18-yr-old student faces felony charges for a pocket knife discovered in his car

Wiser was enrolled at the Ashtabula County Technical and Career Campus (A-Tech) in Jefferson, Ohio, a small village located about 60 miles northeast of Cleveland. Wiser told HuffPost he was taking A-Tech's Firefighter 2 and EMT courses.

"Last year, I completed the law enforcement course," he said. "I received several certifications, including the National Terror Defense certification from FEMA, the Terror Recognition certification and [certification as an] Emergency Vehicle Operator."

On Dec. 12, 2013, administrators at A-Tech approached Wiser after someone allegedly tipped them off about videos Wiser had uploaded to YouTube.

The YouTube account in question appears to include reviews of video games and merchandise, demonstrations on home defense tactics and an interview with a local police officer.

"The principal said he had reason to believe I had weapons in my vehicle and needed to search it," Wiser said. "He made me empty out all my pockets, and the vice principal grabbed me and patted me down very forcibly. It was somewhat awkward. Then they took my car keys. I told them what was in my car and said, 'Don't be alarmed.'"

Wiser said he did not give school officials permission to search his vehicle, and there was no warrant to perform the search. School administrators, he said, cited the school handbook as their warrant. He claims they also denied his request to call an attorney.

Inside Wiser's vehicle, officials found an assortment of items, including the folding blade pocketknife, a stun gun and two Airsoft guns. Airsoft is a sport in which participants eliminate opponents by hitting them with spherical non-metallic pellets, launched from the Airsoft guns.

Wiser said the Airsoft guns were in his trunk because he had plans to participate in the sport after school. The stun gun, a nonlethal device capable of incapacitating a person by administering electric shock, was for self-defense, he said. The pocketknife was, according to the teen, part of his EMT kit.

"I was in jail for almost 13 days," Wiser said. "The first bond hearing I went to was on December 15. The judge ordered me [to be] held on a half million-dollar bond, pending a psychological evaluation. I did that and passed. They found I was not suicidal, homicidal or a threat to anybody. My attorney brought it up in front of a different judge, who let me out on a $50,000 bond and an ankle monitor. I was released from jail on Christmas Eve."

Wiser said the conditions of his bond also prohibit him from having any contact with his grandfather, who is dying from cancer.

"The one judge I went in front of told me to remove any firearms from my parents' house and put them at my grandpa's house," Wiser said. "The next judge freaked out about me even knowing what a gun is and put a no contact order against me and my grandparents. My grandfather is dying right now, and I am not allowed within 500 feet of him."

Specht said his office believes the felony charge is justified and has no plans to reduce the charge.

Source: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/03/10/jordan-wiser_n_4921266.html

I'm kind of flabbergasted at this. I understand that schools have extremely strict rules on this kind of thing, but the way this situation was handled... is just a little extreme, especially given the circumstances.

What are your thoughts? Justified safety measures, or a violation of civil rights?

At 18 years old, this seems excessive for a non-violent crime...however I'm given to believe there's more to the story than what's been told. Why the grandfather, specifically? Why did he feel it necessary to bring a stun gun onto school property (let alone airsoft guns)?

That...'arsenal', while not particularly lethal smacks suspicious. I definitely think additional evaluation is warranted.

However, if none of this *was* on school property, then that changes things.

From his side of the story it sounds like a violation of rights of some sort.

Leads me to think there is surely more to this story than that.

Seems like a gross violation of civil rights. Are they really that scared of a 4 inch pocketknife in an EMT kit? Unbelievable.

Wow, if it happened like those quotes would imply, this is even more paranoid and hilarious (in a sad way) than usual. He didn't actually do anything, even if was playing to... What, scare somebody with the airsoft guns? Pretending to read peoples minds like that and punish them for some imagined offense is just ridicolous.

A shame that 'Murica can't hear me over the sound of it's freedom.

From what's there it seems like a major over-reaction, especially when it's a college student. When I was at university I had multitools with knife blades on me most days because it was easier than hunting out the departments tools when I needed to fix a piece of equipment. I've also worked in plenty of places where carrying a blade is necessary, mostly for cutting open boxes and packaging. Given that I'm still in what most people consider the group most likely to carry a weapon for 'protection' (under 25s) I'm always aware that I might have to explain why I have it but I'd never expect to be facing any kind of legal issues because of it.

So, yeah. Either the school has gone completely nuts with anti-weapon rules or there's something in this story we haven't been told.

Methinks there's more to this story than one article. But going solely off the article here's my takeaways:

1) He's likely guilty of the charge pressed on him. According to the article "Wiser was ultimately arrested and jailed for illegal conveyance of a weapon onto a school ground, a Class 5 felony." He brought a weapon (the knife) onto a campus via his vehicle, even if it was in his first aid kit, and has acknowledged that fact.

2) The search was legal. There is no warrant requirement for a school to search a student's bag or vehicle if it is located on campus, although they must have some reasonable suspicion that they would find contraband or that the search could reveal evidence of a crime or potential crime. This would still follow even at the college level, although most schools add a provision in their handbooks as a matter of notice and security.

3) The question of whether it actually should be a felony is ultimately not going to be up to the judge's discretion. If the law lists it as a felony, then the judge is required to follow it. Whichever body legislated the law should likely either clarify what constitutes a weapon or allow a judge to modify sentences based on the findings of fact.

4) The No Contact Order is extremely odd. There's no context for it in the article other than how the second judge reacted (which is even more odd given the substantial reduction in bail), so I'm holding off on a opinion on that until there is a real explanation for that.

My school had a strict policy against bringing any kind of weapon onto the grounds. Which I always found kind of funny, considering there were a plethora of potential weapons already in the school. Knives in the cookery classrooms. Baseball bats, cricket bats, javelins and hockey sticks in the P.E department. Hammers in the woodworking and engineering classrooms.

But yeah, a complete overreaction. He clearly had no intention of causing any harm, the so called "weapons" were safely locked away in his car, so what the hell was the problem?

Considering he has it as an EMT knife specifically for cutting seat belts, I'm guessing it's serrated. Considering he bought it from K-Mart, I'm guessing a black handle (you don't have many options at big box stores, especially for a serrated blade). Considering the principal actually flipped out and had the kid arrested, I'm guessing he had the kind of urban/suburban white collar upbringing that leads to seeing knives as weapons, rather than tools, saw a scary serrated black handled "weapon" and flew off of his own handle. That last one is kind of a stretch, but then so is literally any other reason this bozo would have actually turned this kid in to the police under the circumstances.

What really gets me is it's a technical school, I'm surprised every last teacher and most of the students aren't carrying at least a full sized leatherman, if not a decent folder, too. The more I look into this story, the angrier it makes me.

P.S.: There's literally nothing suspicious about the airsoft guns. For those unfamiliar with certain aspects of US youth culture, these aren't like real BB or pellet guns, they fire light weight plastic pellets, and are basically what kids who still like Nerf guns graduate to in their teenage years. Tend to be cheaper and look more like the real thing than paintball guns, especially at the entry level.

A student had a tool with what's got to be at least 100 uses with him? Clearly he had violent intentions like I do when I clean my fingernails with mine or use it to sharpen pencils or as a screwdriver or for cutting just about anything. The school is insane and so is the judge, clearly before going to a school EMTs must leave all blades, defibrillators, and needles at the hospital. If a kid dies because of it, well at least we know the EMTs weren't going to kill anyone themselves.

The Gentleman:
Methinks there's more to this story than one article. But going solely off the article here's my takeaways:

1) He's likely guilty of the charge pressed on him. According to the article "Wiser was ultimately arrested and jailed for illegal conveyance of a weapon onto a school ground, a Class 5 felony." He brought a weapon (the knife) onto a campus via his vehicle, even if it was in his first aid kit, and has acknowledged that fact.

2) The search was legal. There is no warrant requirement for a school to search a student's bag or vehicle if it is located on campus, although they must have some reasonable suspicion that they would find contraband or that the search could reveal evidence of a crime or potential crime. This would still follow even at the college level, although most schools add a provision in their handbooks as a matter of notice and security.

3) The question of whether it actually should be a felony is ultimately not going to be up to the judge's discretion. If the law lists it as a felony, then the judge is required to follow it. Whichever body legislated the law should likely either clarify what constitutes a weapon or allow a judge to modify sentences based on the findings of fact.

4) The No Contact Order is extremely odd. There's no context for it in the article other than how the second judge reacted (which is even more odd given the substantial reduction in bail), so I'm holding off on a opinion on that until there is a real explanation for that.

I am sad to say, but yes, by the letter of the law, he likely is guilty.

Is he guilty by the spirit of the law? Un-likley. Specialized knives made strictly to save people I doubt were really on the minds of anyone who wrote or passed the bill. Although, considering the guy is being charged with having a rescue knife in his first aid kit, in his car, which was in the parking lot of the school in question as a felon, I do wonder how much thinking actually went into the law in question.

My best guess on the granpa situation is that the are barring him from contact because the grandfather owns an old gun and since it is obvious that this 18 year old will commit mass murder at the drop of the hat and his grandfather can be the only possible means this kid could ever get a weapon, they must be kept apart.[/sarcasm]

Owyn_Merrilin:
Considering he has it as an EMT knife specifically for cutting seat belts, I'm guessing it's serrated. Considering he bought it from K-Mart, I'm guessing a black handle (you don't have many options at big box stores, especially for a serrated blade). Considering the principal actually flipped out and had the kid arrested, I'm guessing he had the kind of urban/suburban white collar upbringing that leads to seeing knives as weapons, rather than tools, saw a scary serrated black handled "weapon" and flew off of his own handle. That last one is kind of a stretch, but then so is literally any other reason this bozo would have actually turned this kid in to the police under the circumstances.

What really gets me is it's a technical school, I'm surprised every last teacher and most of the students aren't carrying at least a full sized leatherman, if not a decent folder, too. The more I look into this story, the angrier it makes me.

P.S.: There's literally nothing suspicious about the airsoft guns. For those unfamiliar with certain aspects of US youth culture, these aren't like real BB or pellet guns, they fire light weight plastic pellets, and are basically what kids who still like Nerf guns graduate to in their teenage years. Tend to be cheaper and look more like the real thing than paintball guns, especially at the entry level.

Depends if it's a folding knife or not. 27 states have different laws about considering knives weapons. Ohio's is something like 'If it's a folding knife that can be opened with one hand, and/or has a serrated edge, and/or can lock in place; then it could be considered a deadly weapon in violation of the concealed weapons statutes' (Not 100% sure on that, but pretty certain I got it right).

The Chief Assistant DA has implied that there's more to the story than has been revealed to the press, and I'm willing to give him the benefit of the doubt for a variety of reasons. Law enforcement tends to keep as much information away from the press as possible specifically because the public can't handle information very well. Especially when the full story isn't known because there's an ongoing investigation. A good recent example of this was the Zimmerman debacle.

There are two parts of the story that don't really add up as well. 1. Why did the school board have suspicion that he in particular had weapons in his car (It suggests it was because of his videoes about video games and defense techniques? Yeaaah, okay.) Aaaand 2. Why would they prevent him from seeing his grandfather over finding contraband in his property? That's not really something that's done without cause.

So yeah. Instead of outrage, I'm going to wait and see what the DA's office comes up with.

Understand that the arrest process is separate from the conviction process.

Police officers are not really given the authority to make decisions about guilty vs not guilty. That goes even more so for those who are assigned to high school security, which to me makes sense as high school cops really aren't the brightest bulbs in the box and shouldn't be in a position to employ discretion about safe vs unsafe for everyone's sakes. All they can do is arrest and follow the law explicitly or they would lose their jobs.

However, if the case is how it's being reported here any judge in his right mind would let the kid off. There is absolutely no indication that he had any intention of using thise weapons on anyone. He sounds well adjusted and harmless.

I'm assuming there is more to this story. The confluence of dipshits is a little too convenient. However, chances are that when the DA reveals their case, all the sensationalism will be gone and so will be the unprofessional hacks that reported the story.

Kopikatsu:

Owyn_Merrilin:
Considering he has it as an EMT knife specifically for cutting seat belts, I'm guessing it's serrated. Considering he bought it from K-Mart, I'm guessing a black handle (you don't have many options at big box stores, especially for a serrated blade). Considering the principal actually flipped out and had the kid arrested, I'm guessing he had the kind of urban/suburban white collar upbringing that leads to seeing knives as weapons, rather than tools, saw a scary serrated black handled "weapon" and flew off of his own handle. That last one is kind of a stretch, but then so is literally any other reason this bozo would have actually turned this kid in to the police under the circumstances.

What really gets me is it's a technical school, I'm surprised every last teacher and most of the students aren't carrying at least a full sized leatherman, if not a decent folder, too. The more I look into this story, the angrier it makes me.

P.S.: There's literally nothing suspicious about the airsoft guns. For those unfamiliar with certain aspects of US youth culture, these aren't like real BB or pellet guns, they fire light weight plastic pellets, and are basically what kids who still like Nerf guns graduate to in their teenage years. Tend to be cheaper and look more like the real thing than paintball guns, especially at the entry level.

Depends if it's a folding knife or not. 27 states have different laws about considering knives weapons. Ohio's is something like 'If it's a folding knife that can be opened with one hand, and/or has a serrated edge, and/or can lock in place; then it could be considered a deadly weapon in violation of the concealed weapons statutes' (Not 100% sure on that, but pretty certain I got it right).

The Chief Assistant DA has implied that there's more to the story than has been revealed to the press, and I'm willing to give him the benefit of the doubt for a variety of reasons. Law enforcement tends to keep as much information away from the press as possible specifically because the public can't handle information very well. Especially when the full story isn't known because there's an ongoing investigation. A good recent example of this was the Zimmerman debacle.

There are two parts of the story that don't really add up as well. 1. Why did the school board have suspicion that he in particular had weapons in his car (It suggests it was because of his videoes about video games and defense techniques? Yeaaah, okay.) Aaaand 2. Why would they prevent him from seeing his grandfather over finding contraband in his property? That's not really something that's done without cause.

So yeah. Instead of outrage, I'm going to wait and see what the DA's office comes up with.

It's pretty much guaranteed to be a folding knife, but given the intended use, also to be serrated, which if you're right on the Ohio law makes it a weapon. Because apparently Ohio's legislators are idiots who consider anything they think looks scary a "weapon."

As for the arrest, what I've seen is that the search was because of a report of marijuana smoke smell near his car. Gave the school probable cause to do a search, at which point they found the knife. I'm a substitute teacher (actually a certified social studies teacher, but still trying to find full employment), and trust me, the deans and vice principals at secondary schools get reports about kids smoking pot every day of the week. I've reported some smoke smells myself.

As for the grandparents, I haven't found anything concrete, but I did notice a quote from his father to the effect that all the weapons in the house had been moved to the grandparents' house. My guess is the second judge said no visitation because the first one said he couldn't be around weapons, and guess who has the weapons now?

Wish I had sources, I was looking this stuff up last night and the tabs are long since closed.

Just heard about this today. HUffington post interviewed Wiser and explained the no contact order with his grandfather:

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/03/10/jordan-wiser_n_4921266.html

"Wiser said the conditions of his bond also prohibit him from having any contact with his grandfather, who is dying from cancer.

"The one judge I went in front of told me to remove any firearms from my parents' house and put them at my grandpa's house," Wiser said. "The next judge freaked out about me even knowing what a gun is and put a no contact order against me and my grandparents. My grandfather is dying right now, and I am not allowed within 500 feet of him."

Specht said his office believes the felony charge is justified and has no plans to reduce the charge."

The prosecuter went on to say "There are all these school occurrences where people are shot, people are killed by other students," Specht said. "We see it every day ... so we don't take these things lightly. ... We have to be sure that we don't have a potential for something like that to happen here."

so lack of motive, a clean psyche eval (ordered by the court) and the fact the kid has been going to school for public services since he was 14 adds up to a "potential" school shooter? wow.

so if a teacher who part-times as an EMT and is former military would be treated the same? If the same knife and taser were found in his car? unlikely. this is just crazy

What the fuck is this bullshit? My god, people panic too damn much. I personally have an assortment of knives, swords, and other weapons. I could walk into a gun store and buy anything I like. I'm strong, I'm quick to react, and I have a temper. No one panics and jumps on chairs when I enter a room, no psych evaluation needed and no cause for concern. The school, the judges, and anyone else giving this guy a hard time should just retire, right now. They're over the hill, past their prime, and too wary to think clearly.

This is completely insane, but I'll tell you what's really going on here, it's the school and the prosecutor covering their collective behinds in case something does happen. Which means, of course, that all common sense goes out the window, 'cause we can't have a lawsuit against us if anything happens!

This isn't about student safety, and it never was.

Simplest explanation is that he showed the airsoft guns in his trunk to a friend at some point, a third student saw it, freaked right the fuck out, and went straight to the administration with a wild story about a kid in the parking lot with a trunk full of guns.

A quick scan of the school's weapon policy makes it almost ridiculously comprehensive; anything that is a real gun, looks like a real gun, or is mistaken for a real gun, is a violation of the policy. That's not terrible, but if you read on a bit further, anything that can be used as a weapon period is technically in violation if they see fit to declare it so.

That includes pens.

In a school.

And yes, they specifically mention pens. The caveat is that you have to use it in a threatening fashion, but still.

Pens.

Right, another article that will rile up those of us here at the escapist, and will never be updated unless it can somehow be made even more ridiculous or rage inducing.

If this is exactly as the article says it is, then yeah, it's complete bullshit. It's likely not how it says it is, though. There's more to this story. And I really hope this will be updated at some point. Too many times have people just not updated these stories here at the escapist if it couldn't get more people to click on it.

I believe this 100%. This is actually a pretty standard occurrence here in the US. The school system gave up critical thinking years ago. You are expected to have blind obedience to the rules, and that attitude has been slowly infecting the rest of the population. This case in my opinion is just an indication of a much bigger and frankly a pretty terrifying problem in the grand scheme of things. Nothing ever good happens when the general population refuses to think and make decisions on their own and instead unquestionably follow orders of the rule makers.

Kopikatsu:
Depends if it's a folding knife or not. 27 states have different laws about considering knives weapons. Ohio's is something like 'If it's a folding knife that can be opened with one hand, and/or has a serrated edge, and/or can lock in place; then it could be considered a deadly weapon in violation of the concealed weapons statutes' (Not 100% sure on that, but pretty certain I got it right).

I'm going to rant a little, and its not really directed at you, but at anyone that uses this kind of logic in terms of banning important tools.

A very popular, and incredibly useful, style of rescue knife is a folding blade that can be opened with one hand, it also has a curved serrated edge that locks into place. The things look like the talon of some freaky monster from a horror film, I can't say that I blame people for being scared by them, even if the fear is misplaced.

That stated, there are several cases where I wouldn't want people to go without a knife pretty much exactly like that. EMT personnel, sailors, and divers are top candidates.

Why?
1.) Because there is no other kind of small blade that is more effective at swiftly cutting fabric, ropes, and seatbelts off of a person without causing them harm.
2.) Because any kind of folding blade that doesn't lock in place is a safety nightmare, to the point that it should be illegal for any manufacturer to release one without some form of locking mechanism.
3.) Because a folding knife that requires two hands to use in an emergency situation is damn near useless.

Hell, a few years ago I used exactly that kind of knife to safe the life of a goat that would have definitely drowned if all I had to hand were straight edge blades, and I know very well the same kind of thing happens with people.

Owyn_Merrilin:

P.S.: There's literally nothing suspicious about the airsoft guns. For those unfamiliar with certain aspects of US youth culture, these aren't like real BB or pellet guns, they fire light weight plastic pellets, and are basically what kids who still like Nerf guns graduate to in their teenage years. Tend to be cheaper and look more like the real thing than paintball guns, especially at the entry level.

Partially off topic here, airsoft is actually more popular outside of the US than within for some odd reason, I don't think many of these guys need an explanation.

Also, it is MUCH more than just nerf deprived kids playing with BBs. For instance, some of the bigger and better funded airsoft events are conducted by military personnel, are often modeled after real historical battles, and will feature details such as live helicopter insertions and decommissioned tanks rolling down the streets. Look up Operation Irvine if you want a glimpse of what I'm talking about.

I'm actually in the middle of switching from paintball to airsoft myself. Among other things, the kind of realism it features is quite exciting compared to the three ring circus found with upper end paintball matches.

I wouldn't consider owning/having airsoft guns suspicious in and of itself for anyone over perhaps fourteen. However, by simply keeping them lying around in the trunk rather than in a sealed case he did violate a general guideline most airsofters stick to, that is to say, always treat it as if it were a real firearm when off the field. Among other things, it reduces the chances of people mistaking it for the real thing.

He also broke a well known and very strictly enforced school rule. Hidden away in the trunk or not, he is a bloody idiot for taking those things onto school property.

Heronblade:

Kopikatsu:
Depends if it's a folding knife or not. 27 states have different laws about considering knives weapons. Ohio's is something like 'If it's a folding knife that can be opened with one hand, and/or has a serrated edge, and/or can lock in place; then it could be considered a deadly weapon in violation of the concealed weapons statutes' (Not 100% sure on that, but pretty certain I got it right).

I'm going to rant a little, and its not really directed at you, but at anyone that uses this kind of logic in terms of banning important tools.

A very popular, and incredibly useful, style of rescue knife is a folding blade that can be opened with one hand, it also has a curved serrated edge that locks into place. The things look like the talon of some freaky monster from a horror film, I can't say that I blame people for being scared by them, even if the fear is misplaced.

That stated, there are several cases where I wouldn't want people to go without a knife pretty much exactly like that. EMT personnel, sailors, and divers are top candidates.

Why?
1.) Because there is no other kind of small blade that is more effective at swiftly cutting fabric, ropes, and seatbelts off of a person without causing them harm.
2.) Because any kind of folding blade that doesn't lock in place is a safety nightmare, to the point that it should be illegal for any manufacturer to release one without some form of locking mechanism.
3.) Because a folding knife that requires two hands to use in an emergency situation is damn near useless.

Hell, a few years ago I used exactly that kind of knife to safe the life of a goat that would have definitely drowned if all I had to hand were straight edge blades, and I know very well the same kind of thing happens with people.

Owyn_Merrilin:

P.S.: There's literally nothing suspicious about the airsoft guns. For those unfamiliar with certain aspects of US youth culture, these aren't like real BB or pellet guns, they fire light weight plastic pellets, and are basically what kids who still like Nerf guns graduate to in their teenage years. Tend to be cheaper and look more like the real thing than paintball guns, especially at the entry level.

Bit off topic, airsoft is actually more popular outside of the US than within for some odd reason, I don't think many of these guys need an explanation.

Also, it is MUCH more than just nerf deprived kids playing with BBs. For instance, some of the bigger and better funded airsoft events are conducted by military personnel, and will feature details such as live helicopter insertions and decommissioned tanks rolling down the streets. Look up Operation Irvine if you want a glimpse of what I'm talking about.

I'm actually in the middle of switching from paintball to airsoft myself, among other things, the kind of realism it features is quite exciting compared to the three ring circus found with upper end paintball matches.

You misunderstand me. It's not about being Nerf deprived, it's that it's the next step up in realism, power, etc. I know the sky's the limit as far as price goes, but in my experience most people start out with it as teenagers because the low end is cheaper and better than low end paintball, and it's more realistic overall. It''s interesting, too, because this is a change that happened somewhere between the time I was a kid and when I became a teenager myself. When I was little, and even into my early teens, people who were into that sort of thing were more likely to be into paintball, even though airsoft has been around for as long as I can remember. By late high school, airsoft was more popular, and from what I've seen with younger individuals since, it's more popular than paintball with people younger than me, too.

Didn't know that about airsoft being more popular outside the US, though. The comment was because there were a few people commenting about it being somehow suspicious, and also because I've seen people from Europe in the past making uneducated statements about air rifles and airsoft guns, not understanding the difference between airsoft and BB guns, let alone low end BB guns and full blown pellet guns, the latter of which can be legitimate hunting tools for small game at the high end.

Overall, though, I agree with you. I'm the kind of guy who doesn't like to leave the house without a pocket knife, and I find it absurd that a number of knife laws consider a locking blade something that turns a knife into a weapon. It's a safety feature that helps to keep the user from cutting their own hand open. I've got some cheap and nasty multi-tools that I'm afraid to keep sharp, specifically because the blades don't lock. Which is why I tend to carry both a locking knife for cutting things, and a small multitool for the pliers, screwdrivers, bottle opener, etc.0

Owyn_Merrilin:

You misunderstand me. It's not about being Nerf deprived, it's that it's the next step up in realism, power, etc. I know the sky's the limit as far as price goes, but in my experience most people start out with it as teenagers because the low end is cheaper and better than low end paintball, and it's more realistic overall. It''s interesting, too, because this is a change that happened somewhere between the time I was a kid and when I became a teenager myself. When I was little, and even into my early teens, people who were into that sort of thing were more likely to be into paintball, even though airsoft has been around for as long as I can remember. By late high school, airsoft was more popular, and from what I've seen with younger individuals since, it's more popular than paintball with people younger than me, too.

Didn't know that about airsoft being more popular outside the US, though. The comment was because there were a few people commenting about it being somehow suspicious, and also because I've seen people from Europe in the past making uneducated statements about air rifles and airsoft guns, not understanding the difference between airsoft and BB guns, let alone low end BB guns and full blown pellet guns, the latter of which can be legitimate hunting tools for small game at the high end.

Overall, though, I agree with you. I'm the kind of guy who doesn't like to leave the house without a pocket knife, and I find it absurd that a number of knife laws consider a locking blade something that turns a knife into a weapon. It's a safety feature that helps to keep the user from cutting their own hand open. I've got some cheap and nasty multi-tools that I'm afraid to keep sharp, specifically because the blades don't lock. Which is why I tend to carry both a locking knife for cutting things, and a small multitool for the pliers, screwdrivers, bottle opener, etc.0

I've actually taken to deliberately snapping the blade off of such multitools. Even a dull blade can be... problematic.

As for the popularity bit, paintball was an American invention, airsoft a Japanese one. The latter arrived on these shores after paintball became well established, and just in time for the beginnings of the now never ending gun control debate. So yeah, its spread a little more slowly here than it might have under other circumstances.

senordesol:
At 18 years old, this seems excessive for a non-violent crime...however I'm given to believe there's more to the story than what's been told. Why the grandfather, specifically? Why did he feel it necessary to bring a stun gun onto school property (let alone airsoft guns)?

That...'arsenal', while not particularly lethal smacks suspicious. I definitely think additional evaluation is warranted.

However, if none of this *was* on school property, then that changes things.

His car was on school property, and once a school decides to fuck you they almost always can if that's the case.

Almost everyone has something in their car that a school could catch you up on if they wanted. Usually when it happens, rather than some noble effort to keep the place safer, it's just school officials singling out people they don't life and searching to see what happens. Hell, how many people have pocket knifes in their car and don't even know they do? Tire iron in the part of a car where you don't keep your spare, damn sure a school will at least try to call that a weapon if they don't like you.

And it all comes down to whether they like you or the particular prejudice of the person handling your situation. For example, schools have a no tolerance fighting policy, even if you have been attacked. I saw kids get attacked, try to defend themselves at only the most basic level, and get in trouble. However, when somebody was making threats against me, because the campus administration and police liked me, one cop explicitly told me "if that boy attacks you, you snap him like a fucking twig and I'll make sure you're golden".

High schools don't have the most serious corruption in the country, but they are likely the nation's most corrupt institutions in regards to number of instances. And I don't find those items at all suspicious. I knew plenty of seniors in high school who had airsoft or paintball guns in their trunks. I knew a few people who not only had in their car but carried stun guns either just to show off or to defend themselves if someone came at them a bit more lethally. And a pocket knife, as I've said before, I don't even know if there is a pocket knife in my car right now. They're so small how would one be constantly aware of that? All of these are normal items for an 18 year old male to have in his vehicle.

This seems to be a pretty simple case, the school didn't like this kid, they came up with an excuse to fuck him, and they did to the tune of a felony charge. Until Americans stop being so butthurt any time the idea of more government regulation of education comes up, schools are going to continue fucking people they don't like for things that would cause a resolute "looking the other way" if a star student did it.

Sounds to me like someone was jealous that his own kid isn't a certified medical professional who's studying to be a policeman or a fireman, and he just wanted to ruin this well-meaning kid's life out of jealousy. And I'm totally convinced, being a US citizen myself, that the content of this particular article may very well be all that there is to this case, even if it ~does~ come from the Huffington Post.

 

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