217: What Are Little Girls Made Of?

What Are Little Girls Made Of?

For some, Star Trek is an obsession. But for Catie Osborn, it was something more than that: It provided the common ground that helped strengthen her relationship with her father.

Read Full Article

wauw, beautiful story... it even makes me want to go and start watching the startrek series

A wonderful story indeed so. I am very happy to hear such a deep going story and how something that is basicly as old and classic and yet always again new like Star Trek can bring people closer like that.

I enjoyed this little insight and thank you for this light hearted moment. :)

very nice. star trek is not about flying around in space (or at least entirely), it's more about morals and decisions in my opinion. i probably learned more from picard and kirk than i did from elmo and mr. Roger.

For some reason I thought this was going to be a rant about how children can't die in video games.

I honestly started to cry. That sounded like some Hallmark movie, but ya know...actually heartwarming.

That was a brillieant read. Thank you very much for putting that up. I've started watching Deep Space 9 again, and I am thoroughly enjoying it.

PICARDS THE MAN!

That was a wonderful story. As someone who found Star Trek TNG when I was a 7 or 8 year old girl, it would've been nice to have someone else to share that with me. All families have their ways of communicating, and for my mom and I it was often video games or music, but Star Trek in its many incarnations has been a big part of my life for a long time. I recently traveled to Philadelphia in large part because I wanted to see the Star Trek exhibition at the museum there. I actually messed up my timing and missed the museum, so I'm considering a trip back before it closes just to see this exhibition.

This was my favorite piece in the issue. Also, Picard is the natural choice, of course. ;)

This is a pretty touching story. Star Trek, at its core, always struck me as being aimed towards the human condition; aliens, strange worlds and exotic dangers always stood in for the more mundane problems that we as individuals, and society as a whole, faced. It was that perspective of the fantastic that made the examples and lessons easier to accept. I'm glad to see that you and your father found a common interest in the show, and that you have such fond memories of him connected to it. That's a lot more than many others have.

That was a brilliantly beautiful story, incredibly heart warming. Also your favourite episode, the pretty confusing one with Moriarty in the holo-deck? And I prefer Picard too...

wow... what a heart warming story, although i must admit it makes me jealous. I wish I could have had a relationship like that with my dad, but alas he is dead, and to be honest he stopped being my dad long before that due to his depression. But, that's life. Star trek is awesome by the way.

Very moving story. I enjoyed it very much. Thankyou for sharing it with us :)

Amazong story, i dont know what else to say.

truly touched by your story, it almost made me call my dad, but unfortunately i don't speak greek.

I just read Colin Rowsell's article, and thought both yours and his complement each other greatly, like an yin-yang perspective on the whole fan phenomenon.

Beautiful story. You manage to make me curious about the original Star Trek series.

Wow- super-touching story. I loved it!
I have to side with your dad on which Captain is the greatest (I DID write Captain Kirk's Guide To Women), but Picard is fantastic of course!

Such a great article that really touched my heart- THANK YOU!!

Nice story

OK, it's a nice story and it's told well--but how does it apply to gaming?

I ask this question because while I think there's a place for a broad range of stories and moments at the Escapist, because I think that games can touch all of us in interesting ways, this particular story feels all about a personal connection that doesn't provide any reflection to a broader experience of Star Trek and how it affects our lives (in a broad stroke) science fiction, or gaming.

It affects the author's life, most definitely, but I'm not seeing the tendrils that would connect it to the broader audience of gamers that makes up the Escapist.

YMMV, and I totally admit this is my viewpoint only. I could've overlooked something.

Smokescreen:
OK, it's a nice story and it's told well--but how does it apply to gaming?

The Escapist isn't entirely about gaming. Witness the sections on movies, music, etc.

The Rogue Wolf:

Smokescreen:
OK, it's a nice story and it's told well--but how does it apply to gaming?

The Escapist isn't entirely about gaming. Witness the sections on movies, music, etc.

Yeah, which is why I said,
"I ask this question because while I think there's a place for a broad range of stories and moments at the Escapist, because I think that games can touch all of us in interesting ways, this particular story feels all about a personal connection that doesn't provide any reflection to a broader experience of Star Trek and how it affects our lives (in a broad stroke) science fiction, or gaming."

This story does a lot, but it emphasizes the personal and doesn't provide a jump off point to the broader connection.

Thats a nice story, it brightened my evening

Smokescreen:

The Rogue Wolf:

Smokescreen:
OK, it's a nice story and it's told well--but how does it apply to gaming?

The Escapist isn't entirely about gaming. Witness the sections on movies, music, etc.

Yeah, which is why I said,
"I ask this question because while I think there's a place for a broad range of stories and moments at the Escapist, because I think that games can touch all of us in interesting ways, this particular story feels all about a personal connection that doesn't provide any reflection to a broader experience of Star Trek and how it affects our lives (in a broad stroke) science fiction, or gaming."

This story does a lot, but it emphasizes the personal and doesn't provide a jump off point to the broader connection.

I'm going to have to disagree. While the experiences she shared with her father may be unique to her, the emotions that shine through her words touch many people here more than any video game editorial or Zero Punctuation review could ever could (Sorry Yahtzee!). The fact of the matter is that this article DID reach a broad audience. I believe this is the first time that I have ever created an account at 2 AM just to voice my 2 cents on a matter, and goes to show you that writing doesn't just have to be about games. I can't speak for others, but when I come to a game-central site such as this, and find an article with so much heart and soul, it makes me feel great.

My words can't express how much I enjoyed this article, beautifully written and straight from the bottom of your heart. I can honestly tell you that your article is one of the best I have read on the web.

My Uncle shared a bond with my brother and I through means of videogames and movies. He sparked my love for all things science fiction, and I know how invaluable a person like this can be, as a friend and as a family member as well. I'm sorry to hear that you lost your father in almost the same way I lost my Uncle, in a battle with cancer a few years ago. I'm sure he would have loved to see the new Star Trek film too, and I regret that he won't.

Anyways I guess I should wrap this up. Thank you for sharing your story with everybody, it impacts some of us more than you could ever know. I look forward to reading more of your work in the future, please keep up the phenominal work.

Thank you so much!

Actually, thank everyone so much. The response to this article has been absolutely overwhelming--I was thrilled to see that you liked it so much! Your comments, emails (and phone calls) have been much appreciated.

~Catie

 

Reply to Thread

Log in or Register to Comment
Have an account? Login below:
With Facebook:Login With Facebook
or
Username:  
Password:  
  
Not registered? To sign up for an account with The Escapist:
Register With Facebook
Register With Facebook
or
Register for a free account here