Imitation is the Sincerest Form

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Okay, So you're right that (at least under US law, I suppose), Square was well within it's legal bounds in shutting down this operation. However, this is precisely where the trade off between monopoly-like rights and incentives for intellectual innovation ought to make us a little uncomfortable about IP. It's not as clear cut as you make it out to be. I expect I'll be posting a little bit about this article in my own little thread in the next few days. This isn't really property in that b/c the stuff is non-rivalrous, and there's no harm for fan fiction sequels. Because there's no cost in producing the fan made game at this point, there's no reason to back property rights that prevent it. It wouldn't hurt Square if it came out, and even if it did, the game would produce a net positive utility IMO.

Ok, I'm just gonna throw my 2c into this.

I do believe in the right to protect ones intellectual property, however, I feel that the way that SE handled the situation was wrong and immoral. and I don't want to hear abunch of pro-Ip people yelling either.

I feel that we have reached a time where people should be encouraged to make fan fiction with all tools available. Even SE gives the green light on Fan Fiction. The fan written story of what happened to Aerith from FFVII was praised by SE. So why not this.

Ok I'm done.

Flying-Emu:

Nimbus:
This is the most subjective article I have ever seen on the escapist, and also the one I disagree with the most.

Most subjective, yes.

I agree with it totally. Why should this company be forced to share their IP with the modding community against their wishes? It's their product; they may do what they wish with it.

Admittedly, it was a dick move on Square's part. However, it's completely within their reign of power, and I would probably have done the same were I in their position.

exactly. They should have known it was coming and if not that is their fault. Essentially they had no creativity on their own to create something new. Why should they be able to use SE's stuff without permission? Last I checked that was stealing. They got what they deserved IMO

One does not need permission to legally make derivative work as long as what one does qualifies as fair use. In the case of this game, they didn't actually steal anything--it's a mod that you patch onto the full game. It never actually takes anything out of their product and calls it new (and even if it did, it could still qualify for fair use). This isn't theft in any way. It merely gives the ideas of the game a different light.

The idea that people deserve complete and total control over the very way their intellectual property is looked at is the very reason why our intellectual property laws have become abominable failures. They are unnatural and outdated. That, if anything, is what my years of studying new media at a university have taught me.

If you want to read into it, The Economy of Ideas would be a good place to start.

When a Nascar driver gets in a wreck, unless it cripples them so they can never drive again, generally they hop right back in the driver's seat.

For years, the Cease & Desist has been used as a scare tactic against fan projects like this and nothing else. And most companies eventually learn that pursuing this sort of endeavor is costing them more money and effort than they would recoup from whatever potential lawsuits would come of it.

Most notorious is FOX. There's a whole term out there - one that's long since died out - called being "FOXed". The term arose after FOX shut down an Aliens-themed Quake 1 mod. FOX was also notorious for shutting down any and all fansites for The Simpsons, regardless of content or context. Paramount was also guilty of this with regards to fansites for Star Trek.

Eventually they gave up, because it just wasn't worth the effort. The amount of money gained from a lawsuit over something like a Chrono Trigger ROM hack would most likely not even be enough to cover court costs. Square-Enix would literally be throwing $15,000-$50,000 down the drain to stop something that was never really a threat to begin with. And I'm sure they know that - which is why the Cease & Desist is worthless. It's like some guy telling "Stop! I've got a gun!" when all he has is a toy that shoots foam darts. They're just trying to scare people away.

Other companies are more progressive. Sega has turned a blind eye to fan projects for over ten years, which has blossomed in to a thriving community dedicated to hacking Sonic the Hedgehog ROMs and developing fangames made in C++. This sort of stuff is basically just fanart and fanfiction but applied to the space of gameplay, and wasting your time trying to stop it is telling your fandom to stop being fans.

Sean Sands:
Imitation is the Sincerest Form

The guys who made Chrono Trigger: Crimson Echoes should've seen Square Enix's cease and desist letter coming a mile away.

Read Full Article

This is a narrow-minded article that left a permanent palm imprint on my face, and there aren't enough words to fully explain my contempt for what's being said here. Square Enix did not protect their assets. They led a personal attack on their fanbase which is only going to harm them. However you want to justify Square Enix's legal rights, and even those aren't 100% clear, it's a stupid move from a business perspective. Allowing it would NOT set some dangerous precedent - it would set a useful one. Giving fans confidence and justification for putting hours of their lives into making alternate content that does nothing but promote the brand is a win-win situation.

The fans were just filling a demand that Squeenix wasn't, and it served to benefit Squeenix.

It doesn't come off as some cartoony cliche to me. It comes off as unadulterated stupidty. And I have no sympathy for the fans who made this game either, as they should definitely have fought to release their fan game.

By the way, it's a misconception that copyright is made to protect private business. It's meant to fuel science and art - it's a tool to increase innovation and creation of original works.

I hope more and more people became aware of misfortunes that strict enforcement of copyright cause. Maybe that way, we can get a blanket law that protects all fan-created non-profit work under the "fair use" rule. And the punishment of stupid companies that abuse and misuse DMCA takedown notices would be ideal as well. It's time to start protecting consumers, who stand by ignorantly as their rights are taken away. Corporations have more than enough protection for no apparent reason, and it's ruining the very point of copyright. Even many people well-versed in copyright will tell you that whole system needs to be restructured.

Is it a problem that I double posted? It was unintentional.

G-Mang:
One does not need permission to legally make derivative work as long as what one does qualifies as fair use. In the case of this game, they didn't actually steal anything--it's a mod that you patch onto the full game. It never actually takes anything out of their product and calls it new (and even if it did, it could still qualify for fair use). This isn't theft in any way. It merely gives the ideas of the game a different light.

As far as I know, this isn't true, unfortunately. Fan-created content does not fall under the "fair use" umbrella. Content creators can (and should) choose to turn a blind eye to it, but they are also within full legal rights to take action (which is a dire and pathetic consequence of the current misuse of copyright).

They wait at the very last moment to release a cease & desist letter to the developers of a fanmade game, a game that was made without copyright claim or intent to make profit. They decided to pass on their chance to recognise good story telling talents and to give a chance to some noobs to start a gaming carrer.

It's not like Square Enix's going to lose their goose that laid Golden Eggs (Chrono Trigger) because of a fan project. This is what's wrong with the video game industry. I know that they're only protecting their assets against a potential threat but the fact that they're acting like Madagascar in the game Pandemic 2 is just disturbing.

"I heard that fans are using our pixels and sounds to create a role playing game based on one of our fantasy setting."
image

I guess some people are going to say that "the law is the law!" and I can't really say anything against that... except that I'm the law and it's now illegal to buy Square Enix games.

Trouble with the browser. Sorry for the double post.

I would have played that dammit! I wonder why Squenix allows for a game like Final Fantasy Endless Nova to be released as freeware. Doesn't use any art assets from their games but it plugs the FF name on it with no regard whatsoever.

aprilmarie:

Flying-Emu:

Nimbus:
This is the most subjective article I have ever seen on the escapist, and also the one I disagree with the most.

Most subjective, yes.

I agree with it totally. Why should this company be forced to share their IP with the modding community against their wishes? It's their product; they may do what they wish with it.

Admittedly, it was a dick move on Square's part. However, it's completely within their reign of power, and I would probably have done the same were I in their position.

exactly. They should have known it was coming and if not that is their fault. Essentially they had no creativity on their own to create something new.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shakespearean_history

Western civilization begs to differ on the point that if you don't create something new, you have no creativity.

Why should they be able to use SE's stuff without permission? Last I checked that was stealing.

Maybe you should check again: SE is a holding corporation. Maybe the laws for stealing from artificial persons that are a creation of the law should be different than the laws for stealing from real human beings.

Hath not a holding corporation eyes? Hath not a holding corporation hands, organs, dimensions, senses, affections, passions; fed with the same food, hurt with the same weapons, subject to the same diseases, heal'd by the same means, warm'd and cool'd by the same winter and summer as a natural person is? If you prick a holding corporation, do we not bleed? If you tickle a holding corporation, do we not laugh? If you poison a holding corporation, do we not die? And if you wrong us, shall a holding corporation not revenge?

In short, no. I don't know enough about Japanese corporate law to say what the rights of creative employees are, but under American corporate law, this is how crazy the issue of stealing artistic IP from a company can get--a record company once sued a singer/songwriter no longer working for that company for sounding too much like the guy on the recording the record company owned, that guy being the guy himself :

http://kwartlerlaw.com/Commentaries/wddyh.html

An example of how it should be done: http://www.teamfortress.com/post.php?id=2479

(yes, they're actively supporting FAUCet, a group of fans copying/making caricatures of valve games)

http://forums.tigsource.com/index.php?topic=6099.msg201298;boardseen#new

Maybe not the best example to give critism on squenix, but still...

sneakypenguin:
but no ones buying the "original" game here though, kinda like taking someones engine without permission. If this was a direct mod of a game requiring the original to play I would have no issue here, but since it's a hack of the game it's ground that Square prolly doesn't wanna go. Allow this then do we let someone make a new game with FF7 code? That's the thing here yes TES HL and such where popular cause of mods, but this IMO doesn't quite fit the definition. This would be like someone taking source and making a fan version of Ep 3 in a few years(for free DL)

Do you really think Square-enix will *lose* sales because of a Chrono Trigger mod? That's like saying J.K. Rowling is losing money because of all the Harry Potter fanfiction.

IP is not sacred, never has been and never will be.

Anonymouse:
So change a few names. Its now Kronus Trigger change all the char names slightly and change all the sprites. For example a new hair colour... Then release it and don't even give square any credit.

seconded

Irridium:
Wait wait wait, they were working on it for 4 years and no one even bothered asking square if it was ok?

They didn't think that they would get told to stop, even though they took assests from the games without asking?!

Thats like taking my car without even asking, and painting over it with differant designs.
Sure, tehn end product may be cool, and no one gets hurt, but you still steal my damn car and paint it without my permission.

Are people really this stupid?

It's called "Pimp My Ride".

Really though, should've left out the "Chrono Trigger" in the title, likely to have pulled less attention towards it.

'Setting a dangerous precedent'? It takes a lot of skill to make something that approaches the quality of the official product, and as such fan games of this calibre are few and far between. I tried to make a fully-fledged Sonic game in the Advance style, and as well as I did for a teenager learning to code from home, I simply couldn't do it. Now that I'm older and wiser I'm going to pick it up again once I've finished uni and not make the mistakes I did before, and no-one is going to tell me otherwise. Why should I be punished because I love a franchise so much that I'm willing to invest a huge amount of my free time into an inferior product that I will never profit from and serves only to keep what I and other fans love about it alive and fresh?

Protecting your assets is all well and good, but who are they protecting it from? The fans who will buy the official games regardless? That is utterly nonsensical. Star Wars was pretty much handed over to the fans, and the official installments have flourished and grown immeasurably. Fan content keeps a series alive and gives it the support it needs, and top-quality fan content contributes to this; it does not take it away. So while Square Enix are within their rights to pull a dick move, they are beyond idiotic to do so.

Mstrswrd:
I understand the legality, and lack-there-of, but my only problem is that it was probably going to be really good. In this case, couldn't Square, oh, I don't know, give them, instead of a "cease and desist," a, "Come into talks with us?" kinda thing? What I mean is, they could look at the game, and, if it really is quite as awesome as it sounds like it was going to be, basically say "Alright. You guys walked a fine line, but we really like the game. Finish it up, send it to us, we'll add the polish, and then we'll release it on the DS, XBLA, and PSN."

Seriously, that could have made everyone happy. We would have gotten the game, the people who made it would have gotton it released, and Square would have made money, at little to no cost to themselves. And the people who made it would have to accept whatever bare-bones paycheck they might get from Square as a thank you. Then, they should be hired, assuming they don't have jobs in the industry already.

I honestly think that would be the best thing to do, especially after four years of development, but SE was entirely justified because in the end, it was their engine. If whatever the dev team for this sequel was made their own sprites, level backgrounds, etc... there should be no problem, even with the name and characters.

I'm a little split on this article. On one hand, I will protect to the ends of the Earth Squeenix's right to do this. On the opposite face, coming down so hard on them this late in production and doing so without recourse is a little harsh and sudden. So, let's go into some depth on each coin face.

On the hand of Squeenix, this is the law. Regardless of what the fans may want to think, like distributing ROMs of a game that is no longer in production, it is illegal. They are well within their rights of calling on their intellectual property, and Kajar specifically stated in their demo that if Squeenix asked, they'd pull. Squeenix asked, they pulled. I see this as a no-harm, no-foul situation since Squeenix has both the common sense and the law on their side. Considering Chrono Trigger was recently released on the Nintendo DS, this could effectively alter sales on a game that is still currently in production. This ROM is calling for an increased distribution of ROM files, well over 99% of which will be illegal. Squeenix was both within their rights, and simply just right, to do this. (Also, footnoting this to say that if Kajar was trying to sell this ROM-Hack, the I'd have to say Squeenix did the right thing, no question.)

On the opposite face, Kajar Labs was making a fan-project, certainly one that was extensive and times-taking, and had a lot of effort put into it. It was a very well-polished labor of love that was put to sleep simply because it had the cast-and-crew copy-pasted from another project. Granted, that other project was already copyrighted and patented, but still... I feel for them, but I have to give author Sean Sands credit where he's due. It would've behooved Kajar simply to work with a medium that wasn't Chrono Trigger. It would've meant having to build their own system from the ground up, but it makes sense for them to do that to begin with. I feel for them, and especially for the years of work that went into this, but I can't help but feel like this could've been avoided.

One thing I'm going to boggle at in this post are the fans. Never before have I seen a group of people so determined to have a double-standard for fan work in general. How is it that people who write fan-fics are cretins, but people who do fan-games are the oppressed kind who are too often kicked to the curb in the name of self-absorbed corporate wallets.

Simply put, this was a seemingly good project based on a questionable idea. Also, I'd have to wonder whether or not Squeenix had something like this going on behind the scenes, that still hasn't been aired. Given that Chrono Trigger saw a recent release, it isn't a very large stretch that they did it for a reason.

So sorry, Kajar, but I'm going to have to ultimately side with Squeenix, but with a hearty "Well, that was unnecessary..." note to Squeenix for going about a reasonable action using such unreasonable school-yard bully tactics.

It wasn't a mod though - as people are trying to point out - they completely altered everything to create a whole new game using the code and art assets from Squares original title - how people can defend them is beyond me, at the end of the day they are taking Squares creations and using them without permission. If I was an artist and I saw someone suing my work without my permission, regardless of profit, I'd be angry.

OT : I reached my 3000th post without even realising...neat...

D_987:
It wasn't a mod though - as people are trying to point out - they completely altered everything to create a whole new game using the code and art assets from Squares original title - how people can defend them is beyond me, at the end of the day they are taking Squares creations and using them without permission. If I was an artist and I saw someone suing my work without my permission, regardless of profit, I'd be angry.

OT : I reached my 3000th post without even realizing...neat...

That I think is where square has the right. The developers used squares code and graphics it is not a fan project written from the ground up with squares name on it. It is a complete copy of the rom with changed story plot etc. etc.

I will say yes it sucks that they spent 4 years on the game only to have a cease and desist order handed to them but it is well within squares rights. As other have said it would be like someone taking the files from any Final Fantasy game changing the story and releasing it unlike mods where you need the original game to play it you do not with this rom game all you need is the rom that they would have distributed.

This is especially pertinent with squares release for the DS. Hopefully square will at least look at what the group had done and maybe work something out with them. But if not that is their decision.

NewClassic:
I'm a little split on this article. On one hand, I will protect to the ends of the Earth Squeenix's right to do this. On the opposite face, coming down so hard on them this late in production and doing so without recourse is a little harsh and sudden. So, let's go into some depth on each coin face.

On the hand of Squeenix, this is the law. Regardless of what the fans may want to think, like distributing ROMs of a game that is no longer in production, it is illegal. They are well within their rights of calling on their intellectual property, and Kajar specifically stated in their demo that if Squeenix asked, they'd pull.

midpipps:

That I think is where square has the right. The developers used squares code and graphics it is not a fan project written from the ground up with squares name on it. It is a complete copy of the rom with changed story plot etc. etc.

I will say yes it sucks that they spent 4 years on the game only to have a cease and desist order handed to them but it is well within squares rights.

The question if whether those "rights" are appropriate for this day and age regarding a holding corporation.

How can an entity without an intellect hold an intellectual property on the same basis as a natural human being?

D_987:
It wasn't a mod though - as people are trying to point out - they completely altered everything to create a whole new game using the code and art assets from Squares original title - how people can defend them is beyond me, at the end of the day they are taking Squares creations and using them without permission. If I was an artist and I saw someone suing my work without my permission, regardless of profit, I'd be angry.

That's the point--the artists are not seeing anyone use their work without permission. I don't know the details of the labor contracts at Squeenix, but, I doubt the artists have any other arrangement besides all of their work being the property of the holding corporation as soon as they create it.

Cheeze_Pavilion:

The question if whether those "rights" are appropriate for this day and age regarding a holding corporation.

How can an entity without an intellect hold an intellectual property on the same basis as a natural human being?

I think that it's an insidious idea that because the art, music, and engine for interaction of this game are owned by a group of people collectively rather than by one or two sole creators means that legal protection should be frowned upon. It seems to be neglecting the fact that all of this was originally made by actual people.

If you need 'natural human beings' to sympathise with, then may I reccomend the following:
Producer -
Kazuhiko Aoki

Director -
Takashi Tokita
Yoshinori Kitase
Akihiko Matsui

Character Design -
Akira Toriyama

Supervisor -
Yuji Horii
Hironobu Sakaguchi

Music -
Yasunori Mitsuda
Nobuo Uematsu

Main Program -
Katsuhisa Higuchi
Keizo Kokubo

Sound Program -
Minoru Akao

Sound Engineer -
Eiji Nakamura

Graphic Director -
Masanori Hoshino
Yasuhiko Kamata
Tetsuya Takahashi

Story Plan -
Masato Kato

Event Plan -
Hiroki Chiba
Hiroyuki Itou
Keisuke Matsuhara

Field Plan -
Keita Eto
Kenichi Nishi

Battle Plan -
Haruyuki Nishida
Makoto Shimamoto
Toshiaki Suzuki

Battle Program -
Toshio Endo
Kiyoshi Yoshii

Field Program -
Kazumi Kobayashi

Visual Program -
Ken Narita
Koji Sugimoto

Effect Graphic -
Yukio Nakatani
Hirokatsu Sasaki

Field Graphic -
Shinichiro Hamasaka
Yasuyuki Honne
Matsuzo Itakura
Akiyoshi Masuda
Yusuke Naora
Tetsuya Nomura
Yoshinori Ogura
Shinichiro Okaniwa
Kazuhiro Okawa
Takamichi Shibuya

Character Graphic -
Taizo Inukai
Fumi Nakashima
Hiroshi Uchiyama

Monster Graphic -
Tsutomu Terada

Map Design -
Mami Kawai
Hidetoshi Kezuka

Executive Producer -
Tetsuo Mizuno
Hisashi Suzuki

Sound Effect -
Yoshitaka Hirota
Chiharu Minekawa
Yasuaki Yabuta

This whole situation kind of reminds me of something from my Survey class. "In 1919, Duchamp made a parody of the Mona Lisa by adorning a cheap reproduction of the painting with a mustache and goatee." Taking someone else's artwork, making modifications to it, then passing it off as your own certainly seems like it should be an actionable offense. If the original creator(s) is(are) still alive, they are most likely going to have a strong oppinion about what you do with their work.

Podunk:

Cheeze_Pavilion:

The question if whether those "rights" are appropriate for this day and age regarding a holding corporation.

How can an entity without an intellect hold an intellectual property on the same basis as a natural human being?

I think that it's an insidious idea that because the art, music, and engine for interaction of this game are owned by a group of people collectively rather than by one or two sole creators means that legal protection should be frowned upon. It seems to be neglecting the fact that all of this was originally made by actual people.

But see, that's my point. The argument in the article is that It's the property of Square Enix, so they're free to 'neglect any fact they want.'

We can't argue that we should give weight to things other than legal ownership out of one side of our mouths, and out of the other say things like: "each company gets to interpret for themselves their relationship with their fans, and ultimately they hold all the cards on that decision."

You can't deny cards to one group under the logic that 'the owner holds all the cards' and then argue that all those people you listed hold a card or two.

an insidious idea that because the art, music, and engine for interaction of this game are owned by a group of people collectively

I don't know what you mean by this--where are you getting the idea that Chrono is 'owned' by any of those people collectively? I thought it was owned by the Square Enix holding corporation--I don't know enough about Japanese corporate law to talk about this in depth, but where are you getting the idea that it's "owned by a group of people collectively"?

Hey guys, I've been following this hack and I'm sad that it was shut down :(

I'd just like to point out that there are quite a lot of bad assumptions in this thread. I don't know where this "They wanted to sell their hack" theory comes from. I'm pretty sure they never wanted to. I should know, I had downloaded their previous hack "CT: Prophet's Guile" and no one had ever asked me any money or donation! (it's weird that Square Enix never shut down Prophet's Guile by the way, that hack was totally complete and released by the same website).

Also they weren't distributing ROMs, the patches were Lunar IPS patches, as said on their front page http://www.chronocompendium.com/ .

In the end, it's a sad news anyway. A lot of people would have played this hack :(

Cheeze_Pavilion:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shakespearean_history

Western civilization begs to differ on the point that if you don't create something new, you have no creativity.

I don't have much to add to the discussion, since most of its already been covered, so really sorry to nit-pick, but I'd just like to butt in to say thats not necessarily a good example.

Shakespeare did not write Pyramus and Thisbe II: Thisbe Goes to Manhatten.

(But now I think about it, I wish he had)

He wrote Romeo and Juliet. He took an old myth, made it younger and sexier, made the stakes higher, threw in the usual 'set-against-the-backdrop-of-a-world-gonne-madde', fleshed out more character and filled it the goona with his own unique language and storytelling.

Shakespeare, and he is not the first or the last to do so, took influence, inspiration, ideas and sometimes even entire plots from those who'd written before him. But when he did, he almost always mixed them up, added his own style and individuality to it, and he never took works verbatim.
Also, he was writing thousands of years after the original in most cases.

Here's the thing people are getting wrong: they wouldn't have distributed the game itself, but merely the changes they've made to it. I'm not sure how that changes the letter of the law about it (in the US anyway), but you'd think that falls under fair use (in our courts it does).

This is really just Squeenix pissing into their own cereal here. I mean, think of it: if a new Chrono sequel came out, the guys so fanatic to put a huge bunch of work and/or wait for a fan-made sequel are the first ones buying the new Chrono game. Nobody's going to think "hey, there's a fan sequel out, I'm not going to get the real sequel".

Armitage Shanks:

Cheeze_Pavilion:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shakespearean_history

Western civilization begs to differ on the point that if you don't create something new, you have no creativity.

I don't have much to add to the discussion, since most of its already been covered, so really sorry to nit-pick, but I'd just like to butt in to say thats not necessarily a good example.

Shakespeare did not write Pyramus and Thisbe II: Thisbe Goes to Manhatten.

(But now I think about it, I wish he had)

He wrote Romeo and Juliet. He took an old myth, made it younger and sexier, made the stakes higher, threw in the usual 'set-against-the-backdrop-of-a-world-gonne-madde', fleshed out more character and filled it the goona with his own unique language and storytelling.

Shakespeare, and he is not the first or the last to do so, took influence, inspiration, ideas and sometimes even entire plots from those who'd written before him. But when he did, he almost always mixed them up, added his own style and individuality to it, and he never took works verbatim.
Also, he was writing thousands of years after the original in most cases.

Like you said: "Shakespeare...took...entire plots from those who'd written before him." I'm pretty sure the people criticizing the creators of this sequel/mod by saying they are 'not being creative' would consider someone taking an entire plot from someone else to lack creativity in their work as well, no matter how much they "made it younger and sexier, made the stakes higher, threw in the usual 'set-against-the-backdrop-of-a-world-gonne-madde', fleshed out more character and filled it the goona with his own unique language and storytelling."

Chrono trigger - chrono-my a**.

What with TEARDOWN ?
Fans from Sweden are trying to recreate SPACE HULK, and they can't release it since GW threatened them, and to this day refuse to form any sort of agreement.

That's much more tragic thing than future of one of countless jrpgs.

What I don't understand here is the difference between this fan made game and the hentai/manga made by fans of a genre extending the the IP's fiction. For example, I'm almost sure there has been a manga made at some point since the release of Chrono Trigger that has Chrono and Lucca doing the nasty, and said manga was probably sold at a small stall in a Japanese comic con. Does Square beat up on those folks as well, especially considering they made some money of an established property? To push the idea further, why haven't they cracked down on anyone that's ever released Chrono Trigger fanfic?

For the most part, I can only wrap my head around the idea that maybe Square is pissed that they ripped the sprites straight out of Chrono Trigger. But Chrono Trigger Resurrection remade the CT world in full 3d, and they were still shut down, but then they were using the same story as Chrono Trigger, so in this case it's a matter of the story being copyrighted perhaps.

Whatever Square's reasons for doing this, and I won't argue that they have every right to do it, it just seems kind of pointless. Would the release of this game have affected their sales any? Would this hacked ROM have reached enough people to matter anyway, aside from the requisite hardcore 16-bit Square nerds? Probably not. And this ruckus would have probably been avoided if all those Square nerds had kept a tight lip on the project. My suspicion is that once the project was nearing release a critical mass of square nerds started tweeting their excitement, it reached the far reaches of the gaming "press", and finally was brought to the attention of the Square Enix Empire, which promptly emailed one of their lawyers to send a standardized cease and desist letter without even glancing at what the project was about. They weren't being douchebags, they just didn't have any idea the project was even in development till then.

In the end, while I believe they had every right to do what they did, it was still kind of a douchey move by Square Enix. Let your fans do what they want Square, as long as they don't make money off of it. Revel in the fact that you have fans devoted enough to a game you made more than two decades ago try to extend the fiction in a way that you never could. Keep this dark, camp corner of the internet happy so that when FFXX and Chrono Cross Trigger come out they'll still be eating out of hand, instead of being disenfranchised.

Sean Sands:
Imitation is the Sincerest Form

The guys who made Chrono Trigger: Crimson Echoes should've seen Square Enix's cease and desist letter coming a mile away.

Read Full Article

And yet, you keepfueling the hate fire. Thanks

Sean Sands:
Imitation is the Sincerest Form

The guys who made Chrono Trigger: Crimson Echoes should've seen Square Enix's cease and desist letter coming a mile away.

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It's been close to a year since this incident. In that time, I read everything that the developers did for the game, creating new tilesets, adding new music, and creating a story that is coherent with both Crono Trigger as well as Crono Cross, to the point that I've actually wanted to play this PS1 game.

First, the law. We understand that the C&D could come and destroy all of their work, which it did. It's unfortunate but there is one key thing that we don't have. Permission. The one thing that these three developers wanted in order to create something brand new. So, my question is this, how are they supposed to GET permission? How is it that they were supposed to create a dialogue with a company that is unreachable except for a job offering in their newest games? Why not have a special license for fans of a work, who aren't showing that they want to compete with a work, merely show a new side to the story?

In all of this last year, we have heard nothing of a new Crono Break. We have heard nothing of a redux of Cross. Merely the same game, Trigger, with a few extra cutscenes. All these cutscenes do is try to segueway Trigger into Cross with nothing substantial to say this series will continue.

And yet, when someone successfully does exactly that, Square threatens them with $150000, for monetary damages. Yes, I went to Youtube and looked up Crimson Echoes. The story, was done exceptionally well and for a fan effort, it was fairly polished. I would recommend anyone interested in it to look it up.

Sadly, this argument doesn't age well. "It's the law" equates to heavy handed bias against new ideas and looking only at what worked in the past to try to milk it for what it's worth.

How ironic that Activision is doing the same to Infinity Ward. Even funnier is the fact that Activision destroyed another fan work that had an even longer cycle who HAD a license and at least dialogue.

What I'm finding is that a lot of bureaucrats in the big chairs aren't seeing the entire picture. The laws are changing to stifle the very thing needed in gaming right now. Innovation no matter where it comes. No matter how great the pro-IP touts the law, in the end, it comes at a price. It comes at turning our entertainment into nothing more than Big Gaming. Hmmm... I should make that a site. See how long it stays up.

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