The Pocket Gamer Report: Is Cloud Gaming the Future for Handhelds?

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mmm i dont have a ps3 but playing ps3 games on my psp sound dope!

Kudos for not mentioning OnLive.

I am very excited by the thought of cloud-gaming, or cloud-computing as a whole. But, being the somewhat pirate I am, I would loose tons of benefits.

If the monthly fees would be fitting, and the practical issues sorted, I would definitely use cloud-gaming.

It sounds awesome

Wow, a system where you have no ownership over your games!

This, concept is stupid.

I've been doing a lot of research on cloud based architecture in mobile devices for a University assignment. It was more focused on business applications than games, but it's still relevant. The troubles I have found is that without some very powerful techno-sorcery the mobile networks in place today are woefully inadequate for mobile use. It is a problem that could be sorted by moving more load on the client end, and thus reducing data transfer, but then we run into the problem that we are trying to fix.

Such a method is perfectly reasonable for home use with current technology, but will you be able to play games on the go with nothing more than a device with a screen and an aerial? Not without Major investment in wireless internet over the entire country. It is something that may be feasible in the future, but not now.

I think its going to be much more important in the portable market than it will be in the home if they ever work out the kinks, the data required is much smaller and the computation is far less than say on-live streaming Crysis to your house. The problem comes with infrastructure and as projects of gaming aplications of cloud computing (on-live etc) have shown is the problem is that even in the home the reliability of connection is still a major issue and an almost terminal one when you leave the home.

I personally have a host of massive problems with the whole idea of cloud application to products, requiring vast data centres and potentially compromises the rights of the end user.

Though as awesome it would be for me to be able to play the Mass Effect, it would probably not happen as Microsoft and Sony and Nintendo are quite uptight about their exclusive rights. But, inner corporation thingamajigs like PSP to PS3 and such is a good idea

My problem with cloud gaming is a similar problem I have with many DRM systems. What happens down the road when particular titles are no longer financially worth hosting. Say I really like a certain game, and I play it all the time, but recently few people have been playing it. Now the cloud company doesn't feel that it is financially feasible to keep the game up and running so they discontinue it. Now I no longer can play the game I love playing because there is no physical copy of it.

Think of how many good games will be lost to time because there will no longer be any physical copies to buy.

While it does sound viable, I feel there are a few problems with cloud gaming that can render it nothing more than vapor:

1. Persistent Internet Connection: This, I feel, is the biggest problem for me, especially when it comes to handhelds. If you're constantly on the move, and you suddenly hit a dead zone--poof, your progress in the game vanishes. And then you need to wait to leave the dead zone to start playing again, which could take a while.

But surely this isn't a problem at home? Actually, yes, yes it is, especially if you have an Internet service that caps your usage rate after so much data has passed through the tubes. What happens if you hit the limit in the middle of a gaming session? Poof, slower Internet, rendering your game unplayable. And if it happens in the middle of the month, you're out of luck--have fun trying to figure out what happens to Nathan Drake!

Not to mention issues with the servers themselves. If you're very far away from the closest server, be prepared for a very slow game. Or if too many people try to access the same server at once--be prepared to be booted, routed to a server 100 miles away from the first, a really slow game, or just a flat-out server crash. This will also happen in the middle of the final boss fight, when you have him down to 10% health.

2. Ownership: So, who exactly owns the games? Not you--you have no copy to call your own, either as a disc or as data files on your computer. Your cloud company will own your games, and just lease them to you like an eternal Blockbuster. At least with DD services like Steam, you more or less own the games, and can opt to play them without connecting to the Internet, but the way cloud based gaming works justs seems like a rental. Not to mention what happens if the company suddenly goes under or a hacker completely destroys their server. No more Metal Gear Solid movie for you!

Erm...I thought I had more than this. but whatever.

This isn't a point I'm going to add up there, but why is cross-platform gaming viable to you?
If you want to play handheld games at home, why not just play the handheld? Why must a game that only works on the DS also work on the PSP? Why do you want to play Virtual Console games, like Ocarina of Time, or console titles on a handheld (which has a screen that's only slightly larger than a paper playing card) when it'll most likely result in, to quote Yahtzee, "teeny-weeny-eyestrain-o-vision?" This isn't an attack, I'm actually curious as to why someone would want this function.

Nazrel:
Wow, a system where you have no ownership over your games!

This, concept is stupid.

Seriously...defeats the purpose all together

Cloud is the future of everything. Too bad you need an uber powerful connection or live basically on top of the servers, but it's eventually going to be on computers, phones, handhelds, etc. It just makes too much sense. You don't need every Google server to use Google search, why should you need the server and the physical media to run games?

Heart of Darkness:

2. Ownership: So, who exactly owns the games? Not you--you have no copy to call your own, either as a disc or as data files on your computer. Your cloud company will own your games, At least with DD services like Steam, you more or less own the games,

Heh you should really start reading the fine-print dude.

ark123:

Heart of Darkness:

2. Ownership: So, who exactly owns the games? Not you--you have no copy to call your own, either as a disc or as data files on your computer. Your cloud company will own your games,

Heh you should really start reading the fine-print dude.

Explique Ud. por favor. But in English if you don't mind.

Jaredin:

Nazrel:
Wow, a system where you have no ownership over your games!

This, concept is stupid.

Seriously...defeats the purpose all together

Really? I'm assuming you re-sell your games regularly, then, because 99% of mine are piled up somewhere in my room under a box or something. If you don't re-sell them, why would you not prefer to pay a certain fee to play them as much as you want, basically forever?
The purpose is to have fun. I don't give a rat's ass if I can't re-sell my copy of Borderlands, I paid 30 bucks to the company that made it and I think that it's perfectly fair that another person pays that if they want the same experience. You don't get to re-sell your TV shows or movies you see in the theater, and games should be the same.

Heart of Darkness:

ark123:

Heart of Darkness:

2. Ownership: So, who exactly owns the games? Not you--you have no copy to call your own, either as a disc or as data files on your computer. Your cloud company will own your games, and just lease them to you like an eternal Blockbuster.

Heh you should really start reading the fine-print dude.

Explique Ud. por favor. But in English if you don't mind.

I'm sorry, did I slip into latin or something unintelligible?
Try to sell anything you have on Steam and check how much "ownership" you have over that product. Hell, sell your account and tell them about it, see what happens.

ark123:

Heart of Darkness:

ark123:

Heart of Darkness:

2. Ownership: So, who exactly owns the games? Not you--you have no copy to call your own, either as a disc or as data files on your computer. Your cloud company will own your games,

Heh you should really start reading the fine-print dude.

Explique Ud. por favor. But in English if you don't mind.

I'm sorry, did I slip into latin or something unintelligible?
Try to sell anything you have on Steam and check how much "ownership" you have over that product. Hell, sell your account and tell them about it, see what happens.

It's Spanish. Foreign languages are your friend.

That's not the point I was trying to make. I meant it along the lines of: if the Steam servers suddenly went down or Valve was going out of business, I would have the option of downloading my games as .exe files, with the necessary data files, in order to play them outside of Steam.

That's ownership, non?

Heart of Darkness:

ark123:

Heart of Darkness:

ark123:

Heart of Darkness:

2. Ownership: So, who exactly owns the games? Not you--you have no copy to call your own, either as a disc or as data files on your computer. Your cloud company will own your games,

Heh you should really start reading the fine-print dude.

Explique Ud. por favor. But in English if you don't mind.

I'm sorry, did I slip into latin or something unintelligible?
Try to sell anything you have on Steam and check how much "ownership" you have over that product. Hell, sell your account and tell them about it, see what happens.

It's Spanish. Foreign languages are your friend.

That's not the point I was trying to make. I meant it along the lines of: if the Steam servers suddenly went down or Valve was going out of business, I would have the option of downloading my games as .exe files, with the necessary data files, in order to play them outside of Steam.

That's ownership, non?

No, not really. Ownership implies you can sell what you own. You own the right to play Steam games, but there's a LOT of restrictions that apply to that. I'm not exactly certain on what all of them are, but I do know you can just get your game taken away if you try to hack Team Fortress 2. I *think* the same can happen if you decide to be a dick repeatedly to the same person, but I'm not certain. See, that's more like a lease than ownership. By the way I'm Brazilian. That means the same in portuguese too. I speak russian, italian, french and I can handle myself in yiddish. I'm great friends with foreign languages =D

ark123:

Heart of Darkness:

ark123:

Heart of Darkness:

ark123:

Heart of Darkness:

2. Ownership: So, who exactly owns the games? Not you--you have no copy to call your own, either as a disc or as data files on your computer. Your cloud company will own your games,

Heh you should really start reading the fine-print dude.

Explique Ud. por favor. But in English if you don't mind.

I'm sorry, did I slip into latin or something unintelligible?
Try to sell anything you have on Steam and check how much "ownership" you have over that product. Hell, sell your account and tell them about it, see what happens.

It's Spanish. Foreign languages are your friend.

That's not the point I was trying to make. I meant it along the lines of: if the Steam servers suddenly went down or Valve was going out of business, I would have the option of downloading my games as .exe files, with the necessary data files, in order to play them outside of Steam.

That's ownership, non?

No, not really. Ownership implies you can sell what you own. You own the right to play Steam games, but there's a LOT of restrictions that apply to that. I'm not exactly certain on what all of them are, but I do know you can just get your game taken away if you try to hack Team Fortress 2. I *think* the same can happen if you decide to be a dick repeatedly to the same person, but I'm not certain. See, that's more like a lease than ownership. By the way I'm Brazilian. That means the same in portuguese too. I speak russian, italian, french and I can handle myself in yiddish too. I'm great friends with foreign languages =D

So that's what your comment referred to. You need to be more clear.

And no, you can't get your game taken away. You just lose the access to play on the VAC protected servers in TF2. You still have access to the game, and can still play in achievement servers and the ilk, but to have your game taken away? That's called stealing, and it's illegal.

Ownership doesn't necessarily mean that you can resell things. I own this hamburger, for instance, but that doesn't mean I can resell it to someone else once I'm done with it. I go into buying this hamburger knowing that it's for my consumption only, and the same is true of digitally distributed games.

And, just to mess with what I just said, I technically CAN sell my Steam account. Whether Valve doesn't like it or not is none of my business, and is now the other guy's problem.

Heart of Darkness:

So that's what your comment referred to. You need to be more clear.

And no, you can't get your game taken away. You just lose the access to play on the VAC protected servers in TF2. You still have access to the game, and can still play in achievement servers and the ilk, but to have your game taken away? That's called stealing, and it's illegal.

Ownership doesn't necessarily mean that you can resell things. I own this hamburger, for instance, but that doesn't mean I can resell it to someone else once I'm done with it. I go into buying this hamburger knowing that it's for my consumption only, and the same is true of digitally distributed games.

And, just to mess with what I just said, I technically CAN sell my Steam account. Whether Valve doesn't like it or not is none of my business, and is now the other guy's problem.

http://store.steampowered.com/subscriber_agreement/
End of the first part. You can't sell your steam account. Your hamburger argument is ludicrous for many and obvious reasons, so I won't even address it.

We pay for the right to use the content, you don't actually buy *the game* per se when you get it with Steam (which is why it's not stealing if they take your right to play it away). What you can or cannot do with it is explained in great detail in the link above. Go to Item 9 and read up on Limitation on Liability where they basically state that your "Valve dies, I get my software" argument is also just false.

Oh, and you can get sued if you do try and sell your account. It says so in the end. So it is your problem.

ark123:

Jaredin:

Nazrel:
Wow, a system where you have no ownership over your games!

This, concept is stupid.

Seriously...defeats the purpose all together

Really? I'm assuming you re-sell your games regularly, then, because 99% of mine are piled up somewhere in my room under a box or something. If you don't re-sell them, why would you not prefer to pay a certain fee to play them as much as you want, basically forever?
The purpose is to have fun. I don't give a rat's ass if I can't re-sell my copy of Borderlands, I paid 30 bucks to the company that made it and I think that it's perfectly fair that another person pays that if they want the same experience. You don't get to re-sell your TV shows or movies you see in the theater, and games should be the same.

I never sell games. I play them. I collect them. Sometimes I do lend them.

Your statement of "Basically forever" is intrinsically flawed. They're not going to keep the games up forever. In fact the company's continued existence is in no way guaranteed. If Working Designs had been doing that, I wouldn't be able to play Growlancers, Lunar ,or any of their other games now. Hell I can't play Animatmundi properly anymore cause Hirameki went under.
(there was a important patch.)

If they're severs go down? Sucks to be you. High traffic? Sucks to be you. Going through a dead zone? Sucks to be you. You are entirely beholden to a third party to be able to play a game at anytime, ever!

As for your "Movie/TV" argument, I have a stack of DVD's that says otherwise.
(Not pirated, Legitimately purchased.)

I am not paying for an experience. I'm paying for a repeatable experience, dependent on factors I have some control over.

ark123:

Heart of Darkness:

So that's what your comment referred to. You need to be more clear.

And no, you can't get your game taken away. You just lose the access to play on the VAC protected servers in TF2. You still have access to the game, and can still play in achievement servers and the ilk, but to have your game taken away? That's called stealing, and it's illegal.

Ownership doesn't necessarily mean that you can resell things. I own this hamburger, for instance, but that doesn't mean I can resell it to someone else once I'm done with it. I go into buying this hamburger knowing that it's for my consumption only, and the same is true of digitally distributed games.

And, just to mess with what I just said, I technically CAN sell my Steam account. Whether Valve doesn't like it or not is none of my business, and is now the other guy's problem.

http://store.steampowered.com/subscriber_agreement/
End of the first part. You can't sell your steam account. Your hamburger argument is ludicrous for many and obvious reasons, so I won't even address it.

We pay for the right to use the content, you don't actually buy *the game* per se when you get it with Steam (which is why it's not stealing if they take your right to play it away). What you can or cannot do with it is explained in great detail in the link above. Go to Item 9 and read up on Limitation on Liability where they basically state that your "Valve dies, I get my software" argument is also just false.

Yes, but I can still sell it. The option is there. The argument here is not whether doing so will result in penalization, but whether if it can be sold to thus determine ownership. It can be resold, hence I do own the games.

Heart of Darkness:

ark123:

Heart of Darkness:

So that's what your comment referred to. You need to be more clear.

And no, you can't get your game taken away. You just lose the access to play on the VAC protected servers in TF2. You still have access to the game, and can still play in achievement servers and the ilk, but to have your game taken away? That's called stealing, and it's illegal.

Ownership doesn't necessarily mean that you can resell things. I own this hamburger, for instance, but that doesn't mean I can resell it to someone else once I'm done with it. I go into buying this hamburger knowing that it's for my consumption only, and the same is true of digitally distributed games.

And, just to mess with what I just said, I technically CAN sell my Steam account. Whether Valve doesn't like it or not is none of my business, and is now the other guy's problem.

http://store.steampowered.com/subscriber_agreement/
End of the first part. You can't sell your steam account. Your hamburger argument is ludicrous for many and obvious reasons, so I won't even address it.

We pay for the right to use the content, you don't actually buy *the game* per se when you get it with Steam (which is why it's not stealing if they take your right to play it away). What you can or cannot do with it is explained in great detail in the link above. Go to Item 9 and read up on Limitation on Liability where they basically state that your "Valve dies, I get my software" argument is also just false.

Yes, but I can still sell it. The option is there. The argument here is not whether doing so will result in penalization, but whether if it can be sold to thus determine ownership. It can be resold, hence I do own the games.

Well you can still steal the servers where the cloud games are stored and sell them too, but we're discussing legal options. Hell, you could just go around selling all sorts of things that don't belong to you. Start putting "for sale" signs on random houses with your number, break into a car and then sell it. According to you, once you're in those things you own them, no matter the penalty when you try to sell them.

A smart man would have stopped after I posted that link and said "Oh damn, I never read through that, I had no idea I didn't actually own Steam games. My bad" and avoided looking like a lunatic though.

Heart of Darkness:

ark123:

Heart of Darkness:

So that's what your comment referred to. You need to be more clear.

And no, you can't get your game taken away. You just lose the access to play on the VAC protected servers in TF2. You still have access to the game, and can still play in achievement servers and the ilk, but to have your game taken away? That's called stealing, and it's illegal.

Ownership doesn't necessarily mean that you can resell things. I own this hamburger, for instance, but that doesn't mean I can resell it to someone else once I'm done with it. I go into buying this hamburger knowing that it's for my consumption only, and the same is true of digitally distributed games.

And, just to mess with what I just said, I technically CAN sell my Steam account. Whether Valve doesn't like it or not is none of my business, and is now the other guy's problem.

http://store.steampowered.com/subscriber_agreement/
End of the first part. You can't sell your steam account. Your hamburger argument is ludicrous for many and obvious reasons, so I won't even address it.

We pay for the right to use the content, you don't actually buy *the game* per se when you get it with Steam (which is why it's not stealing if they take your right to play it away). What you can or cannot do with it is explained in great detail in the link above. Go to Item 9 and read up on Limitation on Liability where they basically state that your "Valve dies, I get my software" argument is also just false.

Yes, but I can still sell it. The option is there. The argument here is not whether doing so will result in penalization, but whether if it can be sold to thus determine ownership. It can be resold, hence I do own the games.

Your original arguments were relatively decent, if a tad ill-informed about the actual ownership rights of steam i.e

D. Ownership.

All title, ownership rights and intellectual property rights in and to the Steam Software and any and all copies thereof are owned by Valve and/or its licensors. All rights reserved, except as expressly stated herein. The Steam Software is protected by the copyright laws of the United States, international copyright treaties and conventions and other laws. The Steam Software contains certain licensed materials and Valve's licensors may protect their rights in the event of any violation of this Agreement.

But this one is kinda ridicules.
Steam and Cloud, both transitory and emathereal concepts.
Steam is just slightly less the @$$ rape.

Nazrel:

ark123:

Jaredin:

Nazrel:
Wow, a system where you have no ownership over your games!

This, concept is stupid.

Seriously...defeats the purpose all together

Really? I'm assuming you re-sell your games regularly, then, because 99% of mine are piled up somewhere in my room under a box or something. If you don't re-sell them, why would you not prefer to pay a certain fee to play them as much as you want, basically forever?
The purpose is to have fun. I don't give a rat's ass if I can't re-sell my copy of Borderlands, I paid 30 bucks to the company that made it and I think that it's perfectly fair that another person pays that if they want the same experience. You don't get to re-sell your TV shows or movies you see in the theater, and games should be the same.

I never sell games. I play them. I collect them. Sometimes I do lend them.

Your statement of "Basically forever" is intrinsically flawed. They're not going to keep the games up forever. In fact the company's continued existence is in no way guaranteed. If Working Designs had been doing that, I wouldn't be able to play Growlancers, Lunar ,or any of their other games now. Hell I can't play Animatmundi properly anymore cause Hirameki went under.
(there was a important patch.)

If they're severs go down? Sucks to be you. High traffic? Sucks to be you. Going through a dead zone? Sucks to be you. You are entirely beholden to a third party to be able to play a game at anytime, ever!

As for your "Movie/TV" argument, I have a stack of DVD's that says otherwise.
(Not pirated, Legitimately purchased.)

I am not paying for an experience. I'm paying for a repeatable experience, dependent on factors I have some control over.

All valid points, the cloud is something that'll only make sense in the future, where people have multiple servers all around the world so if one goes down the other supports the stream, and connections are so fast that lag is not a factor.
DvDs- Most people already use hulu, netflix etc. Physical media is on it's way out.
It might not be forever, but one thing is for sure. I've a bunch of games on Steam and I have a bunch of DVDs. Many of the DVDs are scratched or the second was lost, etc. You have a much better chance of not losing your game if it's up on Steam. What's more, because they're actually selling a very "shitty" product (you basically trade ownership for convenience), they rely on keeping their costumers happy (hence, servers that almost never lose information or go down unexpectedly) . If I had to bet, I'd say you're never going to see Valve discontinue support of a game, even if the company goes under. That's how I got to play Titan Quest.
In the case of Steam, you're very much paying for a repeatable experience. I've installed, gotten bored of, and reinstalled Fallout 3 two times. Then my machine died. I got another, got into my account, and in about six hours I had all my games back on my HD. No pile of plastic anywhere, no fussing about trying to find serial numbers, everything in one place, where it can't be lost or destroyed. That's worth my money.

ark123:
Well you can still steal the servers where the cloud games are stored and sell them too, but we're discussing legal options. Hell, you could just go around selling all sorts of things that don't belong to you. Start putting "for sale" signs on random houses with your number, break into a car and then sell it. According to you, once you're in those things you own them, no matter the penalty when you try to sell them.

A smart man would have stopped after I posted that link and said "Oh damn, I never read through that, I had no idea I didn't actually own Steam games. My bad" and avoided looking like a lunatic though.

The only problem with your counter argument is that you didn't spend money on those.

And who says it's illegal? As far as I know, it only breaks the EULA/ToS. This does not make it illegal. Show me the law that selling my account breaks, and I will gladly concede defeat.

Nazrel:
Your original arguments were relatively decent, if a tad ill-informed about the actual ownership rights of steam i.e

D. Ownership.

All title, ownership rights and intellectual property rights in and to the Steam Software and any and all copies thereof are owned by Valve and/or its licensors. All rights reserved, except as expressly stated herein. The Steam Software is protected by the copyright laws of the United States, international copyright treaties and conventions and other laws. The Steam Software contains certain licensed materials and Valve's licensors may protect their rights in the event of any violation of this Agreement.

But this one is kinda ridicules.
Steam and Cloud, both transitory and emathereal concepts.
Steam is just slightly less the @$$ rape.

Here's the kicker though. This is true of games, movies, any form of media, even in physical form. No-one really owns games, only licenses to play them. So a floppy disc containing King's Quest VI is a license to play the game, but the game is owned by Sierra. Same with Dragon Age: Origins. Even though I own the physical DVD, it's still just a license. Hence, talking about ownership of games results in the owning of licenses. Talking about the differences between owning games and licenses, at least on the consumer level, is practically a moot point.

(And yes, I am well aware that I am losing this argument.)

Yes, you are :D

But I admire your perseverance in face of solid evidence.

ark123:
...everything in one place, where it can't be lost or destroyed.

Well, yeah, until they decide to take the server down or any of the other stuff everyone else mentioned.

Heart of Darkness:

No-one really owns games, only licenses to play them...Even though I own the physical DVD, it's still just a license.

You know, I never really thought about it that way. It makes a lot more sense that I can't legally copy and redistribute a DVD that I payed for when you bring the whole "license" aspect into consideration.

I guess the bottom line is that, either way, paying for a game isn't a guarantee that you'll get to play it forever, but if you have an actual hard copy and don't need to get any further permission each time you decide to fire it up, your right to play can't be revoked arbitrarily.

Edit: Now that I think about it, a hardcopy isn't just a license to play. You do physically own a copy of the intellectual property and it is implied that you can use it at your leisure without the fear of it being taken away from you. Adding that extra layer of "you did pay money for this, but you can only use it provided that you don't piss us off" is kind of like selling someone a book and then taking it back because they called your little brother a "fag" one too many times. I mean, yeah, they never actually owned the IP in the book itself, but they did own that copy...

The idea of a "cloud" for electronics extends far beyond video games. The original idea (if I'm not mistaken) was to use it for all computers, which would eliminate malevolent hackers (there would be no data stored on normal computers so to get anything of use they would have to hack the cloud, which would be near-impossible) and allow you to access your data and programs on any computer by inputting a password. Pretty awesome stuff.

ark123:
Yes, you are :D

But I admire your perseverance in face of solid evidence.

Thanks. I seek to better myself through the acquisition of knowledge. If I must lose a few arguments to do so, then so be it. =D

Asimov:
The idea of a "cloud" for electronics extends far beyond video games. The original idea (if I'm not mistaken) was to use it for all computers, which would eliminate malevolent hackers (there would be no data stored on normal computers so to get anything of use they would have to hack the cloud, which would be near-impossible) and allow you to access your data and programs on any computer by inputting a password. Pretty awesome stuff.

"Near-impossible" isn't nearly "impossible" enough, especially considering that gaining access to the cloud would put you in position to pwn everybody's data.

The major problem with clouds specifically for gaming is latency. Server produces a frame of graphics, let's say it goes straight into a compression algorithm and over the wire to your device. 1/10 to 1/4 of a second later your hardware gets it and uncompresses it and pushes it to the screen. Since you're already late, you'd better mash those buttons fast! That same fraction of a second elapses before the server knows what you've done. The net result is that your input is lagging behind where you are in the game by anywhere from 1/4 to 1/2 a second. Good luck playing any action-oriented title like that.

It would be nice if Sony implemented some save-game portability between PSP and PS3 versions of a game, and extended the "license" you purchase on PSN to include installs for all formats of a game title especially considering that they must absolutely lose the sale of a redundant game version. Buying the HD or Portable version of a PSN game guarantees that I won't spend equal money on the other one.

commasplice:

ark123:
...everything in one place, where it can't be lost or destroyed.

Well, yeah, until they decide to take the server down or any of the other stuff everyone else mentioned.

Again, the chances of that happening with a company line Valve are practically nil. It's much more likely that your brother will steal your DVD or you'll leave it out in the sun and the plastic will melt, or that it simply will stop working (yes, DVDs have a shelf live).
It would be a complete PR disaster if Valve started pulling games from people randomly, which would lead to people not buying games through Steam, which would lead to Steam dying. Don't be paranoid. "The Man" isn't after your games.

ark123:
Again, the chances of that happening with a company line Valve are practically nil. It's much more likely that your brother will steal your DVD or you'll leave it out in the sun and the plastic will melt, or that it simply will stop working (yes, DVDs have a shelf live).
It would be a complete PR disaster if Valve started pulling games from people randomly, which would lead to people not buying games through Steam, which would lead to Steam dying. Don't be paranoid. "The Man" isn't after your games.

http://www.escapistmagazine.com/news/view/97200-EA-Shutting-Down-Older-Game-Servers-in-February
I'm sorry, you were saying? Yeah, those may just be the servers for online multiplayer, but the point remains the same: the companies have no incentive to pay money to upkeep servers that aren't making that money back. So yeah, even assuming that Valve never goes belly-up, that doesn't guarantee that they'll be willing to pay to run every single server that checks to make sure you're running a legit copies of their games for the rest of eternity.

commasplice:

ark123:
Again, the chances of that happening with a company line Valve are practically nil. It's much more likely that your brother will steal your DVD or you'll leave it out in the sun and the plastic will melt, or that it simply will stop working (yes, DVDs have a shelf live).
It would be a complete PR disaster if Valve started pulling games from people randomly, which would lead to people not buying games through Steam, which would lead to Steam dying. Don't be paranoid. "The Man" isn't after your games.

http://www.escapistmagazine.com/news/view/97200-EA-Shutting-Down-Older-Game-Servers-in-February
I'm sorry, you were saying? Yeah, those may just be the servers for online multiplayer, but the point remains the same: the companies have no incentive to pay money to upkeep servers that aren't making that money back. So yeah, even assuming that Valve never goes belly-up, that doesn't guarantee that they'll be willing to pay to run every single server that checks to make sure you're running a legit copies of their games for the rest of eternity.

Yes, EA shutting down online servers is the exact same as Valve shutting down Steam. And they have no financial incentive to upkeep Steam's online servers.
Look, I'm not going to just come out and say it, but have you ever taken an IQ test?

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