YouTube Killed the Video Star

YouTube Killed the Video Star

YouTube removes all the fun from suffering through a bad movie just for the few great moments.

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yeah... it wrecked Fight Club for a friend.

Yeah, of course it has for music videos definitely, I'd rather watch the video I want without commercials or in some cases censorship, and not have to watch TV in hopes of seeing said video on the so called "Music" Channels. It also doesn't help that the music I listen to is either very old, or of a genre that doesn't get much if any air play.

I never watch things on youtube before seeing them. Except for The Room, and that was just so gloriously bad I couldn't wait. 'You're tearing me apart Lisa!'

... Yes. What you just saw is real: an unlicensed Turkish action movie wherein Captain America teams up with Mexican wrestling legend El Santo to fight the evil crime-boss Spider-Man. Want more? Try "Indian Superman."

Thats the one thing I'm always embarrassed for being a Turk is. We make unlicensed movies with the most random choice of characters and for some reason Spider-Man is the main villain.

MovieBob:

YouTube removes all the fun from suffering through a bad movie just for the few great moments.

Yes, well, I suppose it was only fair, given what Video did to the Radio Star...

Bad puns aside, I'm inclined to agree. Yeah, there have been a few rare occasions where someone wants to set up an all night movie session of old (but fantastically horrendous) movies using a projector, some canvas (or a side of a house), and an appropriately sparse clearing in the woods (or next to your house), but beyond those occasions, the Grindhouse style in theaters (well before my time but not unappreciated on occasion)is probably on it's last blood-coughing gasp before if forever kicks it. At least, until some quirky directors come by and rez the poor thing against its consent, heaving up its butchered, battered corpse as a shiny beacon of classical resurgence, all whilst trying to claim that as it is now is how it was then...

this just sounds like an annoying hipster/emo/indie saying how he/she/it discovered this great band/movie/cartoon/game which they only like ironically and how they where into to that (ironically or not) band/movie/cartoon/game before it got all popular.

sure, you make some points along the way, but i just cant shake off the feeling that i just willingly listened to you whine about how something got mainstream and now you cant impress smelly women whit your knowledge of it anymore and also because now that people know about it, it sucks and sold out.

Armored Prayer:

... Yes. What you just saw is real: an unlicensed Turkish action movie wherein Captain America teams up with Mexican wrestling legend El Santo to fight the evil crime-boss Spider-Man. Want more? Try "Indian Superman."

Thats the one thing I'm always embarrassed for being a Turk is. We make unlicensed movies with the most random choice of characters and for some reason Spider-Man is the main villain.

Well, not only do you do that, and then have Captain America team up with a Mexican Wrestler and fight with him in a graveyard, but somehow the filmmakers also found it fit to use copyrighted music in the movie. (In a clip reel that I saw, I thought I heard what sounded like a badly-rendered recording of Arcana by Edgard Varèse. It's probably the silliest and most hilarious use of it, too.)

But anyways, good insights, MB.

My problem with 'the video stars' in terms of music videos, is that the music industry seems have entirely forgotten what a music video IS.

It's a promotional video made to advertise music or an artist.

Therefore, surely someone who's willing to distribute it worldwide, to millions for free, they've got to be SO grateful for all that no expense publicity, right?

no, they're stomping around with their lawyers all over the net throwing hissy fits.

It's like if I turned the front of my house into a giant COKE billboard, and they sent their lawyers around to demand I stop using their image.

They really need to realise that most people are not carrying around a laptop streaming the videos instead of buying the music. Sure there's a lot of people pirating the music, but the videos are not the big problem.

I also realise this isn't really what this thread was about, but it made me think of this, so I'm gonna type it anyway.

swaki:
this just sounds like an annoying hipster/emo/indie saying how he/she/it discovered this great band/movie/cartoon/game which they only like ironically and how they where into to that (ironically or not) band/movie/cartoon/game before it got all popular.

sure, you make some points along the way, but i just cant shake off the feeling that i just willingly listened to you whine about how something got mainstream and now you cant impress smelly women whit your knowledge of it anymore and also because now that people know about it, it sucks and sold out.

This. If something is bad, I don't want to watch it. So, I'll settle for just the good parts. If I miss out on some of your nostalgia, oh well. It's not my problem. It's not your problem either, really. You just choose to cry about it.

and YouTube strikes again

Agreed... I watched some of Pulp Fiction on it and it kind of blew everything up for me...

When I saw the actual movie I already knew how awesome Samuel Jackson was and how great the movie was I didn't have to make up my mind on anything...

I've since resolved to never looking at anything I haven't already seen.

Sure, it's all very convenient, and maybe I'm being an old fart about it, but I really get the sense that seeing these things piecemeal with such ease is robbing people of the experience of "finding" them

This is pretty incorrect. I'm a fan of the shitty low budget horror movies and there are tons and tonnes of DVDs lining the bargain shelves. I buy them 5 at a time and there are usually only three good scenes between them.* It's such a rare occasion that I have begun celebrating when I find a truly good movie in all that garbage (like Weirdsville).

* - Here's an example: I just bought 5 movies from my place of business that cost me a pretty penny (Andre the Butcher, Brother's War, Return to Horror High, The Back Lot Murders, and Vampz). Of these 5 films the only worthwhile scenes are Ron Jeremy stapling his severed arm back to his body (Andre the Butcher), a before-he-was-famous George Clooney hamming up his scenes (Return to Horror High), and a character getting his testicles in a vice before getting a "Mexican Necktie" (The Back Lot Murders). Trust me, you can still get the experience of sifting through the trash in the hopes of finding that one good scene if you still want the experience.

I don't think Bob Chipman understands the fine art of "Mst-ing" a movie. Every horrible movie has a reason to be watched (I even own Night of the Lepus), and that reason is to remember our lord and saviors Tom Servo, Crow T Robot, and Mike Nelson. (And Joel, if you're into him I guess)

Furburt:
I never watch things on youtube before seeing them. Except for The Room, and that was just so gloriously bad I couldn't wait. 'You're tearing me apart Lisa!'

Ha_ha_ha_ha_ha *makes sex* Ha_ha_ha_ha

Mr. Chipman certainly has a point. He's referring to an already worldwide phenomenon, focusing on its effect on the movie-goers. Each and every generation gets even more spoiled, they get straight to dessert without even having to look at the vegetables. This is basically the way to sell things nowadays. 5 awesome minutes out of 96 just don't cut it anymore. I, your average mindless consumer, have paid for this sh-t and am therefore entitled to extract every bit of amusement/entertainment out of it. Effortlessly. The entertainment has to be served on a platter. It's why the 'blockbuster' movies are but a concatenation of scenes with loud, blinking objects presented with ridiculously high cuts per minute rates. Anything else in between them (explaining the fast-moving, loud, blinking objects for example) would bore the audience if stretched longer than a few minutes. That's just how it is, anything that comes out is reduced to its' "best parts" in the eye of, and in case of the mentioned YouTube videos, BY the consumers.

I doubt "bad movies with great single scenes" will ever truly go away.

There will always be people who don't understand how to make a real GOOD movie, but REALLY want to make movies. They'll find a way to get funding, or make the movie with their own shit and throw it out onto the airwaves..

And these movies, may or may not, have truly awesome moments.

You may be able to get the highlights of these movies on Youtube, but the accidental nature of a lot of these favorite scenes make it so that they'll always crop up eventually.

The appeal of the grindhouse aesthetic with modern filmmakers is just a bit of history repeating. Look at the movie people in my and Bob's generation grew up with, Star Wars, Raiders of the Lost Ark, etc. These movies were not things unto themselves but the filmmaker paying homage to the movies (or movie serials in these cases) of their youth. After a hundred years of film, the medium is becoming self-referential. Filmmakers are paying homage to the movies they grew up with to which a later generation will pay homage. Now there's a scary thought.

As someone who enjoys bad movies as much as good ones, I'm a little disheartened by the youtube generation's circulation of clips. however, it is inevitable. We don't live in the Information Age. We live in the Convenience Age. Finding clips of the "best" parts of bad movies is just easier than slogging through terrible movies to find these parts, which is a time-consuming process. Why spend two hours watching a movie when all you want is the three minute clip?

Where this may have far-reaching industry effects is that most people will stop at watching the clip vs the entire feature. Why buy Star Crash on DVD when you can watch the good parts on Youtube? (Long live Marjoe Gortner!) An entire branch of the industry is in serious jeopardy if the bargain bin fodder is no longer profitable. And if one branch of the film industry no longer bears fruit, the entire tree may wither.

Perhaps that's a bit Chicken Little. At most it may mean a serious restructuring of the film industry to keep itself profitable. Some companies may go under while new ones, more savvy to the needs of the new market, will spring up and flourish. It's just good business. What it means for people like me, though, is adjusting to the sort of product this new market prefers and lamenting why they don't make the movies they used to.

swaki:
sure, you make some points along the way, but i just cant shake off the feeling that i just willingly listened to you whine about how something got mainstream and now you cant impress smelly women whit your knowledge of it anymore and also because now that people know about it, it sucks and sold out.

well shake it off and pay attention next time because you missed the big point. it's not about bragging rights, it's about the personal experience of cinema-seeking. That's what is disappearing with youtube, the journey and reward of finding these little bits of treasure. Whether that's a good or bad thing is subjective, I'm certainly not opposed to skipping the bad parts of a bad movie just to see an awesome lightsabre battle with a claymation robot. then again, there's no way of knowing what movies are bad and good without watching them for yourself (Zombie for instance is a kick-ass movie - the zombie-shark fight is just icing on the cake!)

Strange coincidence Bob, I just ran across Q in my local video store just a couple weeks ago, was wondering what the hell it was. Video Spectrum in Bowling Green OH is a cornucopia of these great old dreck-fests, with its massive VHS horror section.

it's not only youtube, all footage can be skipped through or missed completely.

Furburt:
I never watch things on youtube before seeing them. Except for The Room, and that was just so gloriously bad I couldn't wait. 'You're tearing me apart Lisa!'

D00D!!!

I freakin' LOVE that part!

/hi-five.

The Bandit:

swaki:
this just sounds like an annoying hipster/emo/indie saying how he/she/it discovered this great band/movie/cartoon/game which they only like ironically and how they where into to that (ironically or not) band/movie/cartoon/game before it got all popular.

sure, you make some points along the way, but i just cant shake off the feeling that i just willingly listened to you whine about how something got mainstream and now you cant impress smelly women whit your knowledge of it anymore and also because now that people know about it, it sucks and sold out.

This. If something is bad, I don't want to watch it. So, I'll settle for just the good parts. If I miss out on some of your nostalgia, oh well. It's not my problem. It's not your problem either, really. You just choose to cry about it.

To address the first quote, I didn't get that feeling at all. He actually said that he loves telling his friends about the films, as long as they watch the whole thing. Endure the crap. That's the whole point, his problem is with people only watching the brilliant scenes, rather than the whole movie.

And for the second, he isn't talking about nostalgia. He's talking about how watching the whole movie, enduring the bad parts too, makes you feel like you've earned the brilliant scene, thus making it even better.

At least, that's what I got from it. And I'm never wrong.
/sarcasm

A really BAD movie (so bad it's good) will have many such moments though.

Everyone knows "Kick ass and chew gum" and "The greatest fight scene ever" from They Live! but without sitting through the rest of the film you won't get why...

And really, even I fail with turkeys like Cannibal Women in the Avocado Jungle of Death.

"Bob Chipman" is dead.

Supposedly.

Well, I'm mostly just glad to see somebody else who liked Death Proof. As far as I know, the film was universally panned. Even most Tarantino fans seem to hate it.

Oh, and as long as we're mentioning awesome/horrible movie moments:

"They're eating her! And then they're gonna eat me!"

Maybe the Youtube effect will stop movimakers making movies with only 9 minutes of awesome, and make GOOD movies. You can't fit The Godfather into a Youtube clip (but i'm sure many have tried). I'm sure this effect also spoils the male audience for Chick flicks where the big A List celebrity has a 30 second nude scene whuch it TOTALLY justified in the context of the story.

Correction, the best part of Surf Nazis Must Die was the pubic hair in your eye insult.

The problem with all these awful old movies as opposed to awful movies now is that the awful movies I grew up on there was a feeling that they were releasing the movie knowing it was utter garbage and could revel in that fact. Now you get the impression someone puts out a remake of The Fog turned into a teen slasher movie and have the arrogance to think it might do well.

My question is this: how is the devolution any different from the ADD phenomenon in general in our culture these days? I don't think it's so much that You Tube killed Grindhouse, as our short attention span society put the knife in the hand of YouTube and then wrapped our hands around that, and proceeded to stab away.

Reading thsi article reminded me of Simpsons episode, Saturdays of Thunder, in which Homer goes to a movie rental store and sees this scene from this action movie, (called McBain, but only Simpsons fans would care about that) in which the bad guy tries to shoot the titular character, but ends up killing a man about a day away from retirement, who was just talking about his family and how he plans to spend more time with them after he retires. After being shot repeatedly, he tells McBain to do one thing: get back at the man who murdered him.

When asked if he wanted to rent the movie, Homer replied "Why should I? I just saw the best part!"

It kind of applies to what you where saying, somewhat, but I get what you mean.

This should have an "i like it" button.
Because i like it a lot.

I guess this why I am not really into nostalgia. It gives people a skewed vision of their past. It also sounds like you are pissed that you did the work and sloughed through horrible movie after horrible to see the gold, but you are just becoming aware that other people do not have your patience and cheated.

Well, I am one of those cheaters, but I did not use youtube. I used the original killer of movies to do it. That's right these compilations were on tv. The studios were making the same arguments you are now. There used to be best scene montages on television on all the networks and I watched all the scenes you mentioned without using the internet.

Now, I watched my share of bad movies: Toxic Avenger, Class of Nuke 'em High, Avocado women in the Amazon Jungle of Death, invisible maniac, girlfriend from hell, Meet the Applegates, Sweet Sugar, Hunk, just to name a few. I have seen everything Troma has made.

Fact of the matter is that people are going to cheat and not do the work regardless of the new medium. Quit sounding like a grandpa.

Custard_Angel:
Agreed... I watched some of Pulp Fiction on it and it kind of blew everything up for me...

When I saw the actual movie I already knew how awesome Samuel Jackson was and how great the movie was I didn't have to make up my mind on anything...

I've since resolved to never looking at anything I haven't already seen.

nevermind that popular culture has adapted/stole all the catchphrases in a movie and use them daily as if it was something awesome.

 

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