University at a later age.

Look, I won't sugarcoat it, but I fucked up. Royally.

Most people do the exact opposite of what I do. I ignored school in favor of work experience. I barely finished high school because of that and ignored pretty much the first 2/3rds of the semester in University and failed. Now I wish to fix that, but I haven't ever really figured out what I want to do in life, I could never stick to it. Hell, I have trouble sticking with 1 character in RPGs. Everything seems pretty ridiculous to me. So...I pretty much have no idea how to figure out what I want to do in life.

I studied engineering and failed because of stupid reasons (missed class a couple of times, gave up, came up with bullshit reasons why NOT to do something). The fact is however, most of the Universities in my country are quite shit. They're much more demanding than schools in other countries, but everything else is shit. It lacks a certain rigor which other schools in the west have. Everything from textbooks to lecturers are pretty dull and shitty.

Every school seems ridiculous or way too hard. I don't aspire to study something simple and have a worthless degree, since I want to invest 5 years of my life into something meaningful, if I'm going to invest at all (which I seem to be figuring out just now).

Now, at the age of 22, I want to go to University again and really make it worth my time. However, I have no idea what I want to do (I would love to study physics, but I'm definitely not fit for that). Also, I have to support my family, which is annoying, but it's not the end of the world. It's also a reason why I need to have everything thoroughly planned out and I have to extensively study ahead in order to have time for a part time job.

How did you guys figure out what you wanted to do?
Is it unreasonable to formally ask a company if I can do some shadowing in the workplace to figure out if I want to one day work for them?
Would it be possible for someone to help me with making a sort of study plan for the time being? I need to catch up on the basics now.

(I'm considering biomedical engineering, electrical engineering/energetics. Getting in is not a problem, since our schools have minimal entry requirements. Staying in school is the hard part)

Part-time study? Do the course in 4.5/6 years instead of 3/4? Less strain on work and family life in exchange for graduating later.

Thanks for the reply.
That's not a possibility where I live. Part time studying strips you of all benefits of being a student and is identical to a full-time study program, except you don't have to participate in some lectures and you have approximately 1 more week of finals each semester.

My main problem is that I'm really undecisive. I have no idea what I want to do and have no idea how to figure it out without any hands on experience. Which is crappy when I want to choose which school I want to study.

AstroSmash:
-snip-

You might try a community college rather than a full-on university, if they have something like that where you live. They are more geared toward adults who have been out of school for a while, and the classes tend to review the basics more to get everybody on the same page. Plus, you don't have to mess with living on campus or eating in dining halls, and it's easier to hold down a job at the same time.

Do your schools have open days where you can go check out the campus, attend short lectures about the courses they offer, seek advice from professors? That's a really good option if need help deciding what and where to study.

Do your schools offer any study workshops or academic counselling? For instance workshops in things like exam preparation and time management? If your feeling nervous about how you'll do the second time round this may be helpful.

Is there any financial assistance available to full time students that you can apply for to help with supporting your family while you study?

Also if you find your schools uninspiring is studying abroad an option? Even if you complete part of your degree there and then the rest of it somewhere else? Or even a year exchange somewhere else?

I did a similar thing to you OP. Went to University dropped out because I was doing terribly, worked for a couple of years and now I'm back at school and doing really well.

How did you guys figure out what you wanted to do?
Is it unreasonable to formally ask a company if I can do some shadowing in the workplace to figure out if I want to one day work for them?
Would it be possible for someone to help me with making a sort of study plan for the time being? I need to catch up on the basics now.

(I'm considering biomedical engineering, electrical engineering/energetics. Getting in is not a problem, since our schools have minimal entry requirements. Staying in school is the hard part)

Well I knew I wanted to do engineering and I like the medical field but I started in community college as an engineering student. I didn't put as much effort as I should have in my classes but I transferred into a 4 year university, in biomedical engineering, and just got the spark that need me to do well.

As far as Businesses I'm not sure about shadowing, I do know that many places in Europe have good internship programs that would probably be willing to let you walk around and see what people do.(without getting paid of course) Who knows you get the right company, you make an impression maybe they'll make an offer to let you work, they'll pay for college, and you work for them after you graduate. Just email a community relations person at the business and see if they would be interested, include a resume, and maybe a personal response on your goals and why your interested in their company and industry.

Now while the business thing is definitely a good option I do think I have something that could help you choose a direction in university. Most professors have on going research so you could try emailing a director of the specific program like mechanical engineering or bio-medical engineering and say I'd like a chance to experience the field and figure out if it's for me. Make sure to include in an email to this guy how much you'd really like a chance to learn about the program before you attempt it and how your just looking for a chance to volunteer in a lab, they do this with undergraduates and high school student but I'm not sure about your average person not in school. So check in with your local universities program that experience will teach you a lot and get you interested in the subject.

So i'm a junior biomedical engineer and I like the fact that your interested but I wanna be clear it's not easy or at least the way many of the program are set up you need to know a lot about a lot of different stuff. You do stuff that chemical engineers, electrical engineers, mechanical engineers, general engineering programming and design, physiology, and classes from biology. Of course every program is different like my college is heavily instrumentation and biomechanics which doesn't give me a lot of choice for my preference biomaterials and tissue engineering another college your applying to could be different so make sure that comes into your decision for a university.

So first off tell me which science classes you took and whether you feel like you comfortably understood what was going on.

The basics for all engineers is knowing your math, if you flunked out of calc you of course need to take it again, if you go a C and don't feel like you have a good grasp your gonna wanna brush up on it. Math classes have never been my favorite but they are VERY important when you get to higher level engineering classes and classes where they ask you to derive equations. Derivation is never fun but it helps you understand where concepts come from and what they mean I mean it can't just be plug and chug all the time, engineers are creative thinkers.

If I had a suggestion it would be to go to a community college if you have them there. The college is cheaper and let you make your own schedule so two or three courses a semester. Make sure to always stay on top of things and remember the point is to learn and go to a 4 years university. Of course my only warning about community college is that you need to complete the right courses and not waste your time, make sure your courses transfer and transfer correctly and actually apply to your agree... this screwed me over.

I need more specifics about what basics you think you need to work on, if you mean basics of BME, electrical, or mechanical tell me and tell me if you have some experience in those areas.

If you have no idea which course to do then I think that suggests University isn't actually that important for you. Sure, you might feel like society's expectation is for you to get a degree, but it has to be relevant to what you want to do in life.

My advice would be to try different fields of work. Find one you love, and if extra study is a requirement (either for entry or progression), then it'll be a much more meaningful step to take.

Also, some old-man wisdom. It's easy to get the impression that you're flapping around without direction while everyone around you seems to be making huge strides in their lives. But honestly, you're not alone. Many people - hell, I'm going to stick my neck out and say MOST - don't know for certain where they're going with their lives. I suppose what differentiates people is how much they worry about this. 22 is still very young in the big scheme of things. Don't worry, just try things out and find something you enjoy doing - preferably something that also pays the bills.

AstroSmash:

Now, at the age of 22, I want to go to University again and really make it worth my time. However, I have no idea what I want to do (I would love to study physics, but I'm definitely not fit for that). Also, I have to support my family, which is annoying, but it's not the end of the world. It's also a reason why I need to have everything thoroughly planned out and I have to extensively study ahead in order to have time for a part time job.

How did you guys figure out what you wanted to do?

I'm grad school, so I'm not yet doing what I want to be doing, but I've found I figured out what I wanted by trying a bunch of things during my undergrad.

Students who have very clear career goals hate that B.A. requirements ask them to take a variety of gen-ed courses, but the reason for all the gen-eds is to expose the student to a number of disciplines that they can then choose to pursue further.

You were talking about community college, which I would not recommend unless you have a real career plan. If you know what you want, you can get courses for cheaper, but otherwise too many people treat it like High School part 2, and thus miss out of the benefits of the college atmosphere.

If you want to go to college, go to a four year school and immerse yourself in the experience. Start in a bachelor of science program, and see which classes create the most passion. Part of University life involves the environment of higher education and the connections you make.

Now, if you can't do that because you have to support your family, then maybe you can try taking a bunch of science gen-eds at the local community school, and when you have a true passion, pursue a better institution.

I don't know your financial situation, or even where you live, but I know in the United States somebody with no real financial assets is eligible for government education grants - for the time being at least, the Republicans don't like that. Also, there are plenty of scholarships out there for a grand or two that you can apply for.

I paid for my undergrad with about half financial aid, and the other half by working a campus job, and then I supplemented that with the odd scholarship an organization would award me. I ended up debt-free after five years, so it's possible.

 

Reply to Thread

This thread is locked