"Gamers" Are Still Dead, Y'all

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erttheking:

American Tanker:
"Gamers" never died. We're just in the process of respawning.

And when that's done, we'll purge the political bullshit from our games, and stand vigilant until the end of time to ensure it fucking stays out.

If you really want politics out of gaming, you're basically saying you don't want gaming to be able to portray: Racism, sexism, homophobia, transphobia, conflict between real nations, positive depictions of communism, negative depictions of communism, corporations being the main villain, genocide, nations being exploited for resources by more powerful nations (Imperialism or neo-colonalism), transhumanism, class divide, international relationships, environmentalism, democratic revolutions, or even government sponsored heath care.

That's what it'd really mean to get politics out of gaming, and I'm just scratching the surface.

This is a completely disingenuous strawman, no one at all is arguing for the removal of every political aspect from videogames, no one is arguing to remove the political nuance from Deus ex or FFXIV

What people are arguing is for the hamfisted propaganda and lectures that have no place in art to stay out, if you want to make propaganda then you can make it, but games as a whole have no need to comment on or cater to your political messages, tales of berseria doesn't need to lecture people on immigration policies, bayonetta doesn't need to lecture people on "objectification", hospital sim doesn't need to talk about the benefits or downfalls of socialism, and resident evil does not need to portray racism as anything, mario doesn't need to talk about gay rights

Games don't need to tell a moral message that you find appealing, if they want to something like Bioshock infinite that shows things are not just black and white, that the minority can be every little bit as bad as the majority they can, if they want to show a society where blacks are a violent dominant race they can, if they want to show a world where communism won tehy can, if they want to have a universe where rape is rewarded than they can.

BeetleManiac:

Metalix Knightmare:
-snip-

If I'm so confrontational (and I won't deny it, I am opinionated), what does it say about you that you're still chomping down on the hook?

That I've got time to kill. You've been here for months, I've seen you keep popping up all over the place, and it's only recently that I've started talking to you, and I wasn't even the one who first engaged with you in conversation. That was you back in the Pewdepie discussion.

So yeah, you're still INFINITELY more confrontational than me Beetle.

Metalix Knightmare:
So yeah, you're still INFINITELY more confrontational than me Beetle.

Based on a single sample. I'll take that as a compliment.

I was going to make a Taylor Swift joke based on the title, but then I saw the author was also a Taylor.

American Tanker:
"Gamers" never died. We're just in the process of respawning.

And when that's done, we'll purge the political bullshit from our games, and stand vigilant until the end of time to ensure it fucking stays out.

How? You can't, barring censoring everything that isn't Tetris. Anyway, removing politics (presumably you mean other people's politics) from something is itself political.

Thaluikhain:
I was going to make a Taylor Swift joke based on the title, but then I saw the author was also a Taylor.

American Tanker:
"Gamers" never died. We're just in the process of respawning.

And when that's done, we'll purge the political bullshit from our games, and stand vigilant until the end of time to ensure it fucking stays out.

How? You can't, barring censoring everything that isn't Tetris. Anyway, removing politics (presumably you mean other people's politics) from something is itself political.

Tetris was devised in Soviet Russia, uses several patriotic pieces of national engineering pride as reward cutscenes and only got as prevalent in the west as it did due to weird Soviet-era copyright laws.

Or in other words, you'd have to censor Tetris too.

image

Lady Larunai:

erttheking:

American Tanker:
"Gamers" never died. We're just in the process of respawning.

And when that's done, we'll purge the political bullshit from our games, and stand vigilant until the end of time to ensure it fucking stays out.

If you really want politics out of gaming, you're basically saying you don't want gaming to be able to portray: Racism, sexism, homophobia, transphobia, conflict between real nations, positive depictions of communism, negative depictions of communism, corporations being the main villain, genocide, nations being exploited for resources by more powerful nations (Imperialism or neo-colonalism), transhumanism, class divide, international relationships, environmentalism, democratic revolutions, or even government sponsored heath care.

That's what it'd really mean to get politics out of gaming, and I'm just scratching the surface.

This is a completely disingenuous strawman, no one at all is arguing for the removal of every political aspect from videogames, no one is arguing to remove the political nuance from Deus ex or FFXIV

What people are arguing is for the hamfisted propaganda and lectures that have no place in art to stay out, if you want to make propaganda then you can make it, but games as a whole have no need to comment on or cater to your political messages, tales of berseria doesn't need to lecture people on immigration policies, bayonetta doesn't need to lecture people on "objectification", hospital sim doesn't need to talk about the benefits or downfalls of socialism, and resident evil does not need to portray racism as anything, mario doesn't need to talk about gay rights

Games don't need to tell a moral message that you find appealing, if they want to something like Bioshock infinite that shows things are not just black and white, that the minority can be every little bit as bad as the majority they can, if they want to show a society where blacks are a violent dominant race they can, if they want to show a world where communism won tehy can, if they want to have a universe where rape is rewarded than they can.

The guy I quoted sure seemed to want to. I mean, how else was I supposed to take "political bullshit?"

Then people should say that, not that they want "politics" out of gaming. And even then, when games do have politics they tend to be hamfisted by default, half the games that include elements from my list would qualify. This whole "get it out" prospect seems rather selective. Also odd. I thought the best thing you could be in gaming was pro developer choice. What happened to that?

I didn't claim they did, so why did you bring it up? You don't really seem to be interested in arguing with what I said, but just arguing past me.

Not again. This was bullshit then and it's bullshit now. I don't need anybody telling me what games I should be playing or how I should be playing them. I don't need anybody telling me how I should look at the games I play or how I should present myself in gaming. I can take responsibility for myself and enjoy the content I love my way. But hey, I guess with as little traffic as this site gets these days, what do you have to lose?

This is not maturity, this is the child's version of maturity; claiming that we're now suddenly above such things as violence or comically-portrayed sexuality because we've "grown up." No, real grown-ups simply accept the things they enjoy regardless of what others think while living a balanced life.

I'd wager on any day that the majority of "gamers" do not fit these stereotypes and could not care less if others see them that way. We didn't participate in gaming to be validated, we did so precisely because nobody would validate it. The only way you can rationalize demanding the games industry to cater to your moral sensibilities is if you view it through a lens of conceited entitlement, which was what turned out to the case last time this non-issue came up.

garbage SJW masturbation article.

So I thought to myself "I'll go check on the Escapist, see if it's dead yet"

so... this is what you guys are trying to do to drum up traffic again...

I'm not sure if I should laugh or cry

Dragonlayer:
"So yeah....it's September 26th, 2017, and we have maybe 10 people left on the site: how can we drum up some attention?"

Yeah they're going to have to dry this wood out for a while before trying to start a fire again, it's been out in the rain too long.

What the hell happened to this site? Used to have decent up to date news on games. Now it's just basically the Zero Punctuation page once a week.

E'rybody mad and meanwhile the adults are like "Here come the salty masses, as predicted."

Gaming was a mistake. Honestly.

dragongit:
What the hell happened to this site? Used to have decent up to date news on games. Now it's just basically the Zero Punctuation page once a week.

More or less everyone except Yahtzee was fired or left. Including the tech team so nothing can be changed about the site.

totheendofsin:
So I thought to myself "I'll go check on the Escapist, see if it's dead yet"

so... this is what you guys are trying to do to drum up traffic again...

I'm not sure if I should laugh or cry

Well it seems to be working.

There's lots of replies here.

"As genuinely great as games like Bayonetta and Lollipop (sp) Chainsaw are, we also need to accept that the criticism about the sexuality built into them is valid."

...Fucking hell, no. No we don't. Criticism is not inherently worthy. Criticism is certainly not inherently worthier than the work that spawns it. And part of the reason we're at this particular impasse is that we've gotten to the point where too much criticism is about the unquestionable narrative of the person offering it, to the point that the work itself is almost an afterthought. It isn't really about examination in any credible way, it just says, "this is wrong, there is only one right way, fix it or face the consequences."

It isn't constructive. It isn't about discussion. It doesn't want things to be considered more deeply, and all too frequently the idea that it's about allowing more voices seems to be an out-and-out lie. It only wants it's voice.

It is well and good to have more diverse representation in games, both in the characters portrayed and the people who create them. Support games that offer what you like. It has never been easier to create a game if you don't feel that what you want to see is out there. Support Kickstarters and Figs and other crowd-sourcing efforts that offer what you want to see, or pick up a Unity course, find a group of like-minded people, and make something.

But as far as I'm concerned, Lollipop Chainsaw and Bayonetta and Doom and the like have every damn right to be exactly what they are, and plenty of people seem to like them just so. If you don't, don't play them! Don't tell me the criticism is inherently "valid"- it isn't. It's bullshit. It's hateful and stifling to creativity. It buys into asinine, paranoid notions that game consumers inherently reflect what they play in the worst ways the offended critic can conceive. If broadening the base of people who play games is genuinely the goal, harping endlessly and echoingly on every prominent game that dares offend doesn't send that message- it sends the message of an unwelcome invader demanding that every game suit their sensibilities. That's not diversity- it's fascism.

Deep breath

Look. There is genuinely constructive and thoughtful game criticism out there. And there are certainly incidences where fans of games have gone way, way too far- one doesn't have to search too far to hear stories of doxing and death threats.

But if the greater number of people who play games (now in their 30s, I remind, if recent studies bear out) who are reasonable human beings are unfairly overshadowed and represented by a smaller number of violent, antisocial jerks, it bears recognition that there are also more than a few knee-jerk critics who see in video games, and their audience, a convenient target to vent their hostility towards the world. Inevitably this is where someone pipes up about how criticism of a game is not necessarily an attack on the audience- but if that isn't how it seems to the audience, sometimes that's not the audience's fault. Sometimes the critic may well even be indulging in just that, intentionally, secure in the notion that their barbs will be protected by just this kind of polemic about the high-minded corrective awesomeness of "criticism".

I could go a hundred years without hearing anyone complaining about Quiet's costume in MGS V again, or the proportions of the female characters in Dragon's Crown. Trying to embarrass someone for presenting something you find objectionable is not the same thing as a sincere query. Not everything is suited for everyone- that's part of what diversity means.

This is the one, rare place where the market might actually act as a corrective- and the need to weigh down something like Bayonetta with echoed "scrutiny" speaks of an insecure fear that people buying things they like won't be enough to bring about the critic's will. That insecurity will never be addressed in a hundred sneering accusations of gamer "defensiveness".

I am not obligated to agree that something is "problematic". I am not required to stir myself into apoplexy because of the way a particular character is portrayed. I am not impressed by attempts to guilt me into buying into the "validity" of criticism that does a crap job because it believes it's already been half-done for them, the audience primed to credit all the same shallow pre-conclusions, coached in the same jargon.

If that means missing out on the carrot of some self-appointed moral guardian's respect- what have they done to suggest that I'd want it?

GR8 b8 m8!!!

ToastyMozart:

Dragonlayer:
"So yeah....it's September 26th, 2017, and we have maybe 10 people left on the site: how can we drum up some attention?"

Yeah they're going to have to dry this wood out for a while before trying to start a fire again, it's been out in the rain too long.

I look forward to next week's breaking news article, in which they unearth some nasty tweets about up and coming indie games developer and commentator, Anita Sarkesian, and what this indicates about the entire gaming industry, gaming playerbase and everything to do with gaming as a collective.

*Looks up from Sonic Mania, Rainbow Moon and Stardew Valley*

What's that? These games promote misogyny, sexism and toxic masculinity? Golly gee willikers, I had no idea. I'll stop playing them right away. Thanks for setting me on the right track, mister!

My point is this; video games are so incredibly diverse in story, visuals, theme, tone and gameplay that it's disingenuous to suggest that the medium as a whole is to blame for any of the myriad of ills currently plaguing society. Those attempting to do so are a latter-day incarnation of the moral fearmongers of yesteryear who railed against the likes of comic books, D&D and yes, video games as "corrupting the youth," "teaching Satanism" and "murder simulators" respectively.

I remember having a conversation not too long ago at a barber shop with the female stylist cutting my hair. Turns out she was a fellow geek, and talk inevitably turned towards suitably geeky subjects. When asked about video games, she told me that she sticks to the single player ones, as she quickly grew exasperated at how toxic online players tended to be towards her on account of being a woman. Know what else she told me? That she was interested in trying out tabletop games as well, but the local male players barred her from joining their sessions. Where are all the "Tabletop players are dead" articles, I wonder?

With the American football season starting up, a friend of mine recently invited me to a sports bar to catch a game. I'm normally not interested in such things, but I went along with it on account of it being a good excuse to socialize. When I got there I quickly noticed that all of the patrons were men, some of whom were loud, raucous and decidedly chauvinist in their dealings with the waitresses, from calling them by derogatory nicknames to physically touching them in ways that clearly made them feel uncomfortable. I find it curious how, despite how insanely popular sports is among such a wide swathe of the population, you don't run across any Leigh Alexander hit pieces or Feminist Frequency videos covering the very real sexist issues among certain fans. Society seems perfectly fine with toxicity in other venues (in person, no less), but video games? That's suddenly the Worst Thing Ever.

Does gaming have an image problem? Absolutely, but it's far from alone in that regard. This is an issue that cuts deep to the basics of universal human behavior, and insisting that some virtual women put more clothes on isn't going to fix it. But see, that would require actual introspection and wrestling with humanity's inner demons on a fundamental level, and people are too proud and insecure to face those ugly truths. They'd rather have a handy scapegoat to blame instead.

Neverhoodian:
*Looks up from Sonic Mania, Rainbow Moon and Stardew Valley*

What's that? These games promote misogyny, sexism and toxic masculinity? Golly gee willikers, I had no idea. I'll stop playing them right away. Thanks for setting me on the right track, mister!

My point is this; video games are so incredibly diverse in story, visuals, theme, tone and gameplay that it's disingenuous to suggest that the medium as a whole is to blame for any of the myriad of ills currently plaguing society. Those attempting to do so are a latter-day incarnation of the moral fearmongers of yesteryear who railed against the likes of comic books, D&D and yes, video games as "corrupting the youth," "teaching Satanism" and "murder simulators" respectively.

I remember having a conversation not too long ago at a barber shop with the female stylist cutting my hair. Turns out she was a fellow geek, and talk inevitably turned towards suitably geeky subjects. When asked about video games, she told me that she sticks to the single player ones, as she quickly grew exasperated at how toxic online players tended to be towards her on account of being a woman. Know what else she told me? That she was interested in trying out tabletop games as well, but the local male players barred her from joining their sessions. Where are all the "Tabletop players are dead" articles, I wonder?

With the American football season starting up, a friend of mine recently invited me to a sports bar to catch a game. I'm normally not interested in such things, but I went along with it on account of it being a good excuse to socialize. When I got there I quickly noticed that all of the patrons were men, some of whom were loud, raucous and decidedly chauvinist in their dealings with the waitresses, from calling them by derogatory nicknames to physically touching them in ways that clearly made them feel uncomfortable. I find it curious how, despite how insanely popular sports is among such a wide swathe of the population, you don't run across any Leigh Alexander hit pieces or Feminist Frequency videos covering the very real sexist issues among certain fans. Society seems perfectly fine with toxicity in other venues (in person, no less), but video games? That's suddenly the Worst Thing Ever.

Does gaming have an image problem? Absolutely, but it's far from alone in that regard. This is an issue that cuts deep to the basics of universal human behavior, and insisting that some virtual women put more clothes on isn't going to fix it. But see, that would require actual introspection and wrestling with humanity's inner demons on a fundamental level, and people are too proud and insecure to face those ugly truths. They'd rather have a handy scapegoat to blame instead.

I would imagine the works you're talking about probably crop up on forums focused on Tabletop games and Sporting Codes, respectively. I've read more than a few opinion pieces about some of the shit that goes on in professional sports (and fuck me does some shit go on) in Australia's mainstream newspapers and honestly those articles, the rebuttals and the comments that accompany them are basically the same shit you read on here. Just replace all instances of 'video games' with 'rugby/Aussie Rules/football etc' and you're there.

Weirdly, one place I don't see that behaviour to near the same degree is traditional martial arts. Probably because outside of boxing and MMA they're just not nearly mainstream enough.

The delicious irony is that Leigh Alexander has crawled away to lick her wounds and gamers are alive and well. Good riddance to bad rubbish, as far as I am concerned.

Its been months since a proper game review was published and you still find the time to bring us this.

What is The Escapist paying you for?

Oh no! I'm dead because le gamers is dead.

Dragons Crown.

Am I doing it right?

Metalix Knightmare:

A question: Is this "culture" thing an American invention? I've never felt that gaming is some sort of in-group that is nigh impenetrable by those who come from the outside. I've been a lifelong gamer every since I got NES console back in 1989-90 (and before that I used to play on an Amiga at my uncle's place) and never have I felt that I belonged to any gamer group. And never have I felt that I was missing something crucial to enjoy games.

This idea of the in-groups keeping all the "valuables" for themselves is a terrible theory. Everyone who plays or wants to play video games has an internet access and they are free to learn about games as much as they want or can. And all of it can be done with zero contact to anyone else. This whole thing is manufactured nonsense. Unless you are a person who just can't handle things on your own but always require a chaperone to hold your hand, the entire world of gaming is open to you. You can play with your friends if you don't like the "in-groups". You can play solo. And you can play one-offs with random people who you'll never see again after the gaming session.

This notion that when you start playing video games, you need to inject yourself into "the culture" is such a pot of wet cats that it irritates me to no limit.

Conclusion: Stop crying about the "gamer community/culture" because there isn't one tangible group of people who all share the same values and act like a hivemind. You keep saying that people shouldn't apply the actions of a few to an entire group of people be it some minority or a fandom, so why are you doing it when it comes to gaming? Also, don't go prancing into a group expecting people to just welcome you out of the blue, especially if your mission is to try and change that group. Have a bit of humility and maybe make your own posse with your friends. You don't need to belong to every mailing list and forum to be able to play video games or to get the most out of them.

This. All of it.

I've never really understood just why is it I'm supposed to be a part of some collective "community" - going as far as being responsible for actions of other members of said community I don't know from Adam and have no interest to, in fact - simply because I take part on a hobby for which the only entry requirements are the financial costs of a hardware platform and of the software that runs on it; a hobby that has had an incredibly useful (but to hear some people talk of it, altogether obscure) feature for the better part of three, nearly four decades now, called "single player", that means that if some stubbornly asocial person like my own self wants to indulge in it, they're absolutely free to do so without any need of human interaction of any sort.

All of which, of course, is to say nothing of the fact that participation in any and every part of this hobby is entirely within one's discretion, there being precisely zero reason of any kind one would necessarily have to spend their hard-earned money in any particular piece they find, for whatever reason, objectionable - "problematic", if you will - on any grounds.

Maybe I'm simply too "toxic" to get it.

Squilookle:

NewClassic:
Although gaming is alive and well, the basement-dwelling Mountain Dew goblin teenager stereotype who screams at his mother for "interrupting" his boob-modded Call of Duty match to give him his pizza rolls image others have of gamers is still very troublesome. It's an image we need to resist.

Troublesome indeed- who puts a boob mod on a first person shooter featuring an overwhelmingly male-and-heavily-camouflaged roster of characters?

That's the one question I have about the article, where would the boobs go?
If they're on the character models of the enemies, then who would ever shoot them and ruin a good pair of tiddies?

Maybe the guns shoot out miniature boobs, but they go way too fast for them to be appreciated

They could be skins on the guns I guess? But then you'd be way too distracted by the tits on your assault rifle to focus on the game, and your K/D ratio will plummet

There's gotta be a way to get boobs in that game...

Do you want GamerGate? 'Cause this is how you get GamerGate.

DJJ66:
Do you want GamerGate? 'Cause this is how you get GamerGate.

#GamerGate never died. It's just not as obvious as it used to be...

But we are ever vigilant, opposing political bullshit where we see it.

Too much truth in this article. It's gonna really piss off the dozen or so people still here.

American Tanker:
"Gamers" never died. We're just in the process of respawning.

And when that's done, we'll purge the political bullshit from our games, and stand vigilant until the end of time to ensure it fucking stays out.

I'll remember this the next time you start bleating about "muh freeze peach" the next time some underage anime boobs get censored.

Well it has the same result as the original batch of such articles. If you work for an enthusiast press and you start attacking the people who are ostensibly your audience, bad things happen to your bottom line. It does not matter if you are video games, movies, music or even a hardware company. It is simple business sense. If you are placing your soapbox over the profitability or even the survival of your employer, I am not too sure that you are a worthwhile employee.

It is also funny when certain writers attribute things to gaming media when it is prevalent in culture at large. Yes, unrealistically beautiful women, men (thanks Japan...), handsome men and men built like bodybuilders are common in gaming. They are also found in all mediums of human expression. Idealisation or celebration of the beauty of the human form goes back to Antiquity. Problems in gaming? You are basically asking them to ignore one of the touchstones of human culture. Attractive people are pleasant to look at. They help sales. That is why even your local newscaster looks presentable if not outright good looking.

I'm amazed by the number of people simply unable to tune out messages they don't want to hear that have no actual impact on things.

I'm also amazed by the number of people that will completely shit the bed over insignificant changes that may or may not have happened to games, but think the 'take a knee' protest (for example, feel free to choose your own real-world, actually-means-something subject) is unnecessary or, worse, is a bad thing. And by 'amazed' I mean 'unsurprised and disappointed', which is not how it is usually used.

Arina Love:
garbage SJW masturbation article.

As nicely worded as it is, this is basically what the article is at it's heart - especially with that shot at Bayonetta and LPC.

Critics and SJWs seem to forget that the super-hot bikini mail women and the super buff hyper masculine dudes exist not as a bug or issue but rather as a feature. They exist because their alternatives - the dull, fully clothed meh-woman and then trapped-a-soul-crushing-job flabby dude exist in real life, and are the actual experiences and realities of the people playing games.

If I wanted to see average/below-average women struggling with "real-world" problems and issues or just life in general I could get that by going to the local mall or town square. If I wanted to see average or below average guys struggling with real-world problems and the realization that their existence is meaningless and that they, like 99% of the rest of men in existence, have no real impact on the world or life, I could look in a goddamn mirror.

But if you want to see super-hot ladies doing awesome things while being super awesome themselves and getting what they want, or see badass and/or smart dudes take the world by storm and get everything they want/like (like said ladies)...then you get out the video games.

The things that critics and SJWs want are railed against because ultimately it comes off as wanting video game people to suck as much as real life people do, defeating the purpose of video games.

Mechamorph:
It is also funny when certain writers attribute things to gaming media when it is prevalent in culture at large. Yes, unrealistically beautiful women, men (thanks Japan...), handsome men and men built like bodybuilders are common in gaming. They are also found in all mediums of human expression. Idealisation or celebration of the beauty of the human form goes back to Antiquity. Problems in gaming? You are basically asking them to ignore one of the touchstones of human culture. Attractive people are pleasant to look at. They help sales. That is why even your local newscaster looks presentable if not outright good looking.

Firstly, I'm not seeing anyone saying games are unique in that. That things are present elsewhere does not mean they aren't present in games.

Secondly, I'm not seeing anyone saying the presence attractive people in games are an issue. Ideas of what attractiveness means, sexualisation and so on, sure, but not the presence of attractive people.

Now, I'm sure you could find the odd person arguing either or both those points if you were to go digging, but neither point was brought up by this article, nor appears too much in the usual debate.

Gibbagobba:
I'd wager on any day that the majority of "gamers" do not fit these stereotypes and could not care less if others see them that way. We didn't participate in gaming to be validated, we did so precisely because nobody would validate it. The only way you can rationalize demanding the games industry to cater to your moral sensibilities is if you view it through a lens of conceited entitlement, which was what turned out to the case last time this non-issue came up.

I would argue that being exclusively uncaring of the perception of the outside world is how things like cults get started and draw most of their strength. There's nothing wrong with having confidence in one's hobby, but it's also worthwhile to do some self-reflection and recognize the importance of being able to contextualize a hobby.

I suspect a lot of folks who play games might disagree, not because games need social majesty or anything, but because it would be nice to be able to share and enjoy a hobby with all sorts of people. We're at a point now where folks can talk to coworkers about games, but it could still be improved.

Further, I make no demands of the industry. Just of the community. I genuinely like a lot of games that have some problematic views on sex and race, and that's okay, so long as I also have some awareness about it. It's when games and the games community refuses to admit there is a problem that it becomes profoundly problematic, which is why it's good to do some self-reflection once in a while.

Neverhoodian:
I remember having a conversation not too long ago at a barber shop with the female stylist cutting my hair. Turns out she was a fellow geek, and talk inevitably turned towards suitably geeky subjects. When asked about video games, she told me that she sticks to the single player ones, as she quickly grew exasperated at how toxic online players tended to be towards her on account of being a woman. Know what else she told me? That she was interested in trying out tabletop games as well, but the local male players barred her from joining their sessions. Where are all the "Tabletop players are dead" articles, I wonder?

Man, you nailed exactly what this article addresses in one swing. Nicely done.

Your stylist is exactly the sort of person that the efforts of this article hopes to reach. I want more folks like her in gaming in general, and there are plenty of elements of the community that make that harder. The article asks explicitly to see such toxicity and challenge it. Push back a little, y'know? Without it, folks like your stylist have an aspect of gaming they could love, but can't access because the world around her doesn't want it.

All this article asks is to let the angry, toxic, aggressive idea of what a "gamer" is be quietly buried. Not to bury games in general as toxic. If we didn't care about the hobby, we'd just discard it. Accepting the inevitable response to posts like these is the price of trying to change things.

And if people disagree with that change, cool! Like the article says, all criticisms are valid.

gigastar:
Its been months since a proper game review was published

It's in the works.

RaikuFA:
Dragons Crown. Am I doing it right?

If you're a fan of side-scrolling beat 'em ups, then absolutely. That game is good.

Ogoid:
All of which, of course, is to say nothing of the fact that participation in any and every part of this hobby is entirely within one's discretion, there being precisely zero reason of any kind one would necessarily have to spend their hard-earned money in any particular piece they find, for whatever reason, objectionable - "problematic", if you will - on any grounds.

The same could be said for reading articles like these. They're still a consumer product, much like games. Both have consequences beyond internal context, though, so both are worth criticizing.

But for the most part, I tend to agree. That said, the gaming community is pretty fluid. Fans of more toxic genres (particularly MOBA and FPS games) tend to also be fans of more light genres. It's why moderation used to get harder during the Escapist's MM, when fans of developers would actively feud in threads over the validity and value of certain devs and genres. So, it's worth recognizing that even if avoiding genres one doesn't like, it's also okay to try to also see value in influencing the community as a whole.

No one is really making demands of the entire games industry, or the entire games community, but rather articles like these hope to push back a little at the behaviors that can harm new players and fans, without having to compromise on quality or artistic expression. There's nothing wrong with sex, which is why only FOX News got upset about Mass Effect, but there is sexual objectification in combat lingerie. Criticizing that, even if it's the only flaw one finds in a game, is still valuable. Maybe not personally valuable, but being able to see that it harms at least someone is good to keep in mind.

In short, making mindful decisions instead of unconsidered ones are what everyone hopes for, and also in hopes that it leads to a better community. Though everyone's definition of "better" may vary, the important takeaway is to see any criticism as valid, even if not holistically valuable.

DrownedAmmet:
Maybe the guns shoot out miniature boobs, but they go way too fast for them to be appreciated

They could be skins on the guns I guess? But then you'd be way too distracted by the tits on your assault rifle to focus on the game, and your K/D ratio will plummet

There's gotta be a way to get boobs in that game...

This is the discourse I was really hoping this article would spark. Speculation on the artful inclusion of breasts in context to modern military combat.

McMarbles:
Too much truth in this article. It's gonna really piss off the dozen or so people still here.

Thanks for saying so, but despite what I'm sure many found, there was very little intent to just piss folks off.

NewClassic:

gigastar:
Its been months since a proper game review was published

It's in the works.

While your attention is here anything to say about the utter lack of even secondhand coverage of Gamescon and TGS?

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