221: The Language of the Game

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The Language of the Game

Ever felt the need to shout "ding!" after a raise or a promotion? Then you're already familiar with the concept of "talking in Game." Pat Miller takes a closer look at how gamers are communicating with each other the best way they can: by mining their favorite games for terminology.

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I've never used video game jargon in real life...I feel so deprived...

I can't honestly say that I've used video game speak to that extent in my life. I've used it jokingly before, but if someone had actually said some of those things to me, I would have wondered why they are taking such pains to explain something in such a roundabout manner. Nothing wrong with it, of course (I know people who have used D&D speak to describe real life), but some of the dialogue seems a bit...over the top, in my opinion.

I've woken up on a birthday and said ding before.

Sometimes I'll slip into things like that. For example, once I caught a friend looking at my homework and I called him a screen watcher.

But normally, I use music terms and references in real life. It's always funny to see somebody ponder my word choice when I say fretting or something of the like.

I've... never heard someone speak like that, not even the nerdiest of my friends.

That was by far the nerdiest article that I've read in some time. I'll admit to using game jargon here and there, but not in terms of someone coaching you in fighting games being the equivalent of dating advice. I gotta say...I'm a bit impressed, but extremely bemused. Well said, sir, well said.

Meh. I doubt you wouldn't find the same thing in any subculture. Don't you think musician might compare their relationships to the ease or lack thereof of playing a song, or how different brands of instruments handle? Hell, just a few weeks ago there was an article saying pretty much the same thing about Star Trek, and I only came here to post this because I wrote 'to boldy go' on an entirely different site and reminded myself of it.

Yukichin:
I've... never heard someone speak like that, not even the nerdiest of my friends.

Your friends are scrubs. Tell them to level up.

I've used it constantly, leveling up (improved my life situation), job change (job change), grinding (the 9-5), stick to your own lane (stay away from my customer), mid boss, pwned, noob etc

The Random One:
Meh. I doubt you wouldn't find the same thing in any subculture. Don't you think musician might compare their relationships to the ease or lack thereof of playing a song.

Guy talking to friend about girl he likes, but way over his head:

"Flight of the bumblebee, learn it or burn it?"

I couldn't help but to speak in Game after playing Persona 4 D:
"Hey man, I'm gonna go out and grind my social ranks" (Hang out with my friends)

I find myself doing this often but less with fighting games and more with RPGs or Action games. Just the other night after a session of Lost Planet 2 I mentioned to a friend.

"I swear. this woman is like a green eye. runs in circles but completely unpredictable"

Had a friend who once said over xbl "be right back, going to heal". After relising what he just said, he started thinking he might want to cut back on WoW a bit.

Um, I've been playing video games for 22 years, and I've never had any desire to speak this way. None of my friends speak this way, either. If I ever heard saying anything like that, I think I'd be tempted to introduce their face to my mano de pimp.

Yeah I've never spoken this way and I've been playing games since 1988, nor do any of my friends speak this way. This is... stupid.

RagingScottsman:
I've woken up on a birthday and said ding before.

On my birthday I sung the Final Fantasy level up song.
*hangs head in shame*

Well, not like that really, but I do use games alot to explain things on here. Mostly in a comparitive way.

'Wheres my rag of cleanliness?'.
Most of the time I make a 'nerdy' comment it's an accident. At a certain point games are just so much a part of you that you fail to realize you're doing it at all.

That's funny, because I never talk like that.

I'm a pretty hardcore gamer, I've been known to beat games literally the day I get them in 8 hour+ sessions, but I've never talked in Game. I get the concept, and have even heard some of my friends do it, but it just... never clicked with me.

I guess I use "lol" when I'm watching movies with friends to mean a moment that the movie wants to be funny or surprising but really isn't at all.

Like: Luke, I am your father. "Lol!"

fogmike:

The Random One:
Meh. I doubt you wouldn't find the same thing in any subculture. Don't you think musician might compare their relationships to the ease or lack thereof of playing a song.

Guy talking to friend about girl he likes, but way over his head:

"Flight of the bumblebee, learn it or burn it?"

Actually no.

No musician does that. Ever.

I promise.

Speaking in game terms outside of games is rarely a matter of communicating much more than "I'm a member of this group." It's the same thing as mentioning an in-joke among friends, or slang in any number of professions like sailors or IT professionals. It's frequently too contrived to be useful in and of itself.

ShredHead:

fogmike:

The Random One:
Meh. I doubt you wouldn't find the same thing in any subculture. Don't you think musician might compare their relationships to the ease or lack thereof of playing a song.

Guy talking to friend about girl he likes, but way over his head:

"Flight of the bumblebee, learn it or burn it?"

Actually no.

No musician does that. Ever.

I promise.

Alex, if you're going to quote me, you have to get your act together and give my game back. Otherwise, you have no right to do anything with my words. Oh, and God says hi.

fogmike:

ShredHead:

fogmike:

The Random One:
Meh. I doubt you wouldn't find the same thing in any subculture. Don't you think musician might compare their relationships to the ease or lack thereof of playing a song.

Guy talking to friend about girl he likes, but way over his head:

"Flight of the bumblebee, learn it or burn it?"

Actually no.

No musician does that. Ever.

I promise.

Alex, if you're going to quote me, you have to get your act together and give my game back. Otherwise, you have no right to do anything with my words. Oh, and God says hi.

Well so does ... um. Idiot.

RagingScottsman:
I've woken up on a birthday and said ding before.

I was genuinely disappointed that when I opened my exam results, there was no achievement pop-up.

Oh, come on. It's still English. Other languages have their subculture slang as well. If you ever put that you speak "Gamer" on a resume, you will get laughed at. This really isn't worth writing an article about.

Then it must have been even less worthwhile to comment on! And a comment about such a comment... well you get the picture.

I had a friend open a fridge and turn to his colleague to utter "Huh, someone deleted the milk." There was a long pause before the speaker realized what he had said.

Personally I once flushed a toilet that malfunctioned and I thought to myself, ver betim, "Hmm, that's not the proper flushing animation."

As for the really forced and labored video game speak attempts... lame.

I don't have to force gamespeak. I'm naturally fluent in it, but reign it in to games and contexts whoever I'm talking to is familiar with. Generally, it's more personalised language that a whole "dialect of gamer". I speak in GGX terminology from time to time. Mostly I'm just a tropespeaker. I can use singular trope names as complete sentences as part of a logical conversation with someone unversed in tropes and still make sense.

ShredHead:

fogmike:

ShredHead:

fogmike:

The Random One:
Meh. I doubt you wouldn't find the same thing in any subculture. Don't you think musician might compare their relationships to the ease or lack thereof of playing a song.

Guy talking to friend about girl he likes, but way over his head:

"Flight of the bumblebee, learn it or burn it?"

Actually no.

No musician does that. Ever.

I promise.

Alex, if you're going to quote me, you have to get your act together and give my game back. Otherwise, you have no right to do anything with my words. Oh, and God says hi.

Well so does ... um. Idiot.

Yeah, I thought so.

I use it a lot within my gamer community.
*wallrides away*

...I hate to be too much of a linguist, but jargon doesn't count as a "language."

Well written! Can't say I've done anything like the fighting game analogue myself, but the opening paragraph rang pretty true for me. Sometimes I get a little enthusiastic when I meet another gamer and go off on a tirade, only to realize that other people are looking at us like we're insane. Good times.

ThePyr:
Oh, come on. It's still English. Other languages have their subculture slang as well. If you ever put that you speak "Gamer" on a resume, you will get laughed at. This really isn't worth writing an article about.

Really? Something's not worth talking about if you can't put it on a resume?

Pat M.:

Yukichin:
I've... never heard someone speak like that, not even the nerdiest of my friends.

Your friends are scrubs. Tell them to level up.

LOL. Wow.

Good read, I think it's definatly something to do with absorbing the pop culture and languages (even if created in a game studio) around us. plus you get to be cool in that selectivly geek manner. I think my most common one is f6 (my usual mapped quick save) when I'm about go into something major // tests / sex / night of narcotics etc etc, and f7 when things just dont go right...

I also say things from sci fi too... particluar firefly.. geekage.

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