Going Gold: Why You Need to Buy Heavy Rain

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I want to say something about all this mature stuff.
The trick is in "video game" title of the computer entertainment.
Game = fun
That's why we have that holy war today.
Books and movies, as an entertainment, dont have to be fun. It can depressing, serious, sad etc. Avatar, for example, is a great movie, it's fun to watch all this action. But Titanic is a great movie too, in spite of it will make you cry.
Considering video gaming today the problem is that we think that game MUST be fun, or it's just a pile of dogshit.
I want more mature themes (serious ones, not rata-ta-tat, phew-phew-phew, oceans of blood and gore), because we are lacking games that will provoke not only an amusement, but others feelings too, and due to interaction, gaming have unique advantage over movies, books or music: we can make decisions on our own, and that provide new fringes of emotional reaction to the art, like responsibility. That what Bioware talking about all the time - high emotional response to the gaming.
Sadly too see, but game industry dont want to grow up. I know, it's all about money, and mindless Mario shit sells better, because it's great video game, fun to play blah-blah-blah.
I'm SO tired of being amused. I want philosophic game, i want scary games, i want sad games, i want games that will put me in the depression, i want feel a different experience.
And this is what Heavy Rain gives to me, despite this ugly QTE shit. I care about characters and story, and i'm thinking now about how far i can go on my own to save my family. ME2 and DA:O are much better in the gameplay and story, but HR trying to be realistic and it's easier to personify yourself with the simple persons, like HR characters.
I hope, all the thing, that Bioware, Quantic Dreams, and other developers do, wont be waste of time, and someday "video gaming" become "video art". And there will be not only funny and amusing games, but serious ones too.

Uhm, hope my English good enough to understand :D

Flimsii:
my thoughts are why pay 40 for a b-movie?

This is exactly why I am waiting for the price to drop before I pick up a used copy of this one [assuming I still want to after having rented it]. I tried the demo and it seems a better experiment than Mirror's Edge was but, I am not salivating over this game. It's different sure and, apparently if a character dies the story continues with no game-over so that will be interesting to test out but, I am not the about to jump people in parking lots for this one.

Christian Ward:
Going Gold: Why You Need to Buy Heavy Rain

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1. But if you care about the future of storytelling in this industry, if you have an interest in seeing games graduate from their comic-book hell and deal with real adult themes for real adults, then you need to put your money where your mouth is and purchase this game, new, in the first month of release. Even if you hate it - and that's entirely your prerogative - consider it your donation to the future of this industry.

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2. For a game that is technically on the bleeding edge, Heavy Rain occasionally feels like something of a throwback. At its heart, it's not a lot more than a very pretty "visual novel" (albeit in the same way Modern Warfare 2 is a very pretty Wolfenstein 3D). More than that, it feels like the type of game you might imagine seeing ten years ago on the Dreamcast, full of genre defiance and non-standard control schemes.

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3. The voice acting ranges from poor to competent depending on the character, but none ever reach "excellent." The America of Heavy Rain is one located firmly in Uncanny Valley, California - a 1980s Hollywood as seen through the eyes of a Frenchman. I get the impression that Cage is not a dialogue virtuoso even in his native language, but even so, some of the lines are real duds, even if the overall quality of writing is far superior to Indigo Prophecy.

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4. Is it a game that I will be playing every day for 30 minutes for the next six months? Absolutely not. But is that what videogames have to be? Heavy Rain won't be for everyone, and that's fine. I dream of a games industry where we can accept that what you don't like isn't automatically awful - where we can have different tastes and recognize that this is not a bad thing.

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5.True, Heavy Rain alone cannot save them. But if it flops, it would be sending a message to publishers the world over - a message that says gamers don't want story, gamers don't want mature themes. Instead, let's see what else we can pin existing mechanics onto instead. Has anyone tried God of War in space yet?

Is this the industry you want? The choice is up to you. Gamers are very good at saying "no" - no paid DLC, no DRM, no sequels that come out too close to the original game. This is one of those times where you can say "yes." Cage can be infuriatingly pretentious at times, both in his interviews and in his heavy-handed approach to game design. But at least he wants to take us somewhere new. In this case, the destination is more important than the journey.

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1. The following comic books would like to have a word with you: Sandman, Fables in Exile, Criminal, Fell, The Walking Dead, DMZ, Transmetropolitan, Preacher and Y: The last man.

2. I can read a novel for $7.99 paperback or 19.99 Hardcover or for free with my library card. I can render it in my imagination far more competently than even the best graphics engine ever could. This argument does not sway me towards purchase of a $59.99 game. I'm especially unpersuaded by it's pedigree of Indigo Prophecy, a game that started out fair to middling and took a writing nose dive about midway through. We already have epic and entertaining stories coming out of Bioware that sell remarkably well, to seemingly no effect on the rest of the industry. To be fair, I doubt the writing in Heavy Rain is as formulaic as say Mass Effect or Dragon Age, but there is a lot to be said for competent voice actors in story driven games.

3. I've written better notes than Indigo Prophecy (and yes, I am one of the about 4 people who played it to completion). Saying the writing to HR is better IP is not a ringing endorsement, particularly when we're being asked to shell out $60 for an interactive movie/novel. Judging from the Demo of Heavy Rain (which crashed my system at the end of the crime scene section to a painfully loud static and black screen) I would say that between the dialogue and the poor voice acting, it was more reminiscent of The Room than Uncanny Valley, though still a step up from that at least.

4. Very true, a game doesn't have to be awful just for not appealing to my tastes. However, spending $60 on a game that isn't at all to my tastes would be pretty awful, given the state of the economy and the necessity to save. I'd hate to blow my entertainment budget on a game that is groundbreaking and fresh and utterly painful for me to play.

5. I'm glad someone else has noticed this, that most of the big sellers are existing mechanic schemes that are getting stale and tiresome. Personally, I'd like to see gaming move in a different direction too. But Heavy Rain is not that direction either. Going somewhere new sounds all well and good, until you get off the plane and realize you've been dropped someplace you'd have never chosen to go had you known where it was you were heading.

Sorry, but I'd say this is a rental at best.

ITT thread, people make some really good and valid counterpoints such as:
1. Cage is pretentious and headed off in an equally wrong direction.
2. Voice acting is important in story driven games.
3. We do buy meaningful, emotional games (shadow of the Colossus, Ico) when available.
4. It is insulting to say that if we care about the state of gaming we must buy this game.
5. Games should be fun to play too. No reason it can't be deep or meaningful and still not be fun.

jthm:
5. Games should be fun to play too. No reason it can't be deep or meaningful and still not be fun.

I disagree that games have to be "fun" specifically, they're not just limited to "whee!"... a game could set up any sort of emotional payoff. It's certainly acceptable for them to be terrifying, horror is a and popular game genre. What about a punk-themed game that parodies and exaggerates the crappy parts of real life to inspire a pissed-off rage at the state of society and leave the player wanting to do better for themself IRL?

kingcom:

silversun101:

kingcom:
Can anyone explain to me how jason dies? Seriously i dont understand how he died and you come out of it completely fine.

Actually the dad was in a coma for 6 months and now suffers from blackouts. You learn this info when he's at his therapy session.

Ah ok, never got that far on my friends playstation though wouldnt that meant he would have crippleling back problems and unlikely to walk again? It looked like the father was between the kid and the car...am I going crazy?

*shrugs* This takes place 2 years later. I'm guessing physical therapy?

jthm:

5. Games should be fun to play too. No reason it can't be deep or meaningful and still not be fun.

I think this is the problem with us still using an antiquated term like 'video game'. It does a disservice to the possibilities of the medium. Sure, most of these games are rightfully called games. They're tied to mechanics designed to be fun. That doesn't mean every game needs to be this way.

I can enjoy or appreciate a work of art without 'having fun' with it. Case in point: Funny Games. The movie is intentionally made to make you squirm. It's made to make you not really enjoy all of the stuff that makes slasher films enjoyable to folks. It's definitely not a 'fun' movie. Doesn't mean it's not a bad movie.

Having loved Fahrenheit, and having spent my entire Thursday(yesterday)playing through Heavy rain, I can honestly(based on hands on experience)say that I want more games like this. The beginning was slow, I understand why, but I ultimately ended up caring about the decisions in the game. I think I probably got the best possible ending first time around because I invested so much in it and wanted that happy ending, I'm going to go through again and puposely botch things or do them differently...just to see what happens.

I love it, it is different to other games...which I really needed to vivify my interest in games.

Like a lot of people here, I've got to agree that saying the war in the game industry is between games like Halo and Heavy Rain is presenting a false dichotomy. An evocative story and engaging gameplay don't have to be mutually exclusive; in fact, in a good game, the two compliment each other.

All I ask is that you consider where you want this industry to go. Heavy Rain asks how far you are willing to go to save somebody you love.

Guess what? Shadow of the Colossus asked the same question, and it did it with fantastic gameplay and something like three lines of dialogue.

I bought it today, but won't have a chance to play it until Sunday :(

The thing is though, as I find myself growing older, maturing and having a lot more things to worry about in life than gaming, I'm getting less and less time to sit down and play games, and paired with the current economy, having to have less and less money to pool specifically for games. Heavy Rain is , just as Fahrenheit was before it, something different, and I welcome that in a time where I continuously find myself getting bored with games that I have because they feel all too "same-y" to me.

These days I consider it a personal milestone having my PS3 on for more than 2 hours at a time, and having a load of games that are all very similar in nature to each other isn't helping push the boat out any further.

jthm:
ITT thread, people make some really good and valid counterpoints such as:
1. Cage is pretentious and headed off in an equally wrong direction.
2. Voice acting is important in story driven games.
3. We do buy meaningful, emotional games (shadow of the Colossus, Ico) when available.
4. It is insulting to say that if we care about the state of gaming we must buy this game.
5. Games should be fun to play too. No reason it can't be deep or meaningful and still not be fun.

1. We have comics (right between movies and books), games like Zork (between games and books), theater (books and movies) etc. Well interactive fiction genre (between movies and games)is ok, but what Cage says is insulting: "Buy our game or industry won't grow up". Oh come on man, you are not the center of the universe! I understand his artistic feelings for his own product, but just do a good game and people will buy it, no need in this pathetic words.
2. Yep
3. We dont have much choice of this kind of games today. It's just few AAA projects,a pair of surprises from the new and not famous developers, and some indy games in the year.
4. From the developer - yes, from the critic - no, it's just his opinion.
5. Fun is a wrong word. Gameplay should fit the story. In survival horrors, for example, gameplay isn't fun, but still enjoyable: you always don't have enough ammo and healt, you are scared of the monsters all the time.

i hate it soo bad , its is not a game its one big interactive boring film with quicktime events and yes i haave played the game for more than an hour

this is not the direction the games industry should go at all.

silversun101:

kingcom:

silversun101:

kingcom:
Can anyone explain to me how jason dies? Seriously i dont understand how he died and you come out of it completely fine.

Actually the dad was in a coma for 6 months and now suffers from blackouts. You learn this info when he's at his therapy session.

Ah ok, never got that far on my friends playstation though wouldnt that meant he would have crippleling back problems and unlikely to walk again? It looked like the father was between the kid and the car...am I going crazy?

*shrugs* This takes place 2 years later. I'm guessing physical therapy?

Oh how much gameplay they wasted. You could have QTE your way through getting back into functioning order, ill assume im reading too much into it but a game trying to push emotional boundaries having this gaping hole of unexplained....hopefully it was explained a little better elsewhere?

If buying low quality games for innovation is necessary to change the industry then I won't. Buying a game because it is different and only has one redeeming qualitie says that half-assed games will sell as long as they're innovative.

I enjoy a good yarn as much as the next guy, but the game boils down to an extended QTE with "Pick your Path" moments, and I am NOT okay with that. Heavy Rain is a 'skip' in my books.

I would absolutely love to have an evotlution of video games from mindless nothing to adult themes with depth and narrative but jduging by the obvious Indigo Prophecy indpired BS that is coming with Cage's next work, i lose hope. It's like the Darkness game. I actually have a vast interest in the comics and getting a movie out of it because of the game but the gameplay of the game sucked so bad that I refuse to play it anymore.

What? I should buy a PS3 game when I only have an Xbox...? Whaaaaat...?

Just kidding. But, while this game may have an impressive story that is interactive, I still fail to see what differentiates it from, say, a flash game on the Internet that lets you choose certain paths or actions and thus wildly changes the story... besides the obvious quality that Heavy Rain has in story and graphics.

I haven't played it, though, so it may surprise me.

Axolotl:
But the description as a deep, mature, freeform story reminds me of Planescape Torment so I have to ask anybody who's played both, is that a good comparison? And if so is HR anywhere near that standard?

I can answer that question,as I played through and trough and LOVED Planescape: Torment .

I'll give the answer now, and you can read the explanation below, if you're not scared of reading walls of texts (I cannot really post anything other, when I'm talking about things I like):

Yes, it is a GREAT comparison. I'll tell you more! HR it's not NEAR the standard of Planescape: Torment. At least for me - it tops it.

And now long explanation:

P: T was the first game, when I really felt the real, deep, human emotions from pixels on the screen. I remember myself sitting and watching the single dialog screen for 10 minutes (!!!) before choosing one of the three options to make the situation my way without hurting the feelings of the other person (I'm talking about Anna's confession of love to you). Yeah, I was afraid to hurt the feelings of NPC programed by some game makers. There were a lot of similar situations.

After that, no other game ever managed to do the same thing (Closest was probably SH II. KotOR II was close as well with probably the best designed NPC team in game ever [save for G0-T0], but cut content thanks to Lucas Arts ruined it. Also, I never played Shadow of the Collosus. It's really hard to get in Poland, but if I will, I'll definitely play it). And then came the Heavy Rain.

You know what? QD somehow managed to do it. And on an even bigger scale than P: T.

First of all, don't be afraid of those QTE's, really. At first they may be annoying, but after a while they just blend in the game, and fit it extremely well to the point, making them is almost as exciting and thrilling as a really good pacing shooter at the biggest climax point. No, really.

But where was I? Ah, emotions. I think, it will be the best idea to actually show you an example:

Out of the main cast, I used to sympathize and like the most Norman Jayden - FBI profiler. True dat, his voice acting was probably one of the weakest in the game, but it didn't hurt my ears, so I didn't really bother me. Why I felt so attached to them? Lot's of reasons. General attitude + behavior I chose for him during the game (also his actions), made him to me as a real person with his own problems, morals, beliefs etc. I really respected. If I would met someone like him in the real life - I would look forward to become friend with him. I liked the other characters as well, and I felt a connection with them (ok, I admit - Madison is a bit bland, she could use some more personal backstory, etc. but she's fine as well), but I was really happy whenever another scene with Norman appeared.

During one of those, another combat scene engaged. QTE's were appearing and appearing, but there was no annoyance in making them - no, it was rather 'Fuck, I HAVE TO make this. I'm not going to let him die. NEVER!'

And you know what? After all desperate and really frantic struggle... I failed. Norman died during that scene. And it was really REALLY horrible death.

Gotta say, even if Jayden's voice actor underperformed to that moment - that scream he made pierced my skull, and didn't leave my head even during the morning of the next day, and now haunts me whenever I think about it (yes, even now *shivers*).

You know, what was my reaction after seeing this scene? First was shock and awe of course. I felt like a billion of ice cubes fell on my chest. And when usually you would just see game over screen and try not to mess up next time, the game went to the loading screen for a scene with another character. Then I started crying, and... Apologizing. I started apologizing to fictional character, because due to my not good enough reflex, he died. Horribly. I turned off the console for the rest of the day because of emotions. The first thing I did on the next day? I lowered down the difficulty level, because with Jayden's death fresh in mind, I didn't know how I'll react if something similarly horrible would happen to anyone else.

But it's a good thing, you know? I love when the game makes me feel something more than simple pleasure because of winning, or entertaining gameplay. Even though it was a very sad emotion, after it faded out after a while, I felt extremely relaxed and calm (until I started playing the game again of course). Thanks to this game I managed to throw away all those emotions I don't want to fell in real life. And that is beautiful.

I played P: T in 2000. Finally after 10 years later, I found another game which could provide me such a great experience. I finished the game twice at the moment, and I'm going to finish it as much times, as it will be necessary to see everything this game has to offer (and still has a lot).

SimuLord:

I don't give a flying crap about arty-farty shit in my games. I want to kill people and break things. Goblins, trolls, and zombies are FUN. Mature adult themes for mature adults are not, especially when thanks to the Uncanny Valley your game creeps me the fuck out.

I snippeed the rest, but left this in for emphasis. This is why I play games - not to make dinner for some kid or guide a woman round her apartment, taking a shower and relieving herself. If in some parallel universe I own a PS3 instead of a 360, I would probably still have slapped down the 60 (or thereabouts) for Bioshock 2. That way, I can have my fun electrocuting freaks and then wacking them in the face with the business end of a drill.

I've always thought of games as a kind of escapism. Besides, if I want to see some heavy rain right now, I just need to look out my window....

If you want to see a video game that handles mature themes with gameplay that is actual gameplay, not just QTEs, please see Silent Hill 2. That being said... I am going to buy Heavy Rain, but not because I want the industry to see a message. I am interested in the story, just like I'd buy a movie with an intriguing plot summary on the jacket. Then I'll see if the gameplay distracts from, supports or merely doesn't get in the way of this story. I liked Indigo Prophecy, too, so...
On another point, writing a persuasive article where you try to convince a population to let their money do the talking apparently only works in politics. Sorry buddy, when it's entertainment, it's harder to make this seem like a dire, industry-changing decision. I think the industry already knows that badly-written or badly-buggy or badly-conceptualized or badly-designed or badly-executed gameplay will keep a game from being excellent. We're just going to have to deal with - as we always have - the inevitable failures that crop up when a studio doesn't perfectly execute a game. Heavy Rain fails on its own if it fails - the future of well-written games does not.

BEASTMAN SP:
I enjoy a good yarn as much as the next guy, but the game boils down to an extended QTE with "Pick your Path" moments, and I am NOT okay with that. Heavy Rain is a 'skip' in my books.

You know what? I'm no longer referring to them as "Quick Time Events" in reference to Heavy Rain. It's like saying MW2 sucks because its a first person shooter and Rogue Warrior is also a first person shooter and that game was utter tripe so any game that uses the FPS play mechanic must also be tripe. This is the logic being presented here, and Heavy Rain's mechanics have about as much in common with other examples of QTE as MW2 has with Rogue Warrior.

You know what this game is? This is a "Butterfly Effect" game. It isn't a simple "choose your path". There isn't the right choice and the wrong choice. Something you may or may not do, some trivial little thing like, um, deciding to take the trash out before leaving the house. Lets just use that as a random example off the top of my head. THAT little thing could come around hours later to greatly effect the outcome of certain events. And because you took out the trash, you were two minutes late and missed this opportunity, and because of that you didn't learn a vital clue that would allow you to do this, and ect, ect. But if you DIDN'T take the trash out, an entirely different set of events might unfold. Or maybe you picked up the slack and got to that clue, or discovered another clue that was even better.

What I'm trying to say is, Heavy Rain is not a QTE game. And anyone who tries to judge Heavy Rain before sitting down to play it has based their decision on very flawed logic. Now, if you play it and still don't much like it, well thats your prerogative.

agent ninja gaiden

Tis basically an video version of the choose your own adventure books. Not my cup of tea but it would be interesting to see more.

If the story is so great, and the gameplay is so lacking, then why not just save 60 bucks, watch a playthrough of the game online, and use your saved money on something else? Like food, or water, or bills, or medicine for your puppy...

It'd be like watching a movie where you have no control over whats happening IN the movie! Which just makes it like a regular movie...

I would like to see this "GaMovie" reviewed on "Escape to the Movies"...

From the article:

"True, Heavy Rain alone cannot save them. But if it flops, it would be sending a message to publishers the world over - a message that says gamers don't want story, gamers don't want mature themes. Instead, let's see what else we can pin existing mechanics onto instead. Has anyone tried God of War in space yet? "

Ooh! God of War in space! Now THAT'S an idea :P

No, I do beleive you're wrong. It wasn't revolutionary. It is a gimmick.

They could have made a CGI movie and it would be exactly the same.

A game can fucking have story. Everything is good in moderation.

Sorry for not jumping on the stupid bandwagon of, "So mature!" No. It's not. And it was lazy.

So, judging by all the "This was the first time my stoic heart has stirred for a digital representation of human life" stuff being flung around, I trust I'm the only person who teared up at the death of Paul Jackson in Modern Warfare? (Griggs too) I mean, I didn't cry full out, but damn, that was not right.

On topic, I enjoyed the Heavy Rain demo, the fight with customer was pretty intense, and investigating as the cop was pretty cool (I felt so smart for checking up the near the freeway while the dumb cops milled around, disturbing the crime scene), so I would definitely check the game out. However, your article fails to move me because you shoot yourself in the foot with a list of problems (voice acting, bugs, writing, etc.). You really should have basically ignored these flaws if you wanted your article to successfully win people over. After all, if they are so unimportant next to the grand human achievement of promoting HR, why did you feel the need to discuss them?

llafnwod:
Like a lot of people here, I've got to agree that saying the war in the game industry is between games like Halo and Heavy Rain is presenting a false dichotomy. An evocative story and engaging gameplay don't have to be mutually exclusive; in fact, in a good game, the two compliment each other.

All I ask is that you consider where you want this industry to go. Heavy Rain asks how far you are willing to go to save somebody you love.

Guess what? Shadow of the Colossus asked the same question, and it did it with fantastic gameplay and something like three lines of dialogue.

Actually Shadow of the Colossus asked if you'd be willing to save the princess from the assorted monsters. Of course I'm over simplifying it but to say that is the same as a reflection of moral everyday life then I'd like to know how many giants you climbed yesterday. And I'm not trying to knock Shadow, I'm just saying it's trying to compare apples to ambrosia. Could someone you love be taken by a sadistic serial killer? Considering the statistical data on active serial killers in the US alone, well it's more of a reality then it is having to face a monster the size of the Empire State Building.

I have this game, and I honestly enjoy it. I agree with those who have said that it's unfair to qualify this as a "QTE Choose your own path Book" since there's more subtlety then that. In many ways Mass Effect is very much a choose your own path book with different gameplay mechanics. So some will like Mass Effect and some will like Heavy Rain, so why can't we have both? Those who like one will go one way and those who like the other will go that way. I like my stupid shoot em ups, but I like something different once and a while. And I like a game where I feel like I'm taking part instead of a game where I'm pressing buttons on a pop up menu to do things. But I also like games that have the menus. I don't understand why this has to be such a division.

But that's my two, I could be wrong.

This game has pretty much halved the gaming community. Some people don't regard it as a game, whilst others simply want it for the storyline.

I honestly see no reason why Heavy Rain couldn't play on a BluRay player instead of a PS3 though. It could litterally just use the remote control to make the decisions, because no matter how many people have tried to sway me the other way, I don't accept Heavy Rain as a game. It has the same capabilites as my DVD version of Trivial Pursuit, and that gives me a different experience everytime I play it too.

And my, GOD. For what I can say for the storyline, it really does look bad. Each character is just a giant cliche. I mean, they've even got a giant, gun-totting, gangsta black guy. COME ON.

Sparrow:
I honestly see no reason why Heavy Rain couldn't play on a BluRay player instead of a PS3 though. It could litterally just use the remote control to make the decisions, because no matter how many people have tried to sway me the other way, I don't accept Heavy Rain as a game. It has the same capabilites as my DVD version of Trivial Pursuit, and that gives me a different experience everytime I play it too.

I know, that with your current attitude you probably don't want to hear about buying or even renting the game, but do you have a friend or someone like that who has PS3 and bought this game? If yes, ask him, if you can play HR on his console for a bit. If you won't like it, and still think it's a movie with mass of QTE's - fine. But right now, you're not even giving the chance for this game to prove you otherwise, and that's unfair.

As I said in my previous posts, those QTE's are perfectly blending with the game after some time, and if you'll feel the game, it's no longer 'press x to don't mess up' but really punching, avoiding the blow, driving the car, swinging the golf club etc. etc. I remember I caught myself on that, when as Madison I was interrogating one guy, and when there was an option to slap him in his face, I didn't simply move my controller to the left - I really made full action of slapping someone (though with controller in my hand rather than open palm :P). The same thing, when someone tried to hit me with a pipe - with controller command I was making doges right along the hero. And it was fun, believe me.

And my, GOD. For what I can say for the storyline, it really does look bad. Each character is just a giant cliche. I mean, they've even got a giant, gun-totting, gangsta black guy. COME ON.

1) Mad Jack isn't really that 'gangsta', and he never actually uses the gun, except from pointing it once at Jayden before the fight. He really is 'Mad' though... O.o

2) The premise and some of the characters may look cliche to you, but again - after spending some time with the game, you'll see there's much more depth in those guys, and the story really is great and surprising. Sure, there are some plot holes, as in every other story, but not that much to affect the overall view of the plot. Really. Try it, and you'll see.

Christian Ward:

Whether you like the game or not, if you care about seeing real emotional drama in videogames, you need to buy Heavy Rain.

Thank you. I was on the fence about this game, but after I read this thread I decided to give it a chance and went out and bought it. I've only played about 2 hours thus far, but it is one of the most unique and fascinating game experiences I have ever played. I'm very glad I picked this one up, and very much hope this helps to expand the type and variety of games we see in the future. So, thanks for the advice.

Yossarian1507:
*sniiiiip!*

This might sound a little odd, but I'm actually sided with you on this point. I've not actually played the game, and most of my opinions are based off of videos of it I've seen on Youtube.

That's exactly the problem though. Unless I can find someone to steal this off of, I'm not going to buy it. Simply because, I don't like of the look of it, and with today's current game prices, I'm not going to spend 40 on a game I don't like the look of.

So, I'm generally screwed, and I'll never be able to create a concrete opinion of this game.

Jumplion:
I just want to note that that actually goes hand in hand with what a lot of people do when under stress, they end up saying something completely different from what they meant to. In this case, if you're faced with a difficult decision in Heavy Rain but the choices are all jumbled up, like the characters emotions at the time (life in danger or something), then anyone could say something that they never meant to.

Just wanted to point that out, it's actually pretty interesting when I think about it.

This had occurred to me, and it's what I think they were going for, but there are some times it doesn't make as much sense. The most clear example in my game was when the psychologist asked Ethan what he thought of Shaun, and I immediately thought "distant" but accidentally said "disappointed" instead, and given that I had played the last scene well and had the little moment with Shaun where he tried to tell me it wasn't my fault, I didn't really feel at all like he was disappointed in me.

But that's hardly a big deal. It succeeded far more than it failed. Far more.

I'm about 60% through my second playthrough and I find the whole story gripping, although the (actually pretty likable) killer is a little implausible. I actually wrote down as I went through the game the first time all the major decisions I was making and then did the opposite the second time. The story doesn't change radically unless you let chracters die, but the level of characterisation is very impressive.

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