It feels like people around my age are falling through the cracks of society

 Pages 1 2 3 4 5 NEXT
 

As someone who is currently 20 and looking to finish up his college degree in the next couple of years, it feels like people around my agre are really ending up on the short end of society's stick. I mean based on what I'm hearing, it really feels like college degrees are barely worth the paper they're printed on nowadays, an that unless you are looking to go into certain very-specific fields, you're just going to end up back at Walmart indefinitely anyway. It really feels like the only choices right now are between "career that will make you miserable for your entire working life" or "not being able to support yourself." I mean when it feels like those are your only two choices, how am I supposed to stay motivated? How am I supposed to remain optimistic? What is a person like me even supposed to do?

I take it you mean US society? If so...yeah.

I think you're supposed to totally ignore the reality of the situation...that's why they call it "the dream".

But the system is failing large numbers of people, and there isn't any real answer. Even pointing out the problem pisses people off no end.

Seek therapy, for one, since it seems like you might be heading towards dark places and could use a little cheering up and reframing of your life, choices and possibilities.

As for the rest, I really frown on saying "woe be me, the young person! It is my age range, and not the senior citizens, who are falling through the cracks of society!" because yeah, senior citizens have it far worse. At least you can work at Walmart, McDonalds or a cubicle, and make enough money to support yourself. And you have, you know. Health and a strong, able body (and if you don't, you are still a healthcare priority before the elderly).

But yeah, I suppose saying "they have it worse!" isn't very helpful. I just really disapprove of pretending that one's own problems are the absolute worst (I think drama should be rationed according to severity, not according to how much it personally affects you. Otherwise everything would be 100% dramatic 100% of the time. And I can't take that much drama).

But yeah, look, nobody's asking you to devote your life to something you don't enjoy doing. Just pick a degree that will let you live comfortably (Medicine, Law, Nursing, something Science-related, Business (or Administration), etc), perhaps after seeing a career counsellor, and then find what you truly enjoy doing, what makes your life worth living, and do that in your spare time. Even if you work 10 hours a day, that still leaves you with 4 to 6 hours a day to do what you love.

College degrees do not guarantee a job. There are far fewer good jobs than qualified people who want them, and there always will be, no matter how ideal a society one lives in or how exclusive the qualifications are. This means that in order to get those jobs, you have to be well-connected or willing to work harder than all the other people who want them. It also means that your degree is only as good as the effort you're willing to make in addition to getting your degree(s).

This is disheartening, but once you (1) understand this and (2) stop feeling discouraged by it, you can work towards being one of those people. The nice thing is that you can't really be late to the party here. I didn't start really trying to do something with my life until I was something like 27. I also, before that point, never imagined myself being able to sustain the hours I'm putting in for as long as I have. What I didn't realize is that when you've made the decision to drive your life forward like this, you don't care about any of that because you feel like you're determining its course, and that is a very empowering feeling.

There are sacrifices, to be sure, and it might not be for everyone. For my part, if it comes down to a choice between stagnation with leisure time and hard work with a good career, I've had enough of the former to know that I never want to go back to it ever again.

Well, I guess I know that feeling bro....errr...kinda. When i graduated, my field practically dried up overnight when the US economy tanked (for a long time i felt that my degree was useless...still kinda is in all honesty). Spent a half a year just applying to jobs and going on interviews. Went on so many interviews that i needed a full time job to cover interview expenses. Ended up working a minimum wage job for 2-3 years until i got lucky enough to land a job as an electical engineer making 14 dollars a hour (not exactly my field of study, but to them any engineer was close enough). Now I have a few years experience under my belt and in a better position to apply to an entry level position or at least a technician position and maybe make 30k a year.

Also, you know there is nothing wrong with learning a trade right? They make a decent living and the work can be quite rewarding, and they are usually in high demand. I know the US likes to push everyone towards a college degree and looks down upon the trades, but as someone who has worked alongside electricians, plumbers, welders, and such there is nothing wrong with those lifestyles. And you can take pride in your work as you will directly help to create actual physical objects/buildings.

Also if you do go for a college degree, for the LOVE OF GOD, get an internship or some practical experience. I wish I knew how important that was when i was in college.

Sutter Cane:
As someone who is currently 20 and looking to finish up his college degree in the next couple of years, it feels like people around my agre are really ending up on the short end of society's stick. I mean based on what I'm hearing, it really feels like college degrees are barely worth the paper they're printed on nowadays, an that unless you are looking to go into certain very-specific fields, you're just going to end up back at Walmart indefinitely anyway. It really feels like the only choices right now are between "career that will make you miserable for your entire working life" or "not being able to support yourself." I mean when it feels like those are your only two choices, how am I supposed to stay motivated? How am I supposed to remain optimistic? What is a person like me even supposed to do?

While i can't speak for the US it often depends on the type of degree. As an example over here there are too few engineers and having a degree in engineering almost guarantees good paying jobs. Meanwhile if you look at arts, philosophy, history, psychology or even economics degrees it's a different story.

So in a sense it depends on what you're interested in. If you're interested in non-demanded fields you're screwed otherwise you're lucky.

So long as your college degree is for something practical and not something akin to "yoga instructor" or "personal wellness expert", then it'll at least be worth the paper it's printed on. You don't want that Walmart job. I had it and that company makes a point of keeping its workers below the poverty line. Raises are mandatory there, sure, but hours are not. Make more per hour = less hours you'll get, put simply. I for one would welcome a minimum wage increase to $9.00/hr like the President proposed. It'd certainly help my travel expenses with the current cost of gas. But I don't see that happening with our current House. So I can only hope that what jobs I do get can actually pay for themselves rather than leave me relying on family to just pay for gas.

McMullen:
College degrees do not guarantee a job. There are far fewer good jobs than qualified people who want them, and there always will be, no matter how ideal a society one lives in or how exclusive the qualifications are. This means that in order to get those jobs, you have to be well-connected or willing to work harder than all the other people who want them. It also means that your degree is only as good as the effort you're willing to make in addition to getting your degree(s).

This is disheartening, but once you (1) understand this and (2) stop feeling discouraged by it, you can work towards being one of those people. The nice thing is that you can't really be late to the party here. I didn't start really trying to do something with my life until I was something like 27. I also, before that point, never imagined myself being able to sustain the hours I'm putting in for as long as I have. What I didn't realize is that when you've made the decision to drive your life forward like this, you don't care about any of that because you feel like you're determining its course, and that is a very empowering feeling.

There are sacrifices, to be sure, and it might not be for everyone. For my part, if it comes down to a choice between stagnation with leisure time and hard work with a good career, I've had enough of the former to know that I never want to go back to it ever again.

just out of interest can I aks what you did?

Honestly take a trade there is a ton of work for trades people and everyone seems to be oblivious to it despite complaining about needing work. I also find it funny that everyone says we need more jobs but nobody is will to start a business to create jobs. On top of it all we need to start supporting small businesses instead of conglomerates to help create more jobs and a more competitive and healthy business atmosphere. Everyone shopping at Wall-Mart costs thousands of jobs a year alone.

Just to add to your worries, our generation also has the task of supporting the pension contributions of the baby boomers at a period where healthcare is the most expensive and advanced it's ever been, and tackling a looming food/energy crisis that will happen at current increases in global population. All whilst trying to avert global warming and restore the economies of the world...

We have been served a shit sandwich, the best option is to get yourself very employable (work experience and good qualifications) and get your feet on the ladder. You don't have to be the very best - just better than the majority of your competitors.

Ryotknife:
Also, you know there is nothing wrong with learning a trade right? They make a decent living and the work can be quite rewarding, and they are usually in high demand. I know the US likes to push everyone towards a college degree and looks down upon the trades, but as someone who has worked alongside electricians, plumbers, welders, and such there is nothing wrong with those lifestyles. And you can take pride in your work as you will directly help to create actual physical objects/buildings.

Gotta agree with this. If I could do it all over again, I'd have gone to a trade school. Was pushed into college by my parents, and pretty much went along with it because I didn't know there were other options. Was basically framed as 'get a degree or work minimum wage FOREVER!'.

Ryotknife:

Also, you know there is nothing wrong with learning a trade right? They make a decent living and the work can be quite rewarding, and they are usually in high demand. I know the US likes to push everyone towards a college degree and looks down upon the trades, but as someone who has worked alongside electricians, plumbers, welders, and such there is nothing wrong with those lifestyles. And you can take pride in your work as you will directly help to create actual physical objects/buildings.

This is part of the problem i think- not enough people are going into the trades and too many aiming for white collar jobs. Its understandable why it's happening though- there was a huge growth in the middle classes in Western society in our parents generation, and so their children have those middle class aspirations, hence they want to go to college to have middle-class jobs. The trades are seen as jobs for the working class so all these people from middle class backgrounds don't go into those jobs. The school system reinforces the problem though- they push kids to get the highest grades and get into college because it looks good on them, and overlook things like apprenticeships and vocational trades.

Hence, there's too much supply of college educated graduates than business demand, and this is further antagonised by the current state of the economy.

Also if you do go for a college degree, for the LOVE OF GOD, get an internship or some practical experience. I wish I knew how important that was when i was in college.

Indeed, but it's bloody difficult to get those sorts of work placements if you don't know anyone or happen to already be taking a business related degree. The education system doesn't really support students in getting those internships either, you're left on your own without much of a clue of how to go about it. And even if you do get an internship, it's unknown if it will be useful or not- student internships here in the UK are known to involve copious amount of coffee making and photocopying, because the employer isn't really sure what to do with you- because they don't really need interns.

unfortunately there are a lot of worthless degrees out there and for those that are valid an employer will often want experience too.
I personally think doing the whole going to school and getting a degree (and a big student loan to pay off) is over rated.

quite a few of my friends did apprenticeships in various trades and are doing really well, a lot have gone self employed. one guy was self employed for 6 months as an electrician then travelling for 6 months. another friend got a job on an oil rig and is doing really well.
so although having a degree can open many doors having a skill/trade can be just if not as good.

Same situation in Japan.
After the bubble in the 90s, the younger generation has been having a sucky time.
Now to top it off, we have sub prime and the 3.11 earthquake.
It sucks because once upon a time it was great to be bilingual, universaty grad, and work in a foreign bank.
Now it just seems like a death trap.

I have some friends now that are skilled in their own unique ways such as translation and proof reading, a magician and bartender.
All of them seem to be having more fun than being a office worker.

Ryotknife:

Also, you know there is nothing wrong with learning a trade right? They make a decent living and the work can be quite rewarding, and they are usually in high demand. I know the US likes to push everyone towards a college degree and looks down upon the trades, but as someone who has worked alongside electricians, plumbers, welders, and such there is nothing wrong with those lifestyles. And you can take pride in your work as you will directly help to create actual physical objects/buildings.

Also if you do go for a college degree, for the LOVE OF GOD, get an internship or some practical experience. I wish I knew how important that was when i was in college.

indeed, there really is this mentality of looking down on tradespeople and i dont know why, it is very rewarding to stand back after a days work and see that you have made something.

in certain fields you can make good money if you are skilled enough, last time i was in america i know the welders working on a nearby stadium were on something like 100 dollars an hour.

Ryotknife:
Well, I guess I know that feeling bro....errr...kinda. When i graduated, my field practically dried up overnight when the US economy tanked (for a long time i felt that my degree was useless...still kinda is in all honesty). Spent a half a year just applying to jobs and going on interviews.

image

Yeah, I began a town planning course back in 2007, we were told we'd be entering one of the highest rates of graduate-employement courses in the university (80% of the previous year had already found jobs in the planning sector) Of course we all know what happened after 2007.

Also if you do go for a college degree, for the LOVE OF GOD, get an internship or some practical experience. I wish I knew how important that was when i was in college.

I support this statement whole-heartedly. You need real world experience in your field. Any employer will view it with 5 times the importance of any degree or qualification. Even if it means volunteering over your summers DO IT.
It's also great for interviews as it gives you a chance to name-drop during the questions and will actually provide a lot of answers for the trickier questions.

There are jobs out there, and the economy will recover, we aren't as bad as the depression in the 1930's; we've seen this all before, and in a few years the economy will improve, there will be more jobs, a decade of prosperity, we'll all spend above our means taking out loans to pay for those shiny new jetpacks and hoverboards, and within a decade the economy will crash and it will all repeat again.

While I was studying for my degree I was regularly told by certain lecturers that I wasn't going to be able to get a job with it, because there are too many people getting degrees and realistically not enough jobs for all of them.

This is why I feel the UK government/education system has completely fucked my generation over, because we were raised to believe that obtaining a degree was the best thing you could possibly do and now we're all in debt we can't pay off because there are a hundred of us for every one position available; so they expect us to take management positions in supermarkets that we could have achieved just as easily by working in the god damn supermarket for four years. (That's not even mentioning the Tories fucking despicable scheme to make people work forty hour jobs for 1.50 an hour.)

I'm lucky in that I have certain specialist skills that I'm currently trying to turn into a business, but I feel genuinely sorry for the people who have nothing to show for their time in education other than a piece of paper saying they're smart.

Speaking as a guy who's never looked for a job with above average pay for more than a week, I feel sorry for y'all.

Edit: It's also mainly the problem of our parents' narcicism. Adults force their kids to go to college, teach them from a very young age that it's unnacceptable to not go. Degrees aren't worth what they're printed on is because that's all most people care about. Getting the papers.

In this day and age, you can educate yourself without going to school, unless you want to be in science/engineering/medicine.

I got kicked out of engineering school, and one of the older graduates has a job now, filling in paperwork from 9-8 or 9. 12 hour shifts, 5 days a week + weekend business trips. He earns around 150 euros less than me after 3 years of experience. He's been looking kinda gloomy the past few months.

Sutter Cane:
As someone who is currently 20 and looking to finish up his college degree in the next couple of years, it feels like people around my agre are really ending up on the short end of society's stick. I mean based on what I'm hearing, it really feels like college degrees are barely worth the paper they're printed on nowadays, an that unless you are looking to go into certain very-specific fields, you're just going to end up back at Walmart indefinitely anyway. It really feels like the only choices right now are between "career that will make you miserable for your entire working life" or "not being able to support yourself." I mean when it feels like those are your only two choices, how am I supposed to stay motivated? How am I supposed to remain optimistic? What is a person like me even supposed to do?

Well that's what happens when (assuming you're in the US) 8 million jobs simply cease to exist over the course of 5 years. Businesses are too afraid to start and/or expand (which means hiring more staff) because they're afraid of getting taxed to death by the democrats. What's the point of trying to start up your own business if you're going to end up paying almost 60 cents in taxes for every dollar of income that you make?

That's part of the reason having a degree is so worthless these days, there just aren't enough jobs to go around. That, and the fact that EVERYONE gets a degree and then expects to be handed a job just BECAUSE they have a degree when a lot of degrees don't really have any applicable job-skills related to them. What is someone going to do with a degree in philosophy other than...go on to teach philosophy? I'll fully admit that I have a degree like that, I majored in English. Not much you can do with that other than go on to teach English. But I have aspirations of becoming a writer, so that's my excuse. Beyond that, my degree has very little to do with the job that I settled in.

It's all about politics. I'm a conservative, a rather unpopular standpoint around these forums, and believe it's the liberal policies that are the cause of our economic woes. When a president is up for re-election and half the people polled while leaving the voting booth say they still believe the problems with the economy are the fault of the president that left office 4 years ago, you know there's something wrong with society in general. If they refuse to hold the people currently in charge responsible for the current mess we're in, then nothing will ever change and things are likely to get worse. And I'm not trying to say the Republicans are a better answer, in many cases they're just as bad as the Democrats. I have a strong belief that setting term limits on Congress would go a long way at cleaning out the corruption in D.C., but good luck getting a term-limit bill passed. Quite frankly, the term "career politician" absolutely disgusts me...you're supposed to be a "public servant", which means you shouldn't be making a career (that is, getting wealthy) out of "serving" the people. In the early years of the US, Congressmen had to keep second, REAL jobs because serving in congress was a civic duty that there was little to no profit in, so during their time off they'd have to go back to their farm or store or whatever and make their money the regular way. But now I'm starting to digress and ramble. My point is that lawmakers on both sides are completely disconnected from the woes that the rest of the population is suffering, all they can see and care about are their own power struggles.

As for "what am I supposed to do?" Endure and hope things change for the better, that's pretty much all any of us can do at this point.

And before anyone bothers, no, I'm not interested in debating politics. The OP asked for opinions on this matter and I gave mine. I know that about 95% of you around here disagree with my personal political leanings and I have no interest of hearing/saying the same political arguments again and again. So lets just skip it and move on with our lives, shall we?

aba1:
Honestly take a trade there is a ton of work for trades people and everyone seems to be oblivious to it despite complaining about needing work. I also find it funny that everyone says we need more jobs but nobody is will to start a business to create jobs. On top of it all we need to start supporting small businesses instead of conglomerates to help create more jobs and a more competitive and healthy business atmosphere. Everyone shopping at Wall-Mart costs thousands of jobs a year alone.

I agree.
I'm in Canada and the 4 years of college or so thing has always been a pipe dream for me. Never gonna happen.
A trade, however is far more viable. So that's what I'm working towards.

It is a challenge to be sure, and one that nearly everyone has to/has had to face, not just those in your generation.

Most people who are hiring these days look for individuals who stand out. Most college students who make it to graduation start waving that paper around like it is a free pass, and not just the absolute minimum requirement. An employer will only be able to give jobs to a limited number of people, and if your resume is identical to 500 others he/she just got handed, it is almost certainly going in the discard pile.

If you want to at least nearly guarantee yourself a job in the career you want, you are going to have to do noticeably more than the rest of the crowd. Be interesting, be experienced, be involved, and most of all, be dedicated.

Many companies offer internships. If one is available during college that has anything to do with your chosen career, TAKE IT.

Many careers have professional organizations associated with them. If feasible, join one, and be active within its ranks. Even if you are not active, the name alone slapped onto the resume helps.

Volunteer for community service, take a part time job (preferably one that provides related experience, but any job will help some), do something and anything that will make you stand out from the rest to the person perusing your application.

As for motivation, I cannot answer that for you, everyone is different in this regard. In my case however it was simple. The only thing I care about in terms of long term fulfillment is being able to make a difference, however minute, for humanity. Combine that with strong technical skills and a love for both problem solving and making things, and a career in Engineering was obvious. The fact that this career path pays quite well is just a bonus for me, but others might consider it a primary motivation.

At least in Germany, a degree is most likely gonna get you a job. If you got no degree, then there is 20% chance that you might be unemployed. If you finished university or the likes, then the chance of unemployment is only 2%.

I looked up and the rates in USA are slightly higher at 3.7 with a Bachelors degree. Of course, it depends whether you finished Arts or or did something like Engineering.

So yeah, I don't think that you should outright dismiss college education. It isn't a magic card into a brighter future, but it can help you get a job. Of course, each person should decide on their own whether a student loan is or isn't worth the risk.

College can be a worthwhile learning experience, but make it as cheap as possible if you do want to go. I'm talking a $3k/yr community college, transfer to $6k/yr state school. If there's a particular place you want to live, move there for a year before you start school so you can qualify for resident tuition. I have friends paying $60k/yr for Columbia and NYU, and they are fucking insane. Debt like that essentially makes you an indentured servant. The scariest part is that student loan debt is now being packaged and sold just like subprime mortgages were, so it's not unlikely we'll suffer another collapse like 2008 in the next few years.

You could go to a trade school instead, or major in something that makes money but that you may not like. Learning a skill like programming, graphic design, writing, etc can be good because your portfolio matters more than your credentials, and you can learn them for free on your own. I dunno. It's up to you. Ymmv.

Me, I've just gotten used to being broke, honestly. I don't mind it. I can live on $20k/yr in New York because I don't give a shit about buying things. Participating as little as humanly possible in consumer culture and encouraging others to do the same has become one of the most important and vital acts of civil disobedience in our day and age. Meanwhile, I'm learning C++ and JS. They're interesting and potentially useful, both for "job prospects" and real-world work.

I know where you're coming from, though. Our generation basically grew up being told that a degree was the pathway to "the good life," and that without one, we'd be fucked. Post-2008, it's becoming increasingly clear we're probably fucked either way. What's saddest is that with so many degree-holders and comparatively few jobs that actually require the skills taught in most majors, tons of jobs that shouldn't require degrees now do because, hey, why not? There's no shortage of applicants. I've seen coffee shops that "require" a bachelors.

Only other advice I can give you is don't get sad, get angry. The system is rotten, but there's still hope we can change it. Maybe not much hope, but I think it's there.

The unfortunate things about degrees and tertiary education is that the selection of a field can often be a mistake in hindsight. The jobs that are 'needed' today were not very glamorous, required the individual to slog through long hours with comparably worse conditions and did not pay as much as other positions. Now those very jobs are glamorous, individuals do not have to work longer hours and they can charge other people an arm and a leg due to how much in demand their field is. Predicting that trend was possible but such information was not expressed to children and they were encouraged and sold the dream 10 years prior to pursue a different career.

Wanting to be a pilot or accountant due to parental/societal pressure then finding out just how difficult and expensive education for that role is and then how generally boring, unrewarding and stressful such occupations can be is a terrible combination.

The cost to get the education supposedly needed to be successful is crippling, it also prevents the best and brightest from being able to take out another loan to start their own business and potentially employ others. So the status quo remains, so the economy stagnates and so unemployment continues to rise. Maybe when the baby boomers "die off" their jobs will be up for grabs and the present 20s generation can finally be given the chance to contribute.

aba1:
Honestly take a trade there is a ton of work for trades people and everyone seems to be oblivious to it despite complaining about needing work. I also find it funny that everyone says we need more jobs but nobody is will to start a business to create jobs. On top of it all we need to start supporting small businesses instead of conglomerates to help create more jobs and a more competitive and healthy business atmosphere. Everyone shopping at Wall-Mart costs thousands of jobs a year alone.

well, starting a business is bloody difficult here in NY as the state will bleed you dry. It is no surprise that most of the major companies who survive here are mostly ones with government contracts or ones in NYC because they get benefits there. Well, besides major retail outfits like target and walmart, those survive anywhere but yay min wage jobs!

My family (on my father's side) owns a construction business, so I constantly hear about them railing against the democrats in my state and they are always threatening to move to Pennslyvania where the business climate is much better.

nexus:
Same old story.

If you have problems then you're just "complaining" and boy you should be lucky you weren't in your great-grandparents generation, because they had it bad!

Besides, stop trying to get a 1% job, you should be getting a trade.. that's your problem you're just a snob!

(Despite the fact blue-collar/labor jobs are in very short supply too.)

In short, it's not society's problem, it is *your* problem.. so just go to a therapist and get dosed with high-potency psychotropic medication. In other words, be quiet so no one ever acknowledges the problem. Haven't you heard, the stock market is doing awesome!! So shut your face and know your place!

Poe alert.

Interestingly enough that's exactly what people who never worked for their money would say and actually mean it seriously *snicker*

bananafishtoday:

You could go to a trade school instead, or major in something that makes money but that you may not like. Learning a skill like programming, graphic design, writing, etc can be good because your portfolio matters more than your credentials, and you can learn them for free on your own. I dunno. It's up to you. Ymmv.

While this is true I really really wouldn't recommend it I am in those fields and I can tell ya it is extremely apparent who went through school and who didn't because the people who didn't have the worst portfolios that look extremely amateur and they tend to have really bad habits and are just over all extremely underqualified. Not to mention the devalue the people who do know what they are doing cause clients sometimes don't understand the difference for various reasons and just start hiring the cheapest guy who will then make a awful product and spoil the rep of the entire workforce.

McMullen:
College degrees do not guarantee a job. There are far fewer good jobs than qualified people who want them, and there always will be, no matter how ideal a society one lives in or how exclusive the qualifications are. This means that in order to get those jobs, you have to be well-connected or willing to work harder than all the other people who want them. It also means that your degree is only as good as the effort you're willing to make in addition to getting your degree(s).

This would be a fine counterpoint if it weren't for one small problem- In the US colleges and universities routinely make their "sales pitch" by either outright promising, or heavily implying, that their degree will lead to employment with a reasonable wage to allow someone to pay back the increasingly outrageous expenses they paid to get the degree in the first place.

Sutter Cane:
How am I supposed to remain optimistic? What is a person like me even supposed to do?

Take control of your life, and learn to be satisfied by your contributions to the lives of others rather than your material possessions.

Think of it this way: The majority of the American generations before you pursued a war with Iraq in order to feel good about the national penis, and ruined the economy in the process. Thanks to them, you get the opportunity to pursue an enlightened life of asceticism. Isn't that nice?

I'm being a bit facetious, but you have the cards you've been dealt, and at some point all you can do is make the best of them. So do so. And thank your lucky stars you're not pursuing a PhD program.

Oh, and remember that while you can't wipe away college debts by declaring bankruptcy in the US, there are ways to get your student loans forgiven or drastically reduced. They may screw up your credit rating or be impossible if you have a decent job, but even the US government knows you can't squeeze blood out of a stone.

Taking a trade is pretty much the single biggest piece of advice I give to anyone I know coming out of highschool. While there are time I can hate my job, like when I'm tits deeps in mud trying to bail out a trench so we can run cables through it, overall it is a really good job and incredibly stable. I always have to laugh at these people who finish school and then go to uni for another 5 or 6 years afterward. Suddenly they're 25 with no job experience other than waiting tables and they're trying to land a job towards the top of a business cause they think their degree entitles them to it. Meanwhile, I've finished my trade at 22 and have been pulling in 60,000 a year ever since. Then, with the mining boom going on here, a tradesman working out there on a 4 weeks on/1 week off roster can easily be on 150,000. Sure, it's hot, dusty, lonely and shitty work, but that's what you gotta do if you want the coin.

Essentially what I'm saying is that yes, people do still look at the tradesman and labourers as the working class. However, that working class is earning a hell of a lot more than most office workers. In Australia, trades people are the biggest spenders in the country.

The US really needs a good revolution going, seriously, it's screwed enough to need it yet STILL free enough to do it. Lucky bastards, I live in a country where the bad stuff is just really annoying, not enough to really complain, but enough for it not to be good.

I just pray things clear up a bit in the next 4 years.

That way I can start and finish a degree and hopefully come out with some form of employment.

Fatboy_41:
Taking a trade is pretty much the single biggest piece of advice I give to anyone I know coming out of highschool. While there are time I can hate my job, like when I'm tits deeps in mud trying to bail out a trench so we can run cables through it, overall it is a really good job and incredibly stable. I always have to laugh at these people who finish school and then go to uni for another 5 or 6 years afterward. Suddenly they're 25 with no job experience other than waiting tables and they're trying to land a job towards the top of a business cause they think their degree entitles them to it. Meanwhile, I've finished my trade at 22 and have been pulling in 60,000 a year ever since. Then, with the mining boom going on here, a tradesman working out there on a 4 weeks on/1 week off roster can easily be on 150,000. Sure, it's hot, dusty, lonely and shitty work, but that's what you gotta do if you want the coin.

Essentially what I'm saying is that yes, people do still look at the tradesman and labourers as the working class. However, that working class is earning a hell of a lot more than most office workers. In Australia, trades people are the biggest spenders in the country.

It depends. Going uni => desk job is actually a long term investment. It is true that there are some labour jobs which earn more at the beginning but eventually they'll trail behind. It's even a phenomenon which can be noticed inside the office job sector. Consultants and auditors have it extremely bad at the beginning but later on they'll probably earn a buttload.

Most degrees today are worthless. Degrees with a relatively small field applied to them, such as English, end up having tons of people vying for the same positions, leaving so many people screwed. But degrees in the STEM fields are actually in high demand, due to the low amount of people in those fields. The problem with colleges in the US is the fact that we still like to pretend we have a manufacturing base, despite the fact that it moved overseas in the 80s and 90s. We have yet to get acclimatised to the fact that we are moving toward a tertiary economy, but a massive population and mindsets stuck in the 60s and 70s on how education works ensures that that is unlikely.

RJ 17:
When a president is up for re-election and half the people polled while leaving the voting booth say they still believe the problems with the economy are the fault of the president that left office 4 years ago, you know there's something wrong with society in general. If they refuse to hold the people currently in charge responsible for the current mess we're in, then nothing will ever change and things are likely to get worse.

Because it's just that east to clean up other people's messes.

I don't even have a horse in this race (from the UK) but even I can recognise that that was just a supremely stupid statement.

We're in the middle of one of the largest recessions in history and you expect noticeable growth and turnaround in 4 years?

You gon mental son!

The US isn't the only place facing financial hardship. We're being hit pretty hard over here in the UK too. And we certainly don't have a problem with our government being too 'liberal'.

 Pages 1 2 3 4 5 NEXT

Reply to Thread

This thread is locked