certain areas don't have strong support, and so you might think that, having experienced your communities views, you can speak for others. Well guess what, you can't speak for the rest of America, because we are a very large and diverse nation. Here in Washington Referendum 74, which was to legalize gay, won with 53% of the vote, and thats likely without super turnout by 19-29 year olds who tend to be more liberal.

2. Except it's not the same as marriage. Marriage is defined as a man and a woman, not a man and a man or a woman and a woman. It's not the same term, I can say 1+2=3. But 1+1 does not equal 3, nor does 2+2. No matter how much you want to say it's the same as the first equation, it never will be.

So, is it wrong to say that a marriage of peanut butter and jelly is wrong, as isn't not between a man and a woman? What about a marriage of steak and potatoes? Germans and beer? Marriage is a word, and words are constantly evolving in meaning. It is also a social status, with comes with all sorts of legal protections and privileges, and to deny another human being those rights, just because your bronze age religion says that its wrong for two dudes to love each other is wrong.

Gay couples say they take pride on being unique, well they should just find their own unique term then to define their unions. Marriage is not a term that should refer to them.

You know what word belonged to another group before the group that uses it now used it? The answer is nigger. Now, using your logic, it is extremely offensive for black people to have adopted it, as it was originally a word that had a specific meaning to my slave holding ancestors. Now, would you support taking nigger back for the white folks, and making black people come up with their own "unique term" that defines them?

And no one believes that all marriages are "equal", do you support polygamy? Do you support incest marriages? If not why? After all even the most pro gay activists are against those people getting married. But why? What is their argument then? That it's wrong? That it's not what marriage is defined as? That it's bad for society to do those things? As you can clearly see no one thinks all partnerships are equal or that they deserve to be called "marriage". Are those people so called "bigots" too?

Polygamy is usually not supported because of the fact that there are those who have in the past abused it, and have used it in a predatory manner, often involving brainwashing and other creepy shit that you don't see outside of the FLDS. If it were numerous people who were all in love and wanted to all get married to each other, fine, I say let them, though as I said, it has a bad reputation because of folks like Warren Jeffs who have used it as a way to manipulate people and use it for their own predatory ends. Incest isn't a big deal so long as no offspring come of it. What right do we have to condemn others for who they love?

3. Yes there are a lot of people on here who do jump on the people who have different views. I noticed that the good majority of people on here all have the same exact views on everything, they cheer each other on and tend to gang up on the people who disagree. This is not a coincidence, but I get the feeling a lot of people here are simply trying to fit in more than anything else.

Part of it is because in a lot of European countries, this isn't really a controversial topic, its just that when American conservatives, being far right on a global scale, start bringing these issues up, you get a very similar response from about two thirds of the user base, because a lot of US liberals want to see something similar to Europe, and what American conservatives are railing against is already part of European life.

EDIT: I want to make something very clear. I do not hate gay people, I want them to have ALL the benefits and legal rights as straight couples do. I may disagree with their lifestyle, but that doesn't mean I hate them. I love them the same way as everyone else, I have no right to judge or discriminate against them.

I just don't believe the term "marriage" should be changed. I am fine with gay couples getting unions and calling it anything they want to, and they should have all the same legal benefits as everyone else, as long as it's not called marriage. However I don't see how you can compare this to interracial marriages because this isn't even the same issue.

I don't think anyone is call you a bigot, but I would argue that even if you don't realize it, you are discriminating. By saying that you don't think it should be called marriage is to say that their love isn't as worthy as "straight love" and that what ever you would call gay marriage isn't as good as regular marriage. Would my brother being able to marry a man, and call it marriage make whatever marriage you have/will have? In addition, definitions change all the time, why should a social contract that is made between two people that is backed by a secular government be protected because the religious community has a problem with it.

So, TheLycanKing144, you're fine with gay people getting married...as long as they call it "civil unions" (but with all the legal benefits of "marriage"), not "marriage". What's in something as superficial as a name? And what's so great about marriage that you want it to stay within the realm of man and woman? As if man-woman relationships are somehow more deserving of the term "marriage" than man-man and woman-woman relationships?

Also, can't definitions of not just marriage, but anything, change over the years, as society and culture, you know, progresses? Just as we humans and technology have evolved over the years? Even the word "gay" used to only refer to happy people, rather than just a slang term for homosexuals.
But whatever. I think marriage, straight or gay, as a concept is fucking stupid, outdated nonsense and I don't care about this anymore either way. As if we still need some flimsy contract to express our love for a partner.

Relish in Chaos:
So, TheLycanKing144, you're fine with gay people getting married...as long as they call it "civil unions" (but with all the legal benefits of "marriage"), not "marriage". What's in something as superficial as a name? And what's so great about marriage that you want it to stay within the realm of man and woman? As if man-woman relationships are somehow more deserving of the term "marriage" than man-man and woman-woman relationships?

Also, can't definitions of not just marriage, but anything, change over the years, as society and culture, you know, progresses? Just as we humans and technology have evolved over the years? Even the word "gay" used to only refer to happy people, rather than just a slang term for homosexuals.
But whatever. I think marriage, straight or gay, as a concept is fucking stupid, outdated nonsense and I don't care about this anymore either way. As if we still need some flimsy contract to express our love for a partner.

I agree with the first part, but at least when it comes to the government being able to legally recognize spouses is helpful simply for practicality. Being able to recognize spouses makes it easier for the spouse (who otherwise is in no way related to the other person in question) gives hospitals a baseline as to who can visit the person and who will be making decisions about their healthcare if they are unable to, gives banks a baseline as to how "together" a couple is when making joint bank accounts or loans and mortgages with both of their names on them, gives the government a baseline for inheritance (if two people are married and one of them dies, the belongings pass onto the widow with no estate or inheritance taxes. In any other case there are some pretty steep taxes taken out). In fact, that is the kind of thing that is happening to gay couples under DOMA. Their marriages are recognized by their states, but DOMA forces the federal government to not recognize their marriages so when one of them dies they are forced to pay thousands in inheritance taxes that straight couples wouldn't have to pay.

TheLycanKing144:
It's no where close to around 80%, I wouldn't even go so far as to say it's 50% either. It depends on what state you are in perhaps, but even in many of the most liberal states (such as California) gay marriage support is pretty low.

You've seen this from me before, you'll see it again:

image

Present your evidence. Back up your claim. Or is this going to be another case of the big bad liberal media distorting info?

Last poll I checked said 74% in favor between ages of 18-30, 31% in favor 65 and above. Overall, 53% support, 39% oppose, with a whopping 30% of those polled saying they changed their minds in the last five years.

http://www.cbsnews.com/8301-250_162-57576249/poll-53-of-americans-support-same-sex-marriage/

In California, the support for gay marriage was 74%, 22% against. So much for that piece of misinformation.

I can't draw upon the numbers right now, but if I recall correctly, basically every generation except for the Baby-Boomers are more for gay rights than against gay rights. The Boomers are basically dragging the percentages down. In ten years there will be very few Boomers left and gay rights will be assured, if they aren't already by then, seeing as the movement is gaining a lot of speed very quickly.

It won't be the differences in belief by area, ie "The south is more conservative, north more liberal" that ultimately creates the future, but the generation gap.

MarsAtlas:
I can't draw upon the numbers right now, but if I recall correctly, basically every generation except for the Baby-Boomers are more for gay rights than against gay rights. The Boomers are basically dragging the percentages down. In ten years there will be very few Boomers left and gay rights will be assured, if they aren't already by then, seeing as the movement is gaining a lot of speed very quickly.

It won't be the differences in belief by area, ie "The south is more conservative, north more liberal" that ultimately creates the future, but the generation gap.

Possibly, and hopefully, but that could change the other way.

TheLycanKing144:
1. There are millions of polls everyday, you shouldn't believe them. It's not even close to 80%, I can assure you. I live in America, I know first hand.

Your continued habit of arguing against evidence with what could at best be described as personal anecdotes and at worst gut feelings only demonstrates that it is pointless to discuss just about anything with you. You hand wave evidence without explaining why and then make statements of fact without providing evidence of your own. This makes any point you make in such a manner utterly worthless and a waste of time for anyone to refute since there's no need to refute arguments you haven't even attempted to effectively prove.

You need to work on your debating skills because as it stands your arguments are laughable. And I don't mean that as an insult. I'm simply at a loss as to how else to convey the fact that your arguments tend to be completely worthless.

 

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