Going Gold: Why You Need to Buy Heavy Rain

 Pages PREV 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 NEXT
 

Rocketboy13:

Here is my central position, if you are a parent you should spend more time with your kids rather than play this game, and if you are not a parent then you won't be able to fully empathize with the situation to begin with and the hoped for narrative impact won't happen. It is a failure of concept.

That's just silly. So if I'm a parent I should knock off gaming? The extrapolation here is that a parent should do nothing that doesn't directly or indirectly take care of their kid. Should these parents knock off reading books too? I mean, they could be spending their time with their kid!

The flip side, I'm not a parent. You're absolutely right. I won't be able to FULLY empathize with the situation. That doesn't mean I won't be able to empathize somewhat with the situation (have I had loved ones that I've worried about in the past? Check).

Is a movie about a father looking for his daughter a failure of concept if the parents 'should spend more time with their kids and less time watching movies' and non-parents 'won't be able to FULLY empathize'?

Irridium:
You know, when he says he wants more games like Heavy Rain, he means more story based games

Wait up. Mass Effect 2, which is a hugely story based game, just had the best January launch in history, as I understand it. I was part of it. (Wished it had kept more of the terrorist-captured RPG elements, but hey.) Now, I get the larger point you're making, which is that Heavy Rain has a less fantastical story, and that its success may judge the market for less fantastical material.

But the flipside to it is that purchasing it also endorses its mechanics. And even the positive reviews agree that Heavy Rain employs an abundance of Quick Time Events and heavily relies upon filmic techniques. And I'm deadset opposed to those. I don't want to endorse that approach to game development.

What's a guy supposed to do? As I said in my first post in this thread, I have no easy way to make my message heard.

I would buy Heavy Rain but I don't require a second copy.

I'm doing my part.

If I had money and a console then I would definitely pick it up but alas I am ridiculously broke at the moment so I cannot afford to buy a game instead of food.

BlindChance:

Irridium:
You know, when he says he wants more games like Heavy Rain, he means more story based games

Wait up. Mass Effect 2, which is a hugely story based game, just had the best January launch in history, as I understand it. I was part of it. (Wished it had kept more of the terrorist-captured RPG elements, but hey.) Now, I get the larger point you're making, which is that Heavy Rain has a less fantastical story, and that its success may judge the market for less fantastical material.

But the flipside to it is that purchasing it also endorses its mechanics. And even the positive reviews agree that Heavy Rain employs an abundance of Quick Time Events and heavily relies upon filmic techniques. And I'm deadset opposed to those. I don't want to endorse that approach to game development.

What's a guy supposed to do? As I said in my first post in this thread, I have no easy way to make my message heard.

Yes, Mass Effect 2 was a big story based game with a great launch. But Bioware is known for this. And most publishers/developers that tried making a heavily story based game have usually failed, save for Bethesda.

What I'm trying to say is that if it does well, it will show that gamers want more mature stories.

And those types of games are just suffocating the market.

I think I understand where your coming from. You don't want to support this type of game, where the gameplay is basically reliant on QTE's. If I'm wrong, correct me.

This is the first game I have ever played where I actually experienced any type of emotion. Its the first game where I've actually shed a tear when someone died. The first game where I actually regretted my actions, the first game where I actually thought about and considered the concequences before I did something.

In a game like Mass Effect, you generally start with a ciertan playthrough in mind, you will either be good or evil. Perhaps something in-between. And those choices are usually conveniently spelled out right before you on the little conversation wheel.

That is not the case with Heavy Rain. Most choices you may think are good may actually be bad, and vice versa. There isn't much "good" and "evil" in this game, and aren't many "good" or "evil" choices/concequences.

Publishers aren't looking at the details. What their looking for is "will a story-based game sell well."

If it does, we may see more focus on story modes in games instead of a half-assed, generic story that only serves as a tutorial for the multiplayer portion.
The gameplay will most likely be left up to the developers (high hopes here).

We won't see devs completely abandon great gameplay and multiplayer, since games like Battlefield, MW2, Halo, and many other show that there still is a huge market for those games. If Heavy Rain shows there's also a market for story based games, they will also develope for those people.

Yes, Heavy Rain isn't the best example of what we want, but its all we have, and its the only way to show them we want more maturity in games. It won't work to wait for something better, since if this fails, we won't see anything at all.

AAAAAARRRRRGH! I hate it when console exclusives get more praise than other games (from reviewers)! Has anyone noticed that a lot of games that get mostly critical praise (such as Fable 2 and Halo 3) are received with more of a "meh" to the common person?

Me, i think Heavy Rain had potential, but videogames have a LOOOONG way to go to reach the cinematic beauty of film (Videogames can't reach the level of Citizen Kane or other great, classic films in terms of storytelling and pacing, but they CAN reach that stage in their own terms. Games should focus on being games, not on trying to be movies.)

EDIT: So you know, I don't hate heavy rain, i just don't want to support this game because I just didn't enjoy it, I DO actually want more trolls and zombies to kill, the story could be just okay and generic enough to help the game keep its structure but have AMAZING gameplay (like L4D or Dead Rising, which I think had a pretty generic story) and that's what I want to see more of, Better Gameplay, not necessarily better story

Sounds familiar to, let's say, minority political issues. Person X is part of minority Y. Person X is a horrible person, and does awful things. Minority Y bands together to defend person X, because the lines between persecution and prosecution can be very blurry. Years later, not-quite-minority Y admits that person X was evil, and they knew this then as well, but they couldn't stand to let the downfall of person X tarnish their then struggling minority rights. (Keeping in mind all along that a persecuting majority might very well use Person X as justification for continued persecution of the entire minority. Exceptions. Rules. Whatnot.)

The whole thing, including this article and my minority analogy, makes me feel icky. Heavy Rain should be rewarded if it does things new and well, not if it fails in an attempt to do new things. As members of a minority, we will obviously be tempted to band together and protect our fellow member, but it is disingenuous and potentially dangerous (if the game succeeds, and the industry says "Hey, they really like games that are bad in the following ways" instead of recognizing that we supported a game because of the good things it tried to do and failed at, or marketing/accounting types start to rely on the minority to buy anything suitably marketed to our minority demographic).

Azaraxzealot:
AAAAAARRRRRGH! I hate it when console exclusives get more praise than other games (from reviewers)! Has anyone noticed that a lot of games that get mostly critical praise (such as Fable 2 and Halo 3) are received with more of a "meh" to the common person?

Me, i think Heavy Rain had potential, but videogames have a LOOOONG way to go to reach the cinematic beauty of film (Videogames can't reach the level of Citizen Kane or other great, classic films in terms of storytelling and pacing, but they CAN reach that stage in their own terms. Games should focus on being games, not on trying to be movies.)

I disagree. Heavy Rain combined the best qualities of both industries and mixed them together brilliantly.

The writer of this article definitely didn't get the point. Yes, there is a lot of gameplay. Yes, the narrative is excellent and the story as a whole is absolutely fucking brilliant. Finish the game, you'll be shocked when you learn the identity of the Origami Killer.

Yes, there is a lot of interaction. The player really drives the story forward in their own way, this isn't a game that creates the illusion of choice and effect. This is a game that is about choice and effect.

In short? Buy it. I'm not going to say this again. Just do it and let yourself be immersed in this incredible experience. You will not regret it.

Irridium:
I think I understand where your coming from. You don't want to support this type of game, where the gameplay is basically reliant on QTE's. If I'm wrong, correct me.

Half right. The QTEs are more a symptom than the actual problem, to me. My main problem with it is David Cage's relentless attempt to derive a more cinematic -- filmic is a better word -- presentation to gaming; which is what turned me off Farenheit and made him my mortal enemy (kidding). I'm somewhat more sympathetic to it in games like Uncharted (which I also haven't played, since I don't have a PS3 yet) since at least they're using tried and tested gameplay ideas to get there, but I still see them as essentially a flawed concept.

Clint Hocking remains my hero for putting it neatly and succinctly,

Clint Hocking:
...I am conceptually opposed to going too far down this path of using narrative techniques - not because we can't make our games much more emotionally engaging than they are currently - but because we already know the limits of this approach. By mastering these narrative techniques and wedding them to our designs (as we did with the Buddy System in Far Cry 2 - but better) we can arrive at Saving Private Ryan. What that means is that 10 or 20 or 50 years from now, we will deliver a brand new entertainment medium that is as powerful and moving as one we already have. That's great, I guess. But if I am going to dedicated my life this, I want to end up with something that is more, something that is better than what we have now.

In the end, the old saw about diff'rant strokes applies. Nothing is saying we can't have both Heavy Rain and Shadow of the Colossus.

But I admit it, I can't see the point of the Heavy Rain path, for exactly the reasons stated above, and for another one: It distances the player for me. I didn't cry at Shadow of the Colossus, but I sure as hell felt like throwing up, because I killed those things. It wasn't Wander, or some guy on screen. I did it. I used the mechanics to directly apply myself to killing those beautiful giants.

That's worthwhile. It's where I think the true promise is. And as such, well, yeah. I get a bit annoyed with the attention David Cage gets. I think he's imitating film, not carving out new horizons. Clint Hocking and Fumito Ueda deserve the attention more.

BlindChance:

Half right. The QTEs are more a symptom than the actual problem, to me. My main problem with it is David Cage's relentless attempt to derive a more cinematic presentation to gaming; which is what turned me off Farenheit and made him my mortal enemy (kidding). I'm somewhat more sympathetic to it in games like Uncharted (which I also haven't played, since I don't have a PS3 yet) since at least they're using tried and tested gameplay ideas to get there, but I still see them as essentially a flawed concept.

Clint Hocking remains my hero for putting it neatly and succinctly,

Clint Hocking:
...I am conceptually opposed to going too far down this path of using narrative techniques - not because we can't make our games much more emotionally engaging than they are currently - but because we already know the limits of this approach. By mastering these narrative techniques and wedding them to our designs (as we did with the Buddy System in Far Cry 2 - but better) we can arrive at Saving Private Ryan. What that means is that 10 or 20 or 50 years from now, we will deliver a brand new entertainment medium that is as powerful and moving as one we already have. That's great, I guess. But if I am going to dedicated my life this, I want to end up with something that is more, something that is better than what we have now.

In the end, the old saw about diff'rant strokes applies. Nothing is saying we can't have both Heavy Rain and Shadow of the Colossus.

But I admit it, I can't see the point of the Heavy Rain path, for exactly the reasons stated above, and for another one: It distances the player for me. I didn't cry at Shadow of the Colossus, but I sure as hell felt like throwing up, because I killed those things. It wasn't Wander, or some guy on screen. I did it. I used the mechanics to directly apply myself to killing those beautiful giants.

That's worthwhile. It's where I think the true promise is. And as such, well, yeah. I get a bit annoyed with the attention David Cage gets. I think he's imitating film, not carving out new horizons. Clint Hocking and Fumito Ueda deserve the attention more.

Yeah, its true. I don't much like David Cage either. But I do like what he's trying to do. And I agree that Clint and Fumito need more attention. Shadow of the Colossus is one of my favorite games.

Games need to stop being like movies, because their not and will never be. I just wish more Publishers and devs would understand that...

It just sickens me that most people call games "mature." Because their not, all they are are explosion filled tits 'n' blood fests with lots of swears thrown in. There are very few actually mature games out. I just want more of them, and sadly Heavy Rain is the only game right now that can send that message to people.

I would get it because I belive in having different experiences with games. But, then again, I don't have a PS3.

Irridium:
It just sickens me that most people call games "mature." Because their not, all they are are explosion filled tits 'n' blood fests with lots of swears thrown in. There are very few actually mature games out. I just want more of them, and sadly Heavy Rain is the only game right now that can send that message to people.

Maybe we should just play the game, and if it's good, do our best to get more people to play it over time. And, with any luck, get sustained sales over the year that combined end up being very impressive.

THEN we could send three messages: One, that good games about less traditional game fare will do well, two: That the industry emphasis on opening month numbers is irrational, and three: That if you're going to make games aimed at older audiences with kids, responsibilities and budgets, you may need to accept the sales will be over a longer time period, too.

I think that last point is one that really needs to be made more often, actually.

BlindChance:

Irridium:
It just sickens me that most people call games "mature." Because their not, all they are are explosion filled tits 'n' blood fests with lots of swears thrown in. There are very few actually mature games out. I just want more of them, and sadly Heavy Rain is the only game right now that can send that message to people.

Maybe we should just play the game, and if it's good, do our best to get more people to play it over time. And, with any luck, get sustained sales over the year that combined end up being very impressive.

THEN we could send three messages: One, that good games about less traditional game fare will do well, two: That the industry emphasis on opening month numbers is irrational, and three: That if you're going to make games aimed at older audiences with kids, responsibilities and budgets, you may need to accept the sales will be over a longer time period, too.

I think that last point is one that really needs to be made more often, actually.

Yeah, I agree. But its easier said than done, since virtually every developer and publisher thinks the complete opposite :(

It would be easier to do if there weren't any damn exclusive games, then pretty much anyone could get them, and not a limited market.

Irridium:
It would be easier to do if there weren't any damn exclusive games, then pretty much anyone could get them, and not a limited market.

Yeah. I understand why Heavy Rain is an exclusive title, Sony's funding it. But it's a darn shame.

The worse thing is this: The more niche a title, the less likely the publisher will be willing to spend more money coding it up for multiple franchises.

Thus, a mass market extrrrrrravangza like Modern Warfare 2 will be dominated by the kinds of fans who might very well be picking and choosing which of their platforms they want to buy it on, but a game like Heavy Rain that will perhaps appeal more to people on budgets is going to limit itself to one platform, which might not be the platform its market may be able to use.

I certainly appreciate how Heavy Rain attempts to be different, however if there is one things that it's important to remember about video games, it's that they are not movies.

If you create dramatic scenes that the audience fails to feel then the audience may feel that they are missing the point of large chunks of the game.

Considering that this game is a PS3 exclusive, exactly how indicative of gamers' opinions in general can it be? Perhaps if it were for PC, the audience might be slightly wider.

In any case, I find mature to be a rather subjective word, frequently mistaken for "violent", "bloody", "long-winded" or "tiresome".

Pioneering games that play like movies doesn't directly help those of us who prefer to create our own characters with their own motivations (yes, I prefer sandbox gameplay). No script writer can make their own characters appeal to as many people as characters that are simply extensions of the player in such a way.

Heavy Rain is a PS3 exclusive, therefore I will not buy it, as that would require purchase of a PS3.

hURR dURR dERP:
Let's hope Omikron 2 will be available on PC!

They're making an Omikron 2?! I will be super pissed if that turns out to be another console exclusive.

BlindChance:

Irridium:
It would be easier to do if there weren't any damn exclusive games, then pretty much anyone could get them, and not a limited market.

Yeah. I understand why Heavy Rain is an exclusive title, Sony's funding it. But it's a darn shame.

The worse thing is this: The more niche a title, the less likely the publisher will be willing to spend more money coding it up for multiple franchises.

Thus, a mass market extrrrrrravangza like Modern Warfare 2 will be dominated by the kinds of fans who might very well be picking and choosing which of their platforms they want to buy it on, but a game like Heavy Rain that will perhaps appeal more to people on budgets is going to limit itself to one platform, which might not be the platform its market may be able to use.

True, plus it could draw unjust criticism from the people who can't play it. It happens with exclusives all the time. With one side claiming its the best game ever and the other saying its nothing more than a "glorified cutscene" of whatever, like MGS4. Something tells me if MGS4 came out on the 360 as well, there would have been a lot less haters...

When i played the demo, i said to myself: "hmm that looked O.K." and thinking if i had to buy it, i definitly wouldn't because it wouldn't last long.

my main concern about games nowadays is that They Must Be Looooonnnnng !

I really want to play Heavy Rain, but I have invested heavily into a powerful gaming pc and I don't have any of the consoles of this generation. I think that in a few years when I can get the consoles and games cheap I will have to go for it.

It never ceases to amaze me how people on one end can say "buy this game becuase..." and people on the other end can retort by saying "don't buy this game becuase..." WHen the underlining reason for both arguments is prety much the same thing.

If you bought the game and you didnt like it becuase of the style of game play; then you're a fool, and I'd be willing to bet you have a fairly large game collection (or your local gamestop loves to see you or your parents coming for that 10 dollar trade in) full of other trashy games you've bought becuase the commerical or game trailers looked 'cool'. Don't hate the game, hate the player.(...) Learn what your spending your money on before you mindlessly spend it and then complain about what you bought.

Gaming taking steps towards new ways to tell a story that may or may not be directly driven by the player is just one of the roads that devs are taking these days. I for one think the game is rather intresting and the controls, while they can be very annoying at times, add a diffrent element to the game play. Is it the best system ever? Hell no. It could use alot of work (walking controls in particular) but unless your lacking hand eye coordination you get used to the game very quickly.
The direction this game takes makes me happy to think that there are Devs out there thinking out side the box and not just coping last years "big" hit, repackaging, and selling us the same old Dribble that we see every 6-8 months. Its a step in a direction that means there are people still out there testing the limits and looking at different ways to push the envelope. Sure there will be epic failures and games like Hard Rain may crash and burn or be considered a commerical failure; but the fact is that some other dev team may look at the ashes and figure out a better way to make the 'genre' fly and eventually improve on it to a point where the game is fun for all players.

As for the whole "mature" rating thing. I personally think game companys are scared of even getting near that rating. Its alot like the movie industry. They know PG-13 will get the teeny boppers in the seats while the R-rating will cut down on sales. While some companys want to push the limits they are too afraid over what the fall out might be. Worst yet, most games get more negitive press over a little bit of nudity or foul language then story. So most "mature" ratings are boil down to nothing more then a bit of "T'n'A" rather then a mature story line. Judging from what I have seen of Hard Rain so far I think that it falls into that catagory too as well. While tho story is dramatic and places alot of emotional 'stress' on the player; I'd be willing to bet the rating comes more from the Nudity then the gore or story.

"Mature" gaming will always fall under the same problems movies have. NO matter how great or good a game could be made with a MA rating. Most companys will 'dumb it down' to get that lower rating so they can market it to the kiddies.

It's just to bad they don't do "directors Cuts" for games.

gee ... no i won't buy this game , as for the mature aspect of the game all i can say is meh ... been there , played it , moved on

knowing how the game industry is it will probably be over hyped and win ps3 goty and then the game will end up in the discount bin at walmart with 50 copies of the same game ... yes this is the sad part of the game industry ... next game please

Just got it from gamefly today, and I know I'm going to buy this now. I'm only about an hour into the game now, I decided to take a break and see what other people thought of it. But let me say this, this game has made me come pretty close to crying already, and that's pretty hard. I'm not just blowing smoke here, I'm not one of those people who have claimed to cry at Aeris's death in FF7. But this game does make you feel legitimate emotions, which a game has failed to do for me until now. Its a masterpiece in its own right, well ok I won't go as far to call it a masterpiece before finishing it, but I have a feeling when I finish it I will still call it a masterpiece.

For all of you who are on the fence about this game, rent it first, it really is something you either love or hate, but at least give it a chance.

1(FN)Vendetta:
If you bought the game and you didnt like it becuase of the style of game play; then you're a fool, and I'd be willing to bet you have a fairly large game collection (or your local gamestop loves to see you or your parents coming for that 10 dollar trade in) full of other trashy games you've bought becuase the commerical or game trailers looked 'cool'.

How much are you willing to bet?

the1ultimate:

Pioneering games that play like movies doesn't directly help those of us who prefer to create our own characters with their own motivations (yes, I prefer sandbox gameplay). No script writer can make their own characters appeal to as many people as characters that are simply extensions of the player in such a way.

I agree, and that's one of the things that I love about sandbox games: I find myself creating my own story and motivations - reasons I have Tenpenny Tower guarded by Garden Gnomes.

The thing is I don't need to see "real emotional drama" in my games; it's hard to watch Hollywood labor with it for a couple of hours.

And while I can understand that some people do, I still think the whole QTE thing is just lazy at this point. I tried the demo and they don't even seem like they tried to make the QTEs intuitive. Still, I haven't taken it off my rental list and I hope the controls aren't as awkward as they seemed in the demo.

I just think someone has to tell these guys that the game industry has evolved beyond the point where they can still reinvent Dragons Lair.

Andronicus:
I've been looking forward to this game for a long time, so I doubt I can be dissuaded to buy in any case, but I am a little disappointed to hear the vioce-acting is sub-par and it suffers from so many glitches. I'm wholeheartedly looking forward to Yahtzee's point of view though, can't wait for his review!

EDIT:

Jumplion:
fads n' stuff

Wow, just had to say that sounds like a great name for a band!

Ha, true dat.
Don't worry about the glitches though, I've heard the exact opposite with only very quick framerate hitches on occasion. The glitches the OP mentions could just be clipping into the wall for a second.

though I wouldn't know as I haven't played it, though I'm still going to play it regardless.

jimduckie:
gee ... no i won't buy this game , as for the mature aspect of the game all i can say is meh ... been there , played it , moved on

knowing how the game industry is it will probably be over hyped and win ps3 goty and then the game will end up in the discount bin at walmart with 50 copies of the same game ... yes this is the sad part of the game industry ... next game please

What other games had mature themes like child abuse/death, rape, murder, torcher, loss of loved ones, and deception?

BlindChance:

Jumplion:
You're looking into this way too deeply, no one genre will ever completely take over production and it's silly to assume that somehow Cage is trying to impose everything on gaming.

I think my sentence was misconstrued. (And partially, yes, I admit to hyperbole. Mea culpa.) I meant more that he's destroying the game element of his own productions, replacing them with weak film.

That said, the very point that Christian Ward was making in his column was that by buying Heavy Rain, we're sending a message to publishers that we want games like Heavy Rain. I'm not saying that Cage's games will become all that's every published, but I sure don't want to send a message saying I want to see more games like it.

Hehe, mea culpa, that makes me giggle seeing as how I'm listening to this. Frollo's my favorite villan.

Though back on topic, as Geoffry42 said;

Geoffrey42:
(if the game succeeds, and the industry says "Hey, they really like games that are bad in the following ways" instead of recognizing that we supported a game because of the good things it tried to do and failed at, or marketing/accounting types start to rely on the minority to buy anything suitably marketed to our minority demographic).

I don't really know if I'm referring to you or not, I tend to go all over the place, but it shouldn't be put down on what it doesn't do, but it should be put up for what it does do. While Heavy Rain would probably make for a weak movie, the fact that it's a game sets a completely different standard. Much more interactivity is given and much more detail has to be made. It's not the fact that it would make a weak movie, but that it would make a great game (experience). I don't care what Cage says, Heavy Rain is a game through and through. It may not be a traditional one, but damnit it's a game.

i slowly starting to regret getting BF:BC2 now hmmmmmm

My two cents:

This first point is gonna go off on a bit of a tangent, but it's the primary reason that I'm not buying Heavy Rain, so it'll all tie in in the end. I don't have a PS3 and I can't afford to buy one presently. If I could have afforded to buy a PS3 I would likely have purchased at least a dozen games for it by now. It baffles me why console makers are willing to give up any software sales so they can make money on their hardware sales - the former clearly outweighs the latter.

Secondly: yes, video games are stuck in comic book land. Yes, video games have the potential to be substantially more involving than the most engaging novel ever written. No, they're not gonna get there for a few more decades at least. Heavy Rain is going to flop. It's going to flop because it's a bad game. It's a bad game trying out something new that would make a good game truly exceptional, but it doesn't have the power to make a bad game good. I think it's truly unfortunate (and perhaps even asinine) that this first venture was constructed so poorly (even doomed to fail) which will backtrack any and all progress it made towards its noble goal (and probably even more).

In the end, I wouldn't buy a comic book just because it was trying to tell a deeper, more involving story if some of its pages were stuck together and I'm not gonna buy a game that I won't enjoy just for the same reason. I will wait, patiently, until the inevitable happens and someone manages to make a good game in the style. Then, I will gleefully watch as its sales soar through the roof and publishers sit dumbstruck wondering why they hadn't tried it before.

As an aside: In response to Farenheit/Indigo Prophecy (which I did play) I noted something to the following effect: Games do need creators who are willing to take risks, and try to be mature. But they also need critics willing to call out games which are merely pretentious rather than truthfully mature.

I haven't played Heavy Rain at this point, so I can't do that yet.

But Joaby, at Game Arena has. And look at this paragraph:

Joaby:
People will try to argue that Heavy Rain is important for video games - that it matures the form of entertainment by providing a story above the level we're used to from developers. Trying and failing might be better than never trying at all - but that still doesn't make it anything other than a failure. When the game ends and the implausible happens - the fairy tale ending occurs - you will fully understand that Heavy Rain is child's play fiction, not a mature interactive film noir. Heavy Rain is important for video games - but only because it highlights how immature they can be as a medium.

I have no idea if Joaby is right or not. But I salute the intent: Call a spade a spade. That is a far better attitude than insisting upon rewarding ANY attempt to be mature, regardless of its success.

Irridium:
What other games had mature themes like child abuse/death, rape, murder, torcher, loss of loved ones, and deception?

This post isn't a literal attempt to answer your question, by the way. It's more a "consider this" deal.

But Mass Effect 2 gets almost all of them.

Child abuse? Check. Rape? Touches on it. Murder? All over the place. Torture? You bet. Loss of loved ones? Extensive subplot on it. Deception? One of the major characters is an embodiment of the theme.

People sometimes shortchange how much content and theme you can get out of standard designs.

I was absolutely sure to get Heavy Rain, but this article, instead of strengthening that notion, made me reconsider. You just keep going on about the awful problems the game has, and now you literally instruct me to buy it? WTF has happened to common sense? If you want someone to buy something, you don't start to cite what's wrong with it, or not without bringing equally good points. Meh...

It seems Heavy Rain suffers from some of the very same problems Fahrenheit did. Awful dialog and voice acting, unusual controls and a slightly off story. However, Fahrenheit is still my most favorite action/adventure game to date, because of it's storytelling and immersion factor. I guess I just hold off buying it until I get to try it out at some friend's place.

BlindChance:

Irridium:
What other games had mature themes like child abuse/death, rape, murder, torcher, loss of loved ones, and deception?

This post isn't a literal attempt to answer your question, by the way. It's more a "consider this" deal.

But Mass Effect 2 gets almost all of them.

Child abuse? Check. Rape? Touches on it. Murder? All over the place. Torture? You bet. Loss of loved ones? Extensive subplot on it. Deception? One of the major characters is an embodiment of the theme.

People sometimes shortchange how much content and theme you can get out of standard designs.

Yes, but Mass Effect 2 is set in the future and in space. Not to mention your around those types of people a lot so it tends to not matter as much. Especially murder since you kill something on pretty much every planet.

All that stuff in Heavy Rain actually takes it seriously, where you don't play as people like that. You play as people who never experienced any of it, people who are (relatively) good people and don't deserve to be exposed to any of it. And since you play them for a while, and get to know them, it hits you harder.

ME2 had lots of choices, but most of the time it was either "kill" or "not kill." Other times it didn't really matter as much what you chose, since the result is usually the same (mostly results in a fight).

The game's creator, David Cage, says as much. "It's about asking the market, are you interested in experiences that are for a mature audience based on storytelling and triggering more complex emotions?" Cage told Eurogamer. "If the game doesn't sell, it's going to close doors to everybody and for a long time... Do you want [games] to be just trolls and goblins and zombies? Then don't buy it."

As much as I'm enjoying Heavy Rain so far, I can't really take this quote seriously. In fact, I see it as kind of pathetic. "If you don't buy our game, you're ruining the industry for everyone."

Get over yourself, David Cage; stop trying to guilt-trip people into buying your game.

BlindChance:

Irridium:
What other games had mature themes like child abuse/death, rape, murder, torcher, loss of loved ones, and deception?

This post isn't a literal attempt to answer your question, by the way. It's more a "consider this" deal.

But Mass Effect 2 gets almost all of them.

Child abuse? Check. Rape? Touches on it. Murder? All over the place. Torture? You bet. Loss of loved ones? Extensive subplot on it. Deception? One of the major characters is an embodiment of the theme.

People sometimes shortchange how much content and theme you can get out of standard designs.

AAARRRRGGHHH! THIS!

Out of all the talk of Heavy Rain, it's the constant insistence of "maturity" that gets me. It's no more mature than any other game out there, and offers no content not covered (and in some cases covered better) by other games; they just slap that label on the cover in the hopes that the pretentious douchebag crowd will overlook the fact they're playing a Quick Time Event: The Movie: The Game.

 Pages PREV 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 NEXT

Reply to Thread

Log in or Register to Comment
Have an account? Login below:
With Facebook:Login With Facebook
or
Username:  
Password:  
  
Not registered? To sign up for an account with The Escapist:
Register With Facebook
Register With Facebook
or
Register for a free account here