What is Gun Culture

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I rarely make threads.

So, I hear the word 'gun culture' bandied around a lot on this forum. Like, a lot. Usually alongside 'evil' 'wrong' 'kill happy' 'theocratic' 'freedom loving' etc.

But, I don't understand what the gun culture is? See, I mean wikipedia gives me this:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gun_culture

But when people on this forum talk about gun culture they always seem to be talking about...I don't know? People who own guns to kill people? It's really honestly confusing. What the view HERE seems to be of what 'gun culture' is does not = what wikipedia says it is.

And just to make my own position clear, since this will inevitably fall into gun-law debating:

Handguns should be heavily regulated, long arms should keep about where they are, assault weapons should be registered but only restricted in that manner, explosive devices (hand grenades, C4) are a no no unless being used in a provable venture way (c4 being used to create 'movie dirt explosions' for example).

I've never owned a gun, but I have fired several types before, and we have one at work its my job to maintain and research. It's a doglock. I am very much aware of the history of gun ownership (read: before WW1 every man was expected to own a gun because standing armies weren't really a thing yet, and they needed to know how to use it) because it's part of my job at the museum, at least for the 1600's.

Now could someone define this mother fucking term?

To me personally on a macro scale? Gun culture is when people try to get others to buy and own/get rid of a gun through fear and paranoia, mostly through lobbyists, politicians and opinion piece/news pundits. Basically what you see on Fox, ABC, MSNBC and such news sites(and include the more well known blog sites) when they talk about gun ownership and such.

On a micro scale? Gun culture is two fold. There's the owner aspect, where you own a gun and use it for your own reasons. Be it hunting, target practice, or self defense. Then there's the debate aspect, where you have people from all walks of life throwing their views on guns into the world without a care for who listens and what they say.

From what I've seen? There's two types of "gun culture" being thrown about that has been hijacked by Interest Groups.

1) We have Gun Culture that bandies that "Liberals wanna ban all the guns" who scream and preach that it'll leave us defenseless to the evils of our neighbors for you never know that they might rape/kill/steal from you and destroy the very fabric of society.

2) Then we have Gun Culture that bandies that "Conservatives want to give everyone guns, even criminals" who scream and preach that it'll spread guns to everyone, including the rapist/murderer/thief that lives next door waiting to get their hands on said guns to use for their evil purposes and destroy the fabric of society.

So far, from what I've heard from a couple gun owners I know personally, gun culture to them is where gun owners just want to own a gun, not be demonized for something that about people who don't buy their guns through legal channels(Legal as in gun shows and gun stores) means. But ultimately, there is really no definite explanation about gun culture. It means different things for different people, and the inclusion of rather vocal people muddies the water. Seriously, while I can understand the need for the NRA, the fact that the head people of the organization can say some really unpleasant things about guns makes me shake my head. MSNBC, ABC, CNN and other places can be as bad too.

And for what I believe? Most guns used in crimes are either bought from a private seller(As in either black market/straw purchase or a person selling their gun without getting the legal work done through a gun shop) or they take the gun from a family or friend. So the issue isn't guns, but responsibility and how if a person sells their gun privately or it's used by a family member or friend in a crime, the original owner should be charged for criminal negligence for either not storing the weapon properly, selling it without proper oversight, or not reporting a their weapon was stolen. In regards to black market/straw purchasing, we need to get tougher on the people that sell weapons through illegal channels.

I have never really found a satisfactory definition for the term, nor have I been able to pull one out of me ass, so I can't give to good of an answer to that one. I suppose gun culture is essentially how a group views and uses firearms, and in America you cannot claim that there is one singular gun culture as guns mean a lot of different things to a lot of different people. If I had to divide it into the four most general groups it would be based on their dedication, and their status as far as owning guns. (The numbers I give are based on the assumption that 45% of Americans own firearms)

Dedicated Gun Owners: Tend to be more conservative but I have met quite a few gun owners who are liberal in other areas, but follow a pro-gun agenda. These people usually see guns as tools and symbols of freedom and independence. These people are generally the ones that you want having guns as they understand their usage and gun safety better then anyone else. These people are hostile to anything resembling more restrictive legislation. I am a member of this community and can say personally that the most disconcerting thing is how often they allude to revolutions and revolts, but this tends to be a smaller subset within the group and most of it is not very serious. This is about 30% of the US.

Non-Dedicated Gun Owners: These are the people I do not feel safe around much of the time. They own guns, but they are not invested in their care or in the learning of safety. They also are far more likely to give into new laws then Dedicated Gun Owners but typically err on the side of less restrictive, you'll see a majority favoring back ground checks and similar proposals, but almost none supporting a ban on semi-auto rifles and standard capacity magazines. This group's politics run the spectrum though tend to be more conservative. This is about 15% of the US.

Non-Dedicated Non-Gun Owners: This is the biggest group of Americans. The one trait I'd assign to them as far as firearms go is "ignorant". The vast majority know next to nothing about guns, gun politics, gun safety, or anything else to do with them, and are usually honest on that matter. As far as politics they tend to follow the last argument that was shown to them that wasn't completely retarded. This is why the only time pro-gun control sentiment really rises is after shootings, and then drops back down to pre-shooting levels, and often even below them thanks to NRA and GOA ad campaigns. This group's politics run the spectrum though tend to be more liberal. This is about 45% of the US.

Dedicated Non-Gun Owners: This group is the essentially America's hardcore "progressives", or as my circle of gun owners call them, "gun grabbers". These are the people that are actively against firearm ownership and usage. I believe that this group is ignorant of all things gun related just like their non-dedicated cousins, except they tend to act like they know what they are talking about. This group is almost exclusively liberal and tends to be a much younger crowd. Makes up about 10% of the US.

This is based on my personal experience and all the studies I've seen on the subject. Take it with a grain of salt. I also feel I should mention the mainstream media. The Mainstream media's presentation of matters to do with firearms is almost always inaccurate and sometimes even purposefully deceptive. CNN and MSNBC often are either bringing on anti-gun commentators, showing off complete idiots and pretending they're average gun advocates(like Piers Morgan having on Alex Jones), or are simply biased in their reporting and tone. I don't like it, and it never stops irking me.

Shock and Awe:
-snip-

I always enjoy trying to categorize myself when other people make lists like this, but unfortunately this time around I don't seem to fit neatly into a mould.

As for how I view gun culture, the wiki article has some good info, but also seems a bit lacking. When I think 'american gun culture', the fetishisation of guns and the lone cowboy hero figure often come to mind. I know some responsible gun owners, but by and large the people I know that like guns tend to be of the mindset that picking one up makes you John McClane.

Jux:
I always enjoy trying to categorize myself when other people make lists like this, but unfortunately this time around I don't seem to fit neatly into a mould.

As for how I view gun culture, the wiki article has some good info, but also seems a bit lacking. When I think 'american gun culture', the fetishisation of guns and the lone cowboy hero figure often come to mind. I know some responsible gun owners, but by and large the people I know that like guns tend to be of the mindset that picking one up makes you John McClane.

Oh god, a thousand times over, I couldn't agree with you more. It's really so much of a juvenile sense of entitlement and invincibility that I notice with most gun fetishists. The idea that guns save lives, it's for my own protection, blah blah blah, only sound like the ravings of an adolescent boy to me. I've never once heard a compelling argument come from that side of the aisle.

To me, it's the possession and use of firearms (generally to kill people, but not always) seen as a normal part of everyday life, something to be taken for granted.

By way of example, much of the Western world does not view self-defence as a reason to own a firearm, and does not view proficiency with firearms as an important skill for most people. However, you have gun owners in the US that believe that everyone should own at least one firearm, regularly practice with it, and be prepared to kill people with it.

The latter attitude, I would say is an example of "gun culture", as distinct from the former which is not.

EDIT: Oh, and I would tend to agree about gun control people in the US. While I strongly agree that it'd be better for the US if it had better gun regulations, most of them seem not to have bothered to have learnt anything about any of the issues involved.

Having said that, there seems to be fair too many gun supporters in the US that don't know anything about firearms, but they almost always include the ones that do.

I have several friends who have modified assault weapons (modified to be fully automatic). They use them to shoot cans or show off. Same person also has a semi-automatic pistol and a concealed weapons permit for it. Last time some guys came after him outside a Taco Bell because he yelled at them for calling a server a fag, he pulled the gun and they ran screaming into the night.

Personally, I have no problem owning a low magazine weapon for hunting, sport, or even self-defense if you're paranoid about that (According to FBI Crime Stats, only 8% of home invasions involve a firearm, and less than 1% involve a firearm larger than a pistol). Anything more than that, and your best use switches from targets or wildlife to humans.

Jux:

Shock and Awe:
-snip-

I always enjoy trying to categorize myself when other people make lists like this, but unfortunately this time around I don't seem to fit neatly into a mould.

As for how I view gun culture, the wiki article has some good info, but also seems a bit lacking. When I think 'american gun culture', the fetishisation of guns and the lone cowboy hero figure often come to mind. I know some responsible gun owners, but by and large the people I know that like guns tend to be of the mindset that picking one up makes you John McClane.

This is pretty much it, OP. Just the general sense of fascination and obsession with guns that seems to permeate American culture.

Bentusi16:

But, I don't understand what the gun culture is? See, I mean wikipedia gives me this:

...

Now could someone define this mother fucking term?

A gun culture, in its broadest sense, would be the belief in and potential glorification of gun ownership and use.

However, we could identify multiple forms of gun subcultures. The most obvious to an American is the NRA-style defence of the right of gun ownership, liberty, independence, hunting etc. However, we might point at others such as the glorification of guns in gang culture. In the UK, it might simply mean a tendency for criminals (usually in gangs) to use guns. We might consider a media gun culture - routine use of and perhaps more importantly resolution of conflict by guns - in film/TV/video games. And so on.

When I think gun culture I think of a mindset which basically dictates that guns solve all safety problems and that taking away said guns will give criminals power over the innocent.

On a certain level they're correct. Guns do allow you to defend yourself and put you on equal footing with criminals who don't care about the law and would own guns regardless of the rules. But what they often overlook are accidents, the fact criminals aren't born criminals and law abiding citizens owning guns may become criminals and that guns can be stolen and get in the hands of criminals. People who don't have this pro-gun mindset usually consider these three latter issues to be more problematic than the loss of ability to shoot someone who may or may not want to kill you. (Let's not forget many criminals who get shot most likely weren't even after your life)

Captcha: "sound of sirens", how appropriate...

Jux:

Shock and Awe:
-snip-

I always enjoy trying to categorize myself when other people make lists like this, but unfortunately this time around I don't seem to fit neatly into a mould.

As for how I view gun culture, the wiki article has some good info, but also seems a bit lacking. When I think 'american gun culture', the fetishisation of guns and the lone cowboy hero figure often come to mind. I know some responsible gun owners, but by and large the people I know that like guns tend to be of the mindset that picking one up makes you John McClane.

I admit that I enjoyed shooting a rifle when I was a kid. Heck, I enjoyed blowing shit up too with firecrackers (who doesn't!?), but still, this is where I see the problem lies. If someone owned as fire-arm strictly for protection, then fine. But when it becomes an interest, when you by magazines about them, when you go off to the firing-range to 'squeeze off a few rounds' because you enjoy it and it takes the stress off, and not because you strictly need the practice, then it becomes too much for me. Then it becomes a degree of gun-culture that I really can't support. Yes, I'm putting the bar that low. Guns shouldn't be an 'interest' in my mind.

Jux:

Shock and Awe:
-snip-

I always enjoy trying to categorize myself when other people make lists like this, but unfortunately this time around I don't seem to fit neatly into a mould.

Yeah, the only perfection in categorizing groups of people is that they always have exceptions.

Realitycrash:

Jux:

Shock and Awe:
-snip-

I always enjoy trying to categorize myself when other people make lists like this, but unfortunately this time around I don't seem to fit neatly into a mould.

As for how I view gun culture, the wiki article has some good info, but also seems a bit lacking. When I think 'american gun culture', the fetishisation of guns and the lone cowboy hero figure often come to mind. I know some responsible gun owners, but by and large the people I know that like guns tend to be of the mindset that picking one up makes you John McClane.

I admit that I enjoyed shooting a rifle when I was a kid. Heck, I enjoyed blowing shit up too with firecrackers (who doesn't!?), but still, this is where I see the problem lies. If someone owned as fire-arm strictly for protection, then fine. But when it becomes an interest, when you by magazines about them, when you go off to the firing-range to 'squeeze off a few rounds' because you enjoy it and it takes the stress off, and not because you strictly need the practice, then it becomes too much for me. Then it becomes a degree of gun-culture that I really can't support. Yes, I'm putting the bar that low. Guns shouldn't be an 'interest' in my mind.

Out of curiosity, what else shouldn't be an interest?

Bentusi16:

Now could someone define this mother fucking term?

Good luck with that. You can't even get anthropologists to agree on what "Culture" is, and if they can't do it no-one can.

Bentusi16:

Realitycrash:

Jux:

I always enjoy trying to categorize myself when other people make lists like this, but unfortunately this time around I don't seem to fit neatly into a mould.

As for how I view gun culture, the wiki article has some good info, but also seems a bit lacking. When I think 'american gun culture', the fetishisation of guns and the lone cowboy hero figure often come to mind. I know some responsible gun owners, but by and large the people I know that like guns tend to be of the mindset that picking one up makes you John McClane.

I admit that I enjoyed shooting a rifle when I was a kid. Heck, I enjoyed blowing shit up too with firecrackers (who doesn't!?), but still, this is where I see the problem lies. If someone owned as fire-arm strictly for protection, then fine. But when it becomes an interest, when you by magazines about them, when you go off to the firing-range to 'squeeze off a few rounds' because you enjoy it and it takes the stress off, and not because you strictly need the practice, then it becomes too much for me. Then it becomes a degree of gun-culture that I really can't support. Yes, I'm putting the bar that low. Guns shouldn't be an 'interest' in my mind.

Out of curiosity, what else shouldn't be an interest?

Going out in the woods, shooting an animal, putting make-up on it and then leaving it there for others to find.
(Yes, I have a friend that does this. Apparently, according to him, it is 'catching on').

I wouldn't want to ban gun-magazines or rifle-training. I just find it distasteful, equally so as the pointless act of violence that my friend engages in.

Shock and Awe:
Snippity snip

I agree with his categorizing of gun culture. I fall under the Dedicated Gun Owner crowd and I surround myself with these types of owners but have no issues with helping out someone who is new to firearms. We preach safety and strive to bring a positive image of gun ownership. We don't bother anybody and we like the same respect, which is why many have the Don't Tread On Me flag.

NameIsRobertPaulson:
I have several friends who have modified assault weapons (modified to be fully automatic). They use them to shoot cans or show off. Same person also has a semi-automatic pistol and a concealed weapons permit for it. Last time some guys came after him outside a Taco Bell because he yelled at them for calling a server a fag, he pulled the gun and they ran screaming into the night.

I love modified assault weapons, they are ever so much fun to shoot up TVs and stuff with. Another fun one is Albertsons/Safeways soda sales, buy like 10 2 litters for 5 dollars and blast them apart.

As for the OT, I like Shock and Awe's scale. I would fit in at a Dedicated gun owner.

There are any number of definitions that can be used. Most depend on your particular view of gun owners. Shock and Awe and myself are involved in the gun culture and because of that we are more likely to differentiate between the "levels" of gun ownership. Anti-gunners tend to combine all gun owners into two groups, the sensible ones and the nut jobs.

When I refer to the gun culture I am generally referring to people who participate in various activities and people who share a general mindset. A person who just has a gun is not really a part of the culture. They share an object with us. However, I have a truck but that does not make me a truck aficionado. On the other hand, if I went to car shows and supped up my truck then you could probably say that I am a part of that culture. If a person is a competitive shooter or a hunter or just someone who trains on a range and has discussions with other gun owners then they are a part of the culture.

At the same time there is a mindset element. Obama can shoot as many clays as he wants but as of now his mindset is not that of a gun owner (as far as I have seen). The mindset is a little harder to define but generally the person has to be supportive of the general right of all people to use firearms lawfully (so Fudds can go fuck themselves), they have to be willing to learn about their equipment (and view it as such) and other relevant facts, and they have to want to be involved in the culture.

Obviously there are outliers but I think this is generally correct.

Whole lot of ignorance going on here. This explains why people react to gun owners and the culture the way some do, because too many of you have no idea what you are talking about.

The gun culture is generally very similar to, say, a car culture. They are both focused on the machines that require operations and have different philosophies of use. They come in many different styles, have loads of history and are iconic cultural parts of history.

There is extensive craftsmanship, engineering and technology involved in the creation, and like cars both are accessorized and collected. Some are very rare to find, some are very rare to own because of the associated cost.

You have your hobbyist who likes to tool around with them in his garage and you have your idiot who buys one and thinks it makes them "cool". You have your professionals who handle them for a living and the troublemakers who go out and get people killed.

If you believe gun culture is about people who are out for their own egos, suffer from paranoia or operate on an "entitlement" basis, with "juvenile" attitudes and material complex issues, you make about as much sense as saying black culture is about thug life, hip-hop and gold chains. You sound like homophobes who think gay culture is about lisp, flaming outfits and women's fashion. You're no better than people who think Islam is about terrorism and hatred of western culture.

Gun culture is about people who take interest in guns, know a lot about them, own them, use them and have a certain passion and interest, and many like to share that with others like them. A lot of gun owners buy, modify and store their guns, rarely using them, just like car collectors may have a garage full of machines they never drive.

There's nothing to say to people who think it's about rowdy roughnecks who get off on the power and thrill, clinging to an outdated document. If you don't understand then you need to get educated. Learn about people and culture rather than judge them.

Gun culture is not a fixed term. In my view it refers to the general approach towards gun ownership and usage in a society. Germany has a gun culture. The USA have a gun culture. Japan has a gun culture. And so on. But when we talk about gun culture, we usually mean it to refer to a particularly widespread access to and usage of guns, usually with detrimental effects. It's about a cultural approach to guns that goes overboard, with weapons becoming a hobby, a necessity, a status symbol, a means of glorification and so on. But that doesn't mean countries with more sensible rules and regulations or outlook towards firearms don't have a gun culture, too. It's just rarely referred to because it's considered to be less of a problem.

I am going to make this as blunt a post as I can Gun Culture does not exist just as Gamming Culture Does not exits. The term was created for what ever reason as a catchall for anyone who was socialy active about their guns/gun ownership. But just like with gamin there is no unified culture and even between gun owners opinions on everything vary widely

Realitycrash:

Bentusi16:

Realitycrash:

I admit that I enjoyed shooting a rifle when I was a kid. Heck, I enjoyed blowing shit up too with firecrackers (who doesn't!?), but still, this is where I see the problem lies. If someone owned as fire-arm strictly for protection, then fine. But when it becomes an interest, when you by magazines about them, when you go off to the firing-range to 'squeeze off a few rounds' because you enjoy it and it takes the stress off, and not because you strictly need the practice, then it becomes too much for me. Then it becomes a degree of gun-culture that I really can't support. Yes, I'm putting the bar that low. Guns shouldn't be an 'interest' in my mind.

Out of curiosity, what else shouldn't be an interest?

Going out in the woods, shooting an animal, putting make-up on it and then leaving it there for others to find.
(Yes, I have a friend that does this. Apparently, according to him, it is 'catching on').

I wouldn't want to ban gun-magazines or rifle-training. I just find it distasteful, equally so as the pointless act of violence that my friend engages in.

Why do you find it distasteful? Not the makeup thing, that's weird, but just firing a rifle at a target for sport? Target as in target, not target as in animal.

"Gun culture" is usually the buzz word I see that clues me in that someone is about to say some incredibly ignorant shit. I can count on one hand how many times I've seen someone present that phrase in any sort of serious context and they knew what the hell they were talking about. I'm extremely pro-gun control, but I've never seen more ridiculous arguments then I've seen come out of my own side. Possibly tied with their anti-gun control foils. Ironically, it seems our knowledge of guns comes from movies and video games.

thanatopsis112:
I am going to make this as blunt a post as I can Gun Culture does not exist just as Gamming Culture Does not exits. The term was created for what ever reason as a catchall for anyone who was socialy active about their guns/gun ownership. But just like with gamin there is no unified culture and even between gun owners opinions on everything vary widely

I wouldn't go as far to say it isn't a thing. Just because there isn't one unified set of opinions and ideas doesn't mean there isn't a gun culture or gaming culture for that matter. When most people talk about the "Gun Culture" I feel they are trying to refer to what I called the "Dedicated Gun Owners", who have very common feelings on firearms. It goes beyond an interest or hobby for lots of people and becomes part of their life style, like gaming does for many. Opinions do differ of course but you have many common threads that unite us, again, much like gaming. AgedGrunt and farson135 explained some parts of gun culture very well. As far as I see it, if we can have "American Culture" as varied as we are, we can have "Gun Culture" and "Gaming Culture" as well.

The largest practical problem I have with people I personally know that carry guns is the attitude they adopt when they are carrying. In my mind, if you are going to carry a gun for self defense, you need to be constantly aware of your surroundings, to a degree most people I know are not capable of doing. Most of the people I know become more lax when they are carrying. I suppose the attitude is that they feel safer with it, so they're less worried, and as a result, less vigilant. I find such an attitude very irresponsible.

In addition, there is a subtle shift in attitude I see often where less care is taken to avoid confrontation when carrying. This is an ill informed attitude I think. If I were to carry, I would take extra care to extricate myself from potentially volitile situations, as I would be in possession of something that would only escalate things, literally to the point of life or death. This is a massive responsibility, and something I don't feel enough people appreciate fully.

I think this all plays into certain aspects of gun culture, at least here in the US. These are just my personal observations of family, friends and aquaintences. Ya'll might have different experiences, I'm not claiming this is universal. I do think it's worth paying attention to in greater detail, as a matter of introspection if you carry, or just a matter of observation if you associate yourself with those that carry.

AgedGrunt:
If you don't understand then you need to get educated. Learn about people and culture rather than judge them.

If we learn about this culture, spend time around people and have friends among those who are part of it, can we then render some form of judgment?

Jux:
In my mind, if you are going to carry a gun for self defense, you need to be constantly aware of your surroundings, to a degree most people I know are not capable of doing.

No one can do that. Even a well trained person can only remain at Condition Yellow for a portion of the day. Longer than that and you quickly become drained and are unable to function.

Most of the people I know become more lax when they are carrying.

Funny, I have the opposite experience. In my experience people who carry tend to be at a heightened state of alert unless the carrying is not for self defense.

In addition, there is a subtle shift in attitude I see often where less care is taken to avoid confrontation when carrying.

Once again, my experience is the opposite. The vast majority of CHLs feel that they need to be careful when they draw because they could very easily be arrested because of an LEO's bad decision.

I think this all plays into certain aspects of gun culture, at least here in the US. These are just my personal observations of family, friends and aquaintences. Ya'll might have different experiences, I'm not claiming this is universal. I do think it's worth paying attention to in greater detail, as a matter of introspection if you carry, or just a matter of observation if you associate yourself with those that carry.

The vast majority of people I know who carry do so with an understanding that the law is very vague when it comes to self defense and in many cases it is a he said, she said kind of thing. That breeds caution and consideration. I have met more CHLs who have read books by Massad Ayoob (or similar) than not. Many of the CHLs I know (including myself) keep 911 and the police department on speed dial (others say that having 911 on speed dial is a little ridiculous) but almost all CHLs carry their phone as a part of their EDC.

The only swagger I have ever seen comes from the general mindset of a real shooter and frankly every shooter needs that.

farson135:
-snip-

I have no doubt that your personal experience differs from mine Farson. Our local cultures might play a part in that difference, as do the backgrounds of those we commonly associate with.

As for my opinions on what constitutes a safe and mature attitude when carrying, especially where alertness is concerned, I know it's draining. I work in a job where for 12 hours at a time, I need to be constantly aware of whats going on around me. I work with high pressure steam, rotating equipment, high voltage electricty, and dangerous chemicals. It is a struggle sometimes to not get lax and fall into tunnel vision and lazy routines. But it is possible. And I feel that it is the responsibility of a gun carrier, both to themself and to those around them, to do the same when they choose to carry around such lethal instruments.

Jux:
I have no doubt that your personal experience differs from mine Farson. Our local cultures might play a part in that difference, as do the backgrounds of those we commonly associate with.

More who we associate with. I have been all over the US and world and I have met shooters all over. So my locality is irrelevant.

As for my opinions on what constitutes a safe and mature attitude when carrying, especially where alertness is concerned, I know it's draining. I work in a job where for 12 hours at a time, I need to be constantly aware of whats going on around me. I work with high pressure steam, rotating equipment, high voltage electricty, and dangerous chemicals. It is a struggle sometimes to not get lax and fall into tunnel vision and lazy routines. But it is possible. And I feel that it is the responsibility of a gun carrier, both to themself and to those around them, to do the same when they choose to carry around such lethal instruments.

No it really isn't. I highly doubt you work 12 hours straight in that kind of area. You take regular breaks and when you are actually around those things you have a clear target to look at. Try walking down the street and remaining at Condition Yellow for even an hour and you get drained. You have to look everywhere because there is no clear target (if there was you would be in Condition Orange at the very least) and humans naturally try and wind down a bit when there is no clear danger. What's worse is that you can quickly overload yourself with information and begin to lose focus. Walking down a busy street in Condition Yellow means that you pick up an insane amount of information and most of it is irrelevant. You filter, and even the best of us filter in the wrong way occasionally and screw up. I was walking in West Campus and I was so busy watching the construction area (small street and several vehicles were moving equipment and materials across the street and both sidewalks) that I tripped on a hunk of concrete that they had just left lying around. That caused me to lose focus for several seconds on the construction area despite the fact that there was a clear danger to me in that area.

farson135:
-snip-

It sounds like you fell victim to tunnel vision. Not trying to lecture you here, but when you're multitasking, don't try to pay attention to everything at once, that's why you get overloaded. Continually scan your surroundings, it cuts back on the information you take in at any given moment. Think of it like driving your car, if you want a simplified example. You watch the road ahead of you, you check your mirrors, you check your blindspots, you watch your speed, maybe you change the cd or radio station sometimes. But you don't do it all at the same time do you? You cycle through it, usually at a fast enough speed that it feels like a smooth transition.

Aside from my lunch break, and the start and ends of shift when I make relief with shiftmates, my time at work is spent in that kind of area. And I would be maimed or dead a dozen times over in the time I've been at this job if I didn't maintain the level of vigilance that I do. It doesn't really matter if you believe me or not, but between my job and my hobbies, I have a lot of experience with safety.

Bentusi16:

Realitycrash:

Bentusi16:

Out of curiosity, what else shouldn't be an interest?

Going out in the woods, shooting an animal, putting make-up on it and then leaving it there for others to find.
(Yes, I have a friend that does this. Apparently, according to him, it is 'catching on').

I wouldn't want to ban gun-magazines or rifle-training. I just find it distasteful, equally so as the pointless act of violence that my friend engages in.

Why do you find it distasteful? Not the makeup thing, that's weird, but just firing a rifle at a target for sport? Target as in target, not target as in animal.

I find making actual, non-pretend violence (such as movies or video-games) problematic. Shooting a rifle for sport was not what I meant with 'gun-culture', though. It is the glorification of weapons and indirect glorification of violence via magazines and web-sites, community-groups (even such things as soft-airguns), and the like.
Basically, when you are treating real-life weapons as a toy, as something that is 'fun' instead of something that should be 'Serious Business', I get a bit uneasy. I get the same way when people I know talk about different knives and swords, what assorted weaponry they have at home, etc.

Shock and Awe:

thanatopsis112:
I am going to make this as blunt a post as I can Gun Culture does not exist just as Gamming Culture Does not exits. The term was created for what ever reason as a catchall for anyone who was socialy active about their guns/gun ownership. But just like with gamin there is no unified culture and even between gun owners opinions on everything vary widely

I wouldn't go as far to say it isn't a thing. Just because there isn't one unified set of opinions and ideas doesn't mean there isn't a gun culture or gaming culture for that matter. When most people talk about the "Gun Culture" I feel they are trying to refer to what I called the "Dedicated Gun Owners", who have very common feelings on firearms. It goes beyond an interest or hobby for lots of people and becomes part of their life style, like gaming does for many. Opinions do differ of course but you have many common threads that unite us, again, much like gaming. AgedGrunt and farson135 explained some parts of gun culture very well. As far as I see it, if we can have "American Culture" as varied as we are, we can have "Gun Culture" and "Gaming Culture" as well.

The basic problem is that to be a culture you have to have a unifying shared experiance and that does not exist between gun owners that is only a experiance of gun owners or if your desire is to narrow it down members of some mythical "Gun Culture" this isnt like being Black in America where there are certain social experiences that for better or worse are experienced by most if not all members of the community. Heck just go and see how different how each individual Gun forum is just to see how there is not even one unifying cultural experience that is "Gun Culture" exclusive. In side of the supposed "Gun Culture" that you and others lay out in their definitions you break things down into strata and groups but even those groups do not have an exclusive or even semi exclusive experience that ties them together. There are individuals the will never hunt, there are individuals that only hunt and have no desire to use a gun for self defense, there are individuals that only collect firearms and have never shot one, and there are individuals that may or may not own a gun but rabidly talk about how it is a constitutional right and finally there is mostly a mix of people that dabble in any or all of these personal views, but there is still no shared cultural experience that ties them all together that is not shared by people "outside the community." There are plenty of people who are introduced to firearms by boyfriends or girlfriends and never go shooting again or never want to, so the act of shooting a gun is not some exclusive experience. There are people that buy a gun because they live in a high crime part of town but never get socially involved so gun ownership is not some exclusive shared experience either, neither is hunting, target shooting, the desire for self defense, or intrest in historical relevance of the firearm. Also there is no uniform treatment of gun owners in the USA. So there is no unified cultural experience and as such no "GUN CULTURE."

thanatopsis112:

Shock and Awe:

thanatopsis112:
I am going to make this as blunt a post as I can Gun Culture does not exist just as Gamming Culture Does not exits. The term was created for what ever reason as a catchall for anyone who was socialy active about their guns/gun ownership. But just like with gamin there is no unified culture and even between gun owners opinions on everything vary widely

I wouldn't go as far to say it isn't a thing. Just because there isn't one unified set of opinions and ideas doesn't mean there isn't a gun culture or gaming culture for that matter. When most people talk about the "Gun Culture" I feel they are trying to refer to what I called the "Dedicated Gun Owners", who have very common feelings on firearms. It goes beyond an interest or hobby for lots of people and becomes part of their life style, like gaming does for many. Opinions do differ of course but you have many common threads that unite us, again, much like gaming. AgedGrunt and farson135 explained some parts of gun culture very well. As far as I see it, if we can have "American Culture" as varied as we are, we can have "Gun Culture" and "Gaming Culture" as well.

The basic problem is that to be a culture you have to have a unifying shared experiance and that does not exist between gun owners that is only a experiance of gun owners or if your desire is to narrow it down members of some mythical "Gun Culture" this isnt like being Black in America where there are certain social experiences that for better or worse are experienced by most if not all members of the community. Heck just go and see how different how each individual Gun forum is just to see how there is not even one unifying cultural experience that is "Gun Culture" exclusive. In side of the supposed "Gun Culture" that you and others lay out in their definitions you break things down into strata and groups but even those groups do not have an exclusive or even semi exclusive experience that ties them together. There are individuals the will never hunt, there are individuals that only hunt and have no desire to use a gun for self defense, there are individuals that only collect firearms and have never shot one, and there are individuals that may or may not own a gun but rabidly talk about how it is a constitutional right and finally there is mostly a mix of people that dabble in any or all of these personal views, but there is still no shared cultural experience that ties them all together that is not shared by people "outside the community." There are plenty of people who are introduced to firearms by boyfriends or girlfriends and never go shooting again or never want to, so the act of shooting a gun is not some exclusive experience. There are people that buy a gun because they live in a high crime part of town but never get socially involved so gun ownership is not some exclusive shared experience either, neither is hunting, target shooting, the desire for self defense, or intrest in historical relevance of the firearm. Also there is no uniform treatment of gun owners in the USA. So there is no unified cultural experience and as such no "GUN CULTURE."

I'm not trying to make the assertion that everyone whoever picks up a firearm is part of the culture you see around dedicated gun owners. I also think that your definition of culture is incredibly restrictive as there is no requirement of an identical shared experience, its about shared beliefs and ideas. That is something you can see among most gun owners when it comes to things regarding firearms.

To me, gun culture is a state of living where people are accustomed to being around guns. For example where I live the farmers have guns and a few people have guns for hunting.
I'm pretty sure the term 'gun culture' is a buzz word used when a shooting happens by the media.

I'm not pro guns but I do know when a tool is a tool.

Jux:
It sounds like you fell victim to tunnel vision. Not trying to lecture you here, but when you're multitasking, don't try to pay attention to everything at once, that's why you get overloaded. Continually scan your surroundings, it cuts back on the information you take in at any given moment. Think of it like driving your car, if you want a simplified example. You watch the road ahead of you, you check your mirrors, you check your blindspots, you watch your speed, maybe you change the cd or radio station sometimes. But you don't do it all at the same time do you? You cycle through it, usually at a fast enough speed that it feels like a smooth transition.

The most obvious threat was to my left and I factored out what was directly in front of me. That happens. No one can be perfect least of all when you have too much going on. Once again, Condition Yellow on your average city street can provide far too much useless information especially if you know what to look for. A more general example might be, you see a person hitch up their pants from the 4-5 o'clock position. That implies that the person might be carrying a concealed handgun (or that they are just hitching up their pants in that location). You would focus on that person because they are an immediate appreciable potential until you access the situation. On a more normal note, when you are about the cross a street you attention is probably on your immediate right and left because those are the locations where you are most likely to have an immediate problem. Everybody filters and the more you know, the more potentials you may see.

It doesn't really matter if you believe me or not, but between my job and my hobbies, I have a lot of experience with safety.

As do I. I am an experienced hunter and I usually hunt relatively dangerous game. I am also a self defense instructor and I try and remain at Condition Yellow the majority of the day but between the constant shifting that is impossible. Which is why I also train people to do things that limit the necessity of remaining at Condition Yellow.

What you are asking for is too much. You cannot remain at Condition Yellow at all times without causing yourself problems. At the very least you must always have a location from which to relax. Your home, your office, etc. If not, you will lose the plot very quickly. That is why the military sends soldiers on R&R.

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