Anti-depressant medication?

Hello, I am curious to if anyone on the forum has been on anti-depression meds, I have thought about going to a doctor to get some, I don't really know the precedure.

The reason I ask Is I want to know about your experience with them, was it worth it? Did you find you started to act like another person? (I'm not sure that's how I want to ask that question, but I can't think how to otherwise).

I guess my real fear of using them is that I might prefer who I am whilst on the medication and use it as a crutch, like painkillers in a way, they don't solve the problem just numb the feeling instead of cure.

Although I would prefer a more indepth version of "were they worth using", that is basically what my question boils down to. Thanks.

This is relevant to my interests.

I'd like to add another question: Did they help with depression related motivation issues?

Sorry I couldn't offer much.

Depending on the problem anti-depressants aren't a cure and will never cure the problem, just make it less noticeable.

Depressions isn't a 'curable' condition. It is a state of mind, either short term of long term. Anti-depressants help shorten the length of time that you are depressed, or if it is a condition like bipolar, help stabilize the person.

Do they make you a whole different person? No, you will still like, dislike, love, and hate the exact same things as before. Your views won't change. Will you 'feel' less and become numb, not really. Your overall feelings may change from "Hey I wanna not be alive" to "Hey maybe dying isn't on my agenda right now". They are designed to make the depressions less severe, and to help you get through it. Consider them a light in the darkness so to speak.

Did they help with depression related motivation issues?

For me no, I have a small list of problems, and my motivational issues lie in other problems. Like anxiety.

Hafrael:
Sorry I couldn't offer much.

Don't worry about about it :)

robert01:
-snip-

Thank you for your input, good to know I won't be emotionally dead or anything like that. My view on anti-depressants* was that they would alter your mind and thought process a bit more, happy to hear they won't be that mind altering.

*anti-depressant medication would have made a better title by miles, oops.

robert01:
Depending on the problem anti-depressants aren't a cure and will never cure the problem, just make it less noticeable.

Depressions isn't a 'curable' condition. It is a state of mind, either short term of long term. Anti-depressants help shorten the length of time that you are depressed, or if it is a condition like bipolar, help stabilize the person.

Do they make you a whole different person? No, you will still like, dislike, love, and hate the exact same things as before. Your views won't change. Will you 'feel' less and become numb, not really. Your overall feelings may change from "Hey I wanna not be alive" to "Hey maybe dying isn't on my agenda right now". They are designed to make the depressions less severe, and to help you get through it. Consider them a light in the darkness so to speak.

Did they help with depression related motivation issues?

For me no, I have a small list of problems, and my motivational issues lie in other problems. Like anxiety.

Thanks.

I'm considering talking to my doctor about them.

In some cases though they can aggrivate the thought process, my friend had some and she swore on the bottle it said : MAY CAUSE SUICIDAL THOUGHTS. There is also side effects. I need an anti depressant myself but worry about a lot of these risks.

When you first go on them, you'll be started off on something low-dose such as Lexam. your moods will change depending on how severe your depression is, the dose levels etc. I started off on Lexam 10mg then to 20mg before I started getting better. Just all depends on the person.

YOUR BEST COURSE OF ACTION: Take to your Doctor/GP about it, as they will make the recommendation if you need them or not. They will never put you on med/heavy doses unless its severe, so you'll start off on small if they recommend it for 'x' weeks to see how you go. If they do, Keep a diary and record your moods each day as it can help future treatments weather its dosage or Psychology.

ALSO: Some can cause you to get worse, It's not rare but it's possible sometimes certain doses/types can cause worse effects. On that note, ALL medication have a side effect, from mood swings, to (unfortunately for me at the time) total destruction of your sexual libido.

Beat14:
Hello, I am curious to if anyone on the forum has been on anti-depression meds, I have thought about going to a doctor to get some, I don't really know the precedure.

In the US all I needed to do was go see my normal doctor. As long as I'm not trying to kill myself or someone else he can prescribe them.

The reason I ask Is I want to know about your experience with them, was it worth it? Did you find you started to act like another person?.

It changed me, but in a good way. I used to be angry for no reason. It could be a perfectly good day and then I'd get depressed and pissy. All it did was make a good day a good day instead of a good day a crappy day. It doesn't make you happy, it just stops making you sad for no reason. Something to do with correcting a chemical imbalance in your brain. Serotonin is in simplest of terms is your brains "happy". Well if your brain destroys too much of it you can get depressed. Most anti-depressants slow down this rate of destruction, to give your brain a chance to use serotonin.

I guess my real fear of using them is that I might prefer who I am whilst on the medication and use it as a crutch, like painkillers in a way, they don't solve the problem just numb the feeling instead of cure.

My exact point, I stayed away from them for years because I didn't want to be in lala land while my life crumbles around me. If I messed up I wanted to know it and fix it. Let me tell you anti-depressants do not, I repeat DO NOT make you no longer give a shit or even stop you from feeling sad if something catastrophic happens. It just keeps you from getting sad for no reason. There are other, stronger medications, such as Xanax. That puts you in a stupor, but you can tell your doctor you don't want those and you'll be fine.

I regret not getting them in school. I think my socially life would of been much more... social. I would never force someone to take medication, but take it from someone who thought of the exact same reasons you are now. You are wrong.

Svenparty:
-snip-

Wouldn't have expected a side effect of: May cause suicidal thoughts, irony or what. After reading some of the things said I think I will go to my GP/Doctor and see what he/she says about me getting some, as I think it is worth trying. I am speaking for myself of course, however maybe you should try get some advice from a doctor/gp. Thanks for the reply.

Ziadaine:
-snip-

Sounds worth a shot for me, as starting on a low dose reassures me on my ability to judge the changes. I do intend to seek out my GP, and thanks for suggesting keeping a log of my moods, I wouldn't have thought to do so (whilst on the drug). :)

Unlucky on he loss of libido, it would happen at a bad time wouldn't it. Grim.
Thanks!

Zack Alklazaris:
-snip-

Thanks, it's great to hear about your insight of how the drug changed and helped you. As although I obviously have reasons for my depression, the onset of a depressed mood can appear to come out of no where at random! Thanks.

[On a side note, I'm not to be fussed to only be seeking treatment now, undoubtly I would have been benifitted socially and otherwise if I got them earlier. However the depression does give me some drive at times (might sound odd) but when I reflect on myself I know I want to change, and so I try. Can't say it's all a pretty picture of self-motivation, but it has certainly changed me the last few years]

robert01:
Depending on the problem anti-depressants aren't a cure and will never cure the problem, just make it less noticeable.

Depressions isn't a 'curable' condition. It is a state of mind, either short term of long term. Anti-depressants help shorten the length of time that you are depressed, or if it is a condition like bipolar, help stabilize the person.

Do they make you a whole different person? No, you will still like, dislike, love, and hate the exact same things as before. Your views won't change. Will you 'feel' less and become numb, not really. Your overall feelings may change from "Hey I wanna not be alive" to "Hey maybe dying isn't on my agenda right now". They are designed to make the depressions less severe, and to help you get through it. Consider them a light in the darkness so to speak.

Did they help with depression related motivation issues?

For me no, I have a small list of problems, and my motivational issues lie in other problems. Like anxiety.

To expand on this, depression meds actually treat a chemical imbalance. They wont help you if it's psychological. I highly recommend therapy before you jump to meds. Meds are something good to be used in conjunction to therapy and, if they find that you have said chemical imbalance it will help long term, but, if you don't have the imbalance the side effects of said medication can make your depression worse even cause you to have suicidal ideologies. See a therapist for a few weeks and talk about what's going on, be honest and open to help and let them decide if you need meds, not your physician. Best of luck to you.

Digitaldreamer7:
-snip-

Thanks, I appreciate that regardless if it was relevant to me.

robert01:
Depressions isn't a 'curable' condition. It is a state of mind, either short term of long term. Anti-depressants help shorten the length of time that you are depressed, or if it is a condition like bipolar, help stabilize the person.

Interesting. I strongly disagree.

First of all, I don't think you worded that properly. If depression wasn't a curable condition, wouldn't everyone who's ever been depressed still be depressed. But I know what you meant, but depression is a condition like any other and can be cured.

BUT. It can't be cured like the flu or like a broken arm. Depression only goes away if you really put in the man hours. Anti-depressants can stabilise you mood and get you through work, but at the end of that day you still have those problems and you can't just avoid them. Trust me, I know. I've been to the very bottom of this particular ocean and I got out of it.

You have to look at your life as a whole. Look at your friends, your family, your work/school. Find exactly what's making you unhappy and fix it. If it's something you can work on then do that. If it's something else you've been dumped or something then try and build up the other aspects of your life. Spend more time with your friends and family, take up a hobby or something like that. Take control of whatever you can take control of. It can seem daunting at first, but you only to make little steps. All progress is progress after all.

If you need any advice about overcoming a particular problem, feel free to drop me a message. I'm happy to help.

Disclaimer: The following is my personal experience, and in no way universal and/or a fact.

I have been on antidepressant meds in the past.

They pulled me out of a deep depressive ditch I saw no way out of myself and most likely helped me overcome a debilitating state of mind that kept me from functioning. They also destroyed my libido and endangered the relationship I was in then - no matter what people say, sex is important in a relationship. So it's a trade-off.

In the end...depression is serious, and scary. And if psychology doesn't help, meds are the only way out of it. Note; I am talking about clinical depression - a chemical imbalance in the brain that causes chaos. Feeling bad because you (you, as in, the reader) got dumped or fired, is not depression.

Still. Before going to antidepressant meds, you need to consult both your doctor and psychiatrist, get familiar with the meds' effects and side effects, and decide whether or not it's worth it. As I said. A side effect of most anti-depressants is decreased libido, so you should also talk it over with your spouse, if any. It's not a decision to be made lightly.

And in the end - the meds are not a cure, they're a crutch. It helps at first, but eventually, you need to learn to walk without it.

Phoenix Arrow:
-snip-

Thanks. I have been quite aware that the problems won't go away with medication and have done much self reflection, I'm very much an introvert anyway. But it is always good to be reminded progress is progress :) Just curious, how long did it take you rise from the depths of this ocean. I'm not going to sit here and use your answer as a goal or anything like that.

Vegosiux:
-snip-

Thanks to you too. I do intend to seek advice before jumping to medication, I'm the sort of person who puts off using drugs when ill unless I really can't bear it.

Depression sure does seem scary to me, my friend asked me how I was and I stupidly said I have a lot on my mind right now. It may be better to talk about it, but trying to think of a way of expressing my self without shocking a good friend is daunting to say the least.

Phoenix Arrow:
-snip-

Thank you. I have to admit I am curious about how long it took you to get out of the depths of this ocean? Don't worry I don't intend to use your answer as a goal of some sort. :)

Vegosiux:
-snip-

Thanks to you too. I agree on depression being scary, and on more than one level. When a good friend asked how I was I mentioned I had a lot on my mind, and said friend wants to know what, which I understand. However the thought of trying to express myself without shocking or troubling my friend is daunting, I will find out just what he thinks of my mind frame soon enough, but it's not something I look foward to many ways. As for my family I intend to hide the situation.

(the escapist ate my first post, so this is a rehashed version :/ hope it's just as good)

Oh woops, would appear my post got regurgitated back up. Sorry, I've kept both for the slight differences.

Beat14:

Phoenix Arrow:
-snip-

Thank you. I have to admit I am curious about how long it took you to get out of the depths of this ocean? Don't worry I don't intend to use your answer as a goal of some sort. :)

You know it's funny. I was so upset and don't remember exactly what happened that turned it around. I can tell you the full story though because I'm feeling chatty.
What happened was my boyfriend, who remains to this day the only person I've ever loved, left me. But we had been together so long and we were such good friends before that we remained best friends after. I should explain at this time that we didn't break up because the lover went or we lost "the spark", but due to a number of complications that made it so we both needed to step back and think about things. But I didn't want to, so I went into denial about the whole affair. I was convinced we'd get back together before a point in time which kept going backwards. I didn't achknowledge I was upset until he told me he was seeing someone else when I went into complete meltdown. I tried to get attention and sympathy from everyone to the extent where I probably hurt people who cared about me just to make myself feel better.
In the end, my mum found out and she made me go to the doctors. Just by going there, she made me feel like I wasn't alone, that scores of people were going through similar things to me and that there was hope. I spent more time at college and made some friends, I started walking everywhere. It still killed me to think of my ex, but I had other things to focus on. They broke up eventually which was helpful. I guess it took me 2 months to really feel like life would go on.

Fast forward to a few years later and after what I guess was a casual relationship with him again, he's started seeing someone else and as of the other day, I'm right back there again. Except this time I'm not at college and I don't have a circle of people to fall back on. I also don't know the person they're dating which I did before. I don't know how they are with each other, if they're serious or anything really. All I know for sure is I'm bloody terrifyed that I'm going to end up alone at the end of this.

Zack Alklazaris:
It changed me, but in a good way. I used to be angry for no reason. It could be a perfectly good day and then I'd get depressed and pissy. All it did was make a good day a good day instead of a good day a crappy day. It doesn't make you happy, it just stops making you sad for no reason. Something to do with correcting a chemical imbalance in your brain.

This is pretty much my experience with antidepressants. They didn't keep me from feeling sad, or detach me from the surroundings. I personally didn't notice much at all until I realized that I'd somehow gone for months without having a complete teary breakdown. It didn't stop my emotions, it just kept me from spiraling so hard I couldn't see straight. The medication let me stop and look at my surroundings without them automatically running together into some monstrous amalgamation of my failures and insecurities.

But, regardless of what comes up in this thread, this is something that has to be dealt with differently by every person, so definitely follow through on any plans you have to talk to a psychiatrist, and not just a physician. An in-person, professional opinion on various methods of treatment (chemical or not) sounds like what you could use right now.

Hafrael:
This is relevant to my interests.

I'd like to add another question: Did they help with depression related motivation issues?

This one's a little tougher. While antidepressants did pull me out of my particularly irrational (and unproductive) funks, they didn't do much beyond that. Being just so damn sad I couldn't do squat was one thing, but once I got things under control, I still had motivation issues, with both school and personal projects. I ended up on secondary medication to improve focus, but that did very little. I could focus just fine, just not on what was necessary.

Motivation is a very nuanced issue, and it's difficult to tackle. I never really got a handle on it in high school, but things got much better at college. I figured out that it wasn't necessarily the being AT COLLEGE part that suddenly "fixed" things, it was that I was suddenly surrounded on a near-constant basis by people with similar goals doing similar work. Just being around other people working made me want to work. It's a tough thing to balance, given that getting together with a bunch of friends can easily end up being a distraction rather than an aid, but once I found the right friends, I really settled into a groove, and eventually got to where I could channel that even when I was on my own. There are a lot of tips out there for self-motivation, but that's what ended up working for me.

You'll need to talk to a doctor because your depression is either one of two things:

Mental
Or..
Physical/Chemical

If it is physical/chemical is more than likely has to do with an imbalance of hormones or your brain not firing correctly on some fronts. I'm not doctor, but I've been on anti-depressants all of my life and that's pretty much what I've gathered.

If it turns out to be mental, it could be stress in your life causing it. Anti-depressants help your body deal with the chemical imbalances that give you that "meh" feeling. However, these drugs would only help slightly if the depression is "All in your head."

I digress.

The one drug I found that worked absolute wonders for me was one by the name of Gabepentin/Neurontin. It's pretty powerful in the doses I was taking it (1200mg in the morning) and it always gave me such a great feeling of well-being and slight hyper-activity. It definitely beats feeling like garbage all the time and chilling in front of a comput-..Wait, I still do that one!

Talk to your doctor and see a therapist. Talk it out with the therapist for a few weeks and if he thinks this is a chemical thing, a drug regiment sounds beneficial. However, if its more a mental thing, there are lesser drugs that could certainly help you.

A word of warning: If you're ever suggested to get on Gabepentin, watch out for it. When you stop it, it's like coming down off of 2 weeks without cigarettes.

Speaking as a final year medical student, go see a doctor. They will be able to answer your questions and managed necessary referrals.

Svenparty:
In some cases though they can aggrivate the thought process, my friend had some and she swore on the bottle it said : MAY CAUSE SUICIDAL THOUGHTS. There is also side effects. I need an anti depressant myself but worry about a lot of these risks.

That's usually only in the first couple of weeks. They take awhile before your levels of serotonin (and/or noradrenaline and dopamine) correct. Often in severely depressed people they may not want to live, but can't really be motivated to do anything (sometimes they have what's called psychomotor retardation, where they're so depressed everything they do is slowed down). When these levels are a bit erratic as the body reacts to the drugs, motivation and energy might be restored before the feelings of hopelessness resolves, so someone might be far more impulsive as to ending their life. It's something every patient is warned about and often anti-depressants are used alongside Cognitive Based Therapy (therapy revolving around thought challenging and behaviour change).

BiggDoggJake:
If it turns out to be mental, it could be stress in your life causing it. Anti-depressants help your body deal with the chemical imbalances that give you that "meh" feeling. However, these drugs would only help slightly if the depression is "All in your head."

The concepts of something being "all in your head" has always amused me, because that's basically what Psychiatry is the study of, the human mind, not the brain (that's a Neurologists domain). As soon as an organic cause can rightly be discovered it gets turfed to another field of medicine. Parkinson's disease used to be treated by Psychiatrist at one time.

So in essence all depressed mood be from chemical causes (major depression, bipolar affective) or social circumstances (adjustment disorder, abnormal grief reaction, etc), is still "all in your head". It's just ones amenable to pharmacological intervention.

Funnily enough ECT is the best form of treatment for depression, just it's a pretty major procedure and has unfortunately been stigmatized in popular culture.

Zack Alklazaris:
There are other, stronger medications, such as Xanax. That puts you in a stupor, but you can tell your doctor you don't want those and you'll be fine.

And those strictly aren't anti-depressants, rather sedatives. Useful once or twice term for getting some relaxation or sleep, but really never should be used long term.

Phoenix Arrow:
-snip-

That sounds like grim times to put it bluntly. I don't really feel like I'm anybody to suggest advice... However try branch out to other people (Easy to say eh?). I hope you don't dive back into that "ocean" :) I do feel slightly silly quoting that everytime, but sums it up nicely.

Beat14:
Hello, I am curious to if anyone on the forum has been on anti-depression meds, I have thought about going to a doctor to get some, I don't really know the precedure.

The reason I ask Is I want to know about your experience with them, was it worth it? Did you find you started to act like another person? (I'm not sure that's how I want to ask that question, but I can't think how to otherwise).

I guess my real fear of using them is that I might prefer who I am whilst on the medication and use it as a crutch, like painkillers in a way, they don't solve the problem just numb the feeling instead of cure.

Although I would prefer a more indepth version of "were they worth using", that is basically what my question boils down to. Thanks.

I'm kind of late to this discussion, but I think it's worth adding/clarifying that there are MANY anti-depressants out there, at many levels of potency, and if you do make the decision to be on one, it's worth researching it and discussing the side effects THOROUGHLY with your doctor, including the half-life of the drug, so you're as informed as possible. While they are NOT going to change your personality or make you into a different person, they can have fairly profound physical side effects that you want to be fully informed about.

And since I don't think anyone else has mentioned it, THE MOST IMPORTANT THINGS you can do to get through a depression are:

1. EAT WELL.
2. SLEEP WELL.
3. EXERCISE.

And take a D3 supplement. Boring eh? As someone who has been through two serious clinical depressions, and seen friends/loved ones through clinical depressions, there's really nothing better you can do for yourself. The anti-depressants are there to help give you enough motivation to start taking care of yourself again.

Beat14:
That sounds like grim times to put it bluntly. I don't really feel like I'm anybody to suggest advice... However try branch out to other people (Easy to say eh?). I hope you don't dive back into that "ocean" :) I do feel slightly silly quoting that everytime, but sums it up nicely.

Thanks. I know you're right, I've applied for some new jobs since the people I work with are all way older than me and it's not like a career type thing so hopefully that will be two birds with one stone. I've called up a couple of old friends just to sort of check in with how their lives are going and that. I'll be fine though. It just really caught me off guard. I do love him though. I wish he'd give me the attention he's giving this other person.
I guess for him it was a choice between meeting someone new and doing the whole getting to know you thing and the "settling down" option which I feel like I've become to him. I feel like he does want to settle down with me somewhere down the line, but he has some wild oats to sow in the meantime. Why else would he keep someone around he's both attracted to and still has feelings for?

BloatedGuppy:
1. EAT WELL.
2. SLEEP WELL.
3. EXERCISE.

Mmm. Totally true, but you know as well as I do, that's easier said than done. When you have clinical depression, the biggest problem is motivation. Motivation and apathy. You know you should go out and have a jog or whatever, but you don't want to. For that matter, you don't really want to eat anything either. All you want to do is lie in bed, play video games and listen to Radiohead. Then, if you're not exercising well, there's no way you're going to sleep well.

One other thing I recommend though is taking a good multi-vitamin like Berocca. B vitamins are what you want, they help your immune, digestive and nervous systems. Vitamin D too. Vitamin D is what you get from sunlight and it's basically magic. Reduces your chances of getting all kinds of diseases. These things obviously aren't going to affect your mood directly, but they're cheap and easy to do and make it easier for you to get better, if that makes sense. But the most important thing is to enough exercise to pick up your heart rate a bit. If you're unfit, then a half hour walk will probably do it, if you're fit then you know your capabilites better than I do.

That and talk through your troubles with people. Family members are brilliant for it, assuming they're not the problem of course. But if you do talk about stuff with your friends, try not to talk about it too much. It's easy to get carried away talking about your problems, but talking about other things will get your mind off it and people don't want to listen to someone talk about how depressed they are for hours on end.

Frezz:
-snip-

I can relate to the everything that the antidepressants stopped for you. Seems like it would be a good idea to get advice. Thanks for the info:)

BiggDoggJake:
-snip-

I have to admit I haven't a clue what type my depression is, I'm trying to avoid self diagnosis as it seems like a splippery slope that can just make matters worse. I sure do intend to talk it out with a professional. Thanks, I even got a little laugh about you sitting at your computer.

WolfThomas:
-snip-

Thanks, it's always interesting to get some scientific knowledge about something you're dealing with. I have to admit the thought of ECT doesn't settle well on my mind, although that was after a bit of "research" I just did on the internet, so it's probably not to shocking.

BloatedGuppy:
-snip-

Thanks for bringing such things to my attention, I have to confess that the side effects are something of a mystery apart from the possible destruction of my libido. However if I end up on any drugs I will look of course.

When you say eat well does that mean, eat enough and healthily? It's not like I eat junk food a lot, but I can't exactly say I eat healthily as such.

Beat14:

BiggDoggJake:
-snip-

I have to admit I haven't a clue what type my depression is, I'm trying to avoid self diagnosis as it seems like a splippery slope that can just make matters worse. I sure do intend to talk it out with a professional. Thanks, I even got a little laugh about you sitting at your computer.

Anytime, bro :D

I have OCD and depression and have had since middle school, and Ive been taking antidepressants for a couple months now. Specifically, Paxil. I started at 10mg, but that had no effect, so now Im taking 20mg.

They have helped a lot to be honest, and Im very glad I take them. I used to have such bad anxiety that I couldnt even be in the same room as someone talking about zombies, but now I can play Left 4 Dead and watch movies and stuff.

The thing about it is, at least for me, there isnt really an "okay" stage. Most days, Im happy, carefree (within reason) and feel like, well, a normal person. But when I get into a funk, I go down hard. Now is one of those times. I seriously havent gone to work or class since Sunday, I just sit at home and feel sorry for myself all day.

Honestly though, I dont think thats a normal thing. You should talk to your doctor, weigh the good with the bad, and make sure you have someone on your side to watch for odd behavior.

Beat14:
Thanks for bringing such things to my attention, I have to confess that the side effects are something of a mystery apart from the possible destruction of my libido. However if I end up on any drugs I will look of course.

When you say eat well does that mean, eat enough and healthily? It's not like I eat junk food a lot, but I can't exactly say I eat healthily as such.

When my father passed away suddenly, I went to see my doctor to talk about possibly getting on anti-depressants. Without even really discussing it with me, he prescribed one I'd not heard of before. I did a little research, and found out it was an incredibly potent anti-depressant with several extremely controversial side effects, including brain seizures. A lot of the people who had been on it expressed extreme regret and anger with their doctors. Naturally, I switched doctors, and did NOT fill the prescription. Not all anti-depressants are created equal. Some have a short half life and very mild side effects. Others are meant for extreme cases, like the one my doctor irresponsibly prescribed for me. Always know what you're getting into.

That's exactly what I mean. The standard North American diet is heavy in processed foods and light in nutrients, and...unsurprisingly...this has a devastating effect on our health (both physical and mental). You don't need to become a vegetarian, but you do need to eat whole, organic foods as often as possible and fast, processed foods as seldom as possible. We are what we eat. If you eat a lot of shit, you'll feel horrible, and you open yourself up to a whole range of significant long term health problems in your 30's and 40's if you don't get a handle on it early.

Here's a random article on depression and vitamin deficiency I found in a quick google search (I'm sure you can find more with a little effort): http://depression.about.com/cs/diet/a/vitamin.htm

Taking supplements will help, but the majority of your vitamin intake should be through your diet. It won't do much to take a multi-vitamin and eat at McDonalds 5 times a week. (You will need to take a Vitamin D supplement though, take about 4000 UI a day...usually 4 capsules/pills).

Good luck. Depressions are terrible, draining, and frightening, but it's important to remember that they are transitory, too. If you take care of yourself physically, talk out any issues you might be struggling through with friends/family/therapists, and keep plugging away at your life as constructively as your depression will let you, there's no reason you won't be feeling 100% better before too long.

Phoenix Arrow:
-snip-

Best of luck. I have nothing against older (or younger) people, but I believe it is better to work with some people of a similar age than with people with an age gap. Don't stop your self having a good time. There I go again giving more vague nonsensical "advice"... I better stop.

MajorTomServo:
-snip-

Thanks, I haven't even asked anyone about keeping an eye on me. That didn't stop some one coming over and asking me why I looked so sad all the time...and there I was thinking I had put up a go facade. Kind of when I thought this isn't normal.

I feel like my moods hit most of the spectrum although the up highs are rare and they always seem to be right after I all time low. I just seem neutral most the time, that or sad.

Sounds like your anxiety was pretty bad, I can barely imagine anxiety like that. Hope all goes/stays well.

BloatedGuppy:
-snip-

It never ceases to amaze me how a little bit of research can be so worth while, must be glad you did that. Thanks especially as I know some of your advice will ring in my eyes for some time.

Thanks for linking to an article, I would have looked at others even if you hadn't of said, but I much appreciate the addition of a link instead of just "google this" :)

Yes, there was a time when I was very much addicted to antidepressants. At first during a very tensed situation only, I was taking such medicines. But gradually it became my habit and I started taking antidepressants for mild stress and depressions also. Antidepressants take away or reduce the symptoms of depression and helped me feel better. The medicinal properties of antidepressants are given in the following site. http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/antidepressants.html
I have heard that antidepressants makes a person addictive of it. But is it true?

double posted... sorry

Would like to share a little bit of my experience...

I was on anti-depressants, mood stabilizers, sleeping pills etc for a while.
My diagnosis varied depending on the doctor, but basically it rooted on depression and the symptoms were fatigue, loss of interest in anything, but pissed off at everything, suicidal, among many others.

What the drugs did for me was it numbed me, for better and for worse.
i was also sleepy in a different way from being sleepy with depression.
So in answer to your question regarding motivation, maybe it wont raise it right away.

I was much mellower for sure, but in a way similar to someone stoned...maybe a more adequate description is slower???
People used to seeing me neurotic and aggressive would say "you are different" but it doesn't change who you are, or how you think at all.
I felt I was so slow and numb I didn't have the power to express how I felt and couldn't care less. Just wanted to stare at the wall or sleep.
Another side effect i experienced was a decrease of sexual appetite.

I think anti-depressants are helpful to many, and I too thought it was the solution to my problems at that time, but looking back now, I am not so sure if I would recommend it to other people.
Back then I was probably too dependent on it, and often, when I felt things got out of hand, i would take way more than prescribed so that I would fall asleep/ feel totally numb etc.

I don't think it was a chemical addiction, but more of a psychological one.
Though when i was decreasing my dosage, I had side effects like antsy feet, ringing ears, and vertigo.

Right now, I am totally free of medication, most of my symptoms are gone, and very rarely have severe mood swings. (even during PMS)

Depression is a curable disease(?), but it is not curable like, "take anti biotics and your cold will go away".
Its a loooong process, and meds only help you bear the journey.
if you are still at a point where you can function with out meds, I say, try alternative methods.
Maybe even go to counseling first before seeing a shrink.

I recovered because I learnt to let go of unrealistic goals and shrug off societal expectations if they did not match the person I am.
getting a dog really helped me too. (many reasons, but I wont go into detail.)

If finding something you love and can be passionate about can help you attain that, by all means try it first.

 

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