205: Pastor Blaster

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I'm actually all for people being critical of games.

So long as there are real, fair reasons for the criticism, and 'mature' rated games can be a little excessive on the swearing, I won't say 'unnecessary' because almost everything enjoyable in life isn't 'necessary', but I would say it's 'trying too hard to be cool' when there's excessive sweariness, or indeed, excessive violence, unless it's done very, very well.

If you don't allow criticism of things you love, you're saying you can't see any flaws and don't want any improvements. It's the type and quality of criticism I usually have trouble with, such as blaming 'Mature' games for kids playing them (try doing some parenting, we're already checking ages at stores and simply and clearly labelling the games.) Or saying that virtual guns are turning our children into killers, while supporting real ones with every fibre of your being.

However some things do deserve criticism, certain marketing campaigns (Dead Space 2's 'look how gross we can be, we annoyed some moms' ads are a fine example), certain types of games such as BMX XXX, Dead or Alive Volleyball etc.

I'm just pleased to hear of someone trying games and understanding them, so that when parents turn to them, they can explain that yes, SOME games are not suitable, but many are, and there's a fairly simple guide printed on the box.

I couldn't help but laugh as I read through this article. I've been through a few of those "paradigm shifts" myself in my life(although, not necessarily related to gaming), and, let me tell ya, they can be some real doozies. You have to hold on tight to something, else you may find yourself flat on the floor wondering what the hell just happened to you. It not a fun feeling when the entire Universe shifts few centimeters to the left without you.

SenseOfTumour:
I'm actually all for people being critical of games.

So long as there are real, fair reasons for the criticism, and 'mature' rated games can be a little excessive on the swearing, I won't say 'unnecessary' because almost everything enjoyable in life isn't 'necessary', but I would say it's 'trying too hard to be cool' when there's excessive sweariness, or indeed, excessive violence, unless it's done very, very well.

If you don't allow criticism of things you love, you're saying you can't see any flaws and don't want any improvements. It's the type and quality of criticism I usually have trouble with, such as blaming 'Mature' games for kids playing them (try doing some parenting, we're already checking ages at stores and simply and clearly labelling the games.) Or saying that virtual guns are turning our children into killers, while supporting real ones with every fibre of your being.

However some things do deserve criticism, certain marketing campaigns (Dead Space 2's 'look how gross we can be, we annoyed some moms' ads are a fine example), certain types of games such as BMX XXX, Dead or Alive Volleyball etc.

I'm just pleased to hear of someone trying games and understanding them, so that when parents turn to them, they can explain that yes, SOME games are not suitable, but many are, and there's a fairly simple guide printed on the box.

Well said. This is something I've been trying to tell people for years.

I would translate "trying too hard to be cool" into "childish or immature." If you listen to a youngish (<14) kid swearing, it's humorous how poor their understanding of what they're saying is. In a way, it's almost like the first couple seasons of South Park where the fart jokes and swearing kids were supposed to be hilarious, but were really just juvenile.

Tech Team FTW!:

It is one of my earnest hopes that the demonisation of Christianity, and indeed all religion, may eventually subside through the humanisation of church leaders.

You think religion/faith and the leaders of such are inhuman?

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