EA: Making DRM Disappear in One Easy Step

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EA: Making DRM Disappear in One Easy Step

Will DRM by any other name still stink up the joint?

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Well, luckily for us, and quite unfortunately for EA, there are definitely enough people that are going to throw this whole "It's not DRM" bullshit in their face, over and over and over again. Maybe they don't actually know what DRM stands for. Maybe they think it's the brand name of whatever DRM they used to use. This is giving them the benefit of the doubt, while not actually saying that EA actually has any level of intelligence in their PR heads. But regardless, they can say it all they want, it's the same ole shit that is gonna hold me back from buying games they publish.

Way to go, EA. Good thing there's nothing on yer horizon I could possibly care less about.

They can name it whatever they want. Gamer's should subject themselves to a system where the publisher is in full control of the game. I want to be able to play my games in 10 or 20 years. I don't want to have to download a crack just because the developer's servers are not up anymore.

for 50 euros I think i have the right to play a single player game when and where i want, without the need of an internet connection. For 50 euros i'm buying a game, not renting it.

Freemon:
They can name it whatever they want. Gamer's should subject themselves to a system where the publisher is in full control of the game. I want to be able to play my games in 10 or 20 years. I don't want to have to download a crack just because the developer's servers are not up anymore.

who do you think usually makes these kinda decisions? It certainly is not the developer. Publishers like EA are the ones cramming this crap down our throat, and in turn causing those developers to lose more money than they'd lose due to pirating. If anything, we need to put full control back into the hands of the developers. Publishers do nothing but create problems by throwing out deadlines, pushing out incomplete games, and making DRM mandatory.

See, if this was a multi-player only title, they could actually say that and not really be lying - one hardly views the requirement for a constant internet connection to play WoW as a form of DRM after all. All the 'benefits' EA was touting? All of those features are how MMOs traditionally operate, since the account is all important and they could care less how many machines you actually use to access it, ergo no installation limits, etc..

But I'm pretty sure C&C4 has a single player portion, placing this firmly back into the Ubisoft and AC2 category of PR nonsense. I'll give EA some credit though, as they are certainly better at it than Ubisoft - if I read their announcement without critically examining it, it really does sound like a good thing they are doing.

I can't wait to see "EA servers down on opening day" and "Cyber Terrorists behind attack EA servers" to start popping up in the news section.

The 'progressive' approach here is hilarious.

DeadlyYellow:
I can't wait to see "EA servers down on opening day" and "[b]Cyber Terrorists[/b] behind attack EA servers" to start popping up in the news section.

The 'progressive' approach here is hilarious.

If that does happen there shall be more than a few chuckles and red faces I am sure...as Ubisoft found out Oh so well.

I think the DRM thing is here to stay, in one form or another...but it seemes everyone has there own name for it

Hooray!

Now EA are going to hemorage more money!

Still, was nice of them standing up for PC gamers.

Christ EA. You guys are off your rocker, aren't you? This is still DRM.

My god I hope they do not implement this kind of bullshit into Crysis 2.

Ah good, nice of EA to go back to the old template we know and love after all that 'release quality games and respect your customers' bullshit. That's for communists!

Yep, it's good to see them doing what they do best, relentlessly talking down to their customers and being about as far from passionate and creative development as Kim Jong il is from mental health.

On a serious note, I shall not be buying C&C4. The DRM does play a factor, but mainly because it looks like it's going to be a soggy condom of a game.

Its funny, because most people tech-savvy enough to be enraged by DRM will still recognise Ea's "not" DRM for what it is, so their postings where entirely pointless and do nothing but further resentment towards them.

On one hand, I have to applaud EA for trying to convince gamers that it's not that bad with a bunch of perks that come with it. On the other hand, it seems like a more annoying version of Steamworks, with less features.

But hey, at least they're trying.

So basically, EA has discovered the miracle of doublespeak, sort of like the time when the Bush administration solved the problem of hunger in America by renaming it: "There are no hungry people anymore--now there are just people who occasionally experience 'low food security.'"

Although I don't like the system, at least this is marginally better than Ubisoft's approach, you do get something, just not a very good something, in return for putting up with their DRM (ie. continued ability to communicate with the community while in any sort of game and cross single-player multiplayer experience gains). I still believe that something needs to be done to stop pirates and I hope that if this path is inevitable, judging by the fact that 2 major developers are doing it it looks like it might be going that way, the EA system where they at least give you improved features in return is a bit better. Maybe in time the developers will come up with particularly good systems for forcing you to be online at all times when playing that give you loads of features that just wouldn't be possible in a purely offline game, I doubt it, but it would be a form of DRM that I would be happier with.

Great, only problem: C&C 4: Cracked and fully playable.

Assassins Creed 2: Not cracked and missions aren't playable.

This is genius, it's evil, but it's genius. It's already too late for gamers to win this fight. It's was over when people bought assassin's creed 2 on the PC. Have you ever tried to win an argument against someone using circular logic? It can't be done.

Can't wait for the "they have a right to protect their product" people to start posting. that always gets a couple laughs from me.

Andy Chalk:
But what EA is doing instead is providing a service and making the experience better. You can create multiple "Commander Personas" under the single EA Master Account required by the game, and you can install it from the game disc on as many computers as you like. You can log in and play from any computer that has C&C4 installed. Stats, achievements and experience points will be updated instantly, on the fly. You don't even need the disc in the drive! Let's see you do that with an offline game.

But that's just a lesser Steam... Without the all-important Offline Mode.

dochmbi:

Assassins Creed 2: Not cracked and missions aren't playable.

Someone on this forum says they know someone who's played it without problems (they pirated it obviously).

This wouldn't be bad if always-on internet was universal with a 0% dropout rate. The benefits it brings are actually pretty great.

But it's still DRM, by definition. At the end of the day you have to be logged in for authentication. If that doesn't fall under the heading of digital rights management I don't know what does. You can't just lie your way out of it.

The other day Cliffy B posted on Twitter something along the lines of "since when is Steam not a form of DRM?" which led to me having a debate with my wife about what constitutes DRM. Ultimately we agreed any form of digital copy protection - from CD-keys to Ubisoft's DRM - is Digital Rights Management by definition, and the fact that it exists is not in and of itself a bad thing.

But what we have come to know as DRM is something else. It's a remorseless, gamestealing beast. It is a gentle nuzzling on our shoulder that reminds us that erect gamedev penises are in place, ready to rape our precious gaming buttholes at any time. It's a DRM that requires an always-on connection. It's needing to login for authentication every time. It's install limits. It installs spyware on our computers and sometimes it just doesn't let us play the game no matter how many arbitrary conditions we meet.

When people think of DRM they don't think of good, thoughtful, helpful Digital Rights Management. They think of the villainised DRM you might see in a propoganda cartoon. EA thinks by presenting a good image they are evading the definition of DRM and they are not.

The difference between Ubisoft and EA right now is marketing.

Ubisoft said "you will need an always on internet connection" and gamers told them to fuck off.
EA says "there is no DRM... but look at all this cool shit we're letting you do by requiring you have an always on internet connection!" and hope gamers keep remembering it's not DRM when the authentication servers go down.

So that's EA off my companies to buy games from list. At this rate I'll be finding a new hobby.

Actually, that may have already happened, in 2009 I spent less than 50 on gaming. It's an unfortunate side effect of this stupid, stupid corporate thinking (it's not what we're doing that's the problem, it's how we're packaging it) that they are driving away the paying customer. On the plus side my mountain biking's got a load better.

If someone were to ask me, legal rammifications aside, why they should not pirate games now, I'm not sure I could tell them. Whether they do or don't they're going to be treated as a criminal, they may as well be treated as a criminal with a larger bank balance.

Apparently EA spells bullshit with a capitol Z, but it's still bullshit.

It's past time the gaming community actually does something together and reject Ubisoft and EA bs DRM claims and not buy the games. We'd all be better off without these publishers.

"There...ARE....FOUR....LIGHTS!"

And, there is DRM.

Sorry EA, ain't buying it. Unless I am playing online multiplayer, I should not need my connection to be used to verify that I have indeed purchased the game. So goodbye DRM, you will be washed away with the next extra-legal patch that comes out, most likely before the game itself is actually released.

It's a smart move to paint it as a service being provided. That's a model that works for all online games - you log into your account to track your progress/stats in the online world, or to access the server browser, perhaps with associated stat tracking. Peachy, fine and dandy - expected.

Now, you start doing this to single player games and the people revolt. There's no reason (beyond managing someone's rights to use your product) to have to log into a world-wide web to have a quiet game alone. Stats can be uploaded if you want by logging into an online database - no need to have the game servers peering over your shoulder the whole time.

It becomes even more infuriating when you just want to play the game without worrying about stat tracking and messages and monitored progress and all that jazz, not to mention the software taking up your bandwidth to do little more than spy on you.

Gah, I wish violence to those that would blindly follow systems like these. Less so if you genuinely believe that it's a good idea after critically considering all aspects of the issue, but still...

I've been kinda confused on this whole matter. Yes its DRM, but isn't it the same type of DRM employed by using the Steam client? Everyone seems to be cool with that, yet they're up in arms over it being applied to specific games not sold through Steam?

JaredXE:
"There...ARE....FOUR....LIGHTS!"

Best ending to a TNG episode ever XD

-EDIT-
This was applied to Portal and Half-Life through steam and many other single-player game, why is this such a shock now?

so its not drm? its an mmo now?

Its bullshit for C&C4 but its one of thoes things Im not sure if its really worth worrying about since so far its just on one game, one game Ill never buy but only one game, I mean if they also pulled it with bad company 2 or mass effect 2 then it would be much more worrying.

dochmbi:
Great, only problem: C&C 4: Cracked and fully playable.

Assassins Creed 2: Not cracked and missions aren't playable.

AC2 was cracked two days before release...?

who buys this shit anyway? i mean the game is terrible

They stopped raping us with a sandpaper dick, and we breathed a sigh of relief, only to find out they replaced the sandpaper dick with a greek column coated with spikes... and soaked in chlorine trifluoride.

KeyMaster45:

-EDIT-
This was applied to Portal and Half-Life through steam and many other single-player game, why is this such a shock now?

I'm pretty sure i can play steam games in offline mode

"Let's see you do that with an offline game."
C:\Users\Lord Honk\Documents\My Games\Fallout3\Saves\Lord Honk\*.*, copy.
USB-Stick, 5$, paste.
ZOMG, that really is a lot of work, and I couldn't even make use of my internet connection =0
I can understand login during game start, but i can't understand why the last hour i've played this one mission just goes to waste because i get disconnected (router likes reconnecting when data fluctuates too much) just during the ending cutscene.
I can't believe i'm saying this, but for the sake of my sanity, can't we just go back to our securom bull manure? at least i knew the game would run once i got it to work =/

€: yes, steam has offline mode. dawn of war 2 is a nice example, you need GFWL (urg) and steam, but you can have offline profiles for both.

Worgen:
so its not drm? its an mmo now?

Its bullshit for C&C4 but its one of thoes things Im not sure if its really worth worrying about since so far its just on one game, one game Ill never buy but only one game, I mean if they also pulled it with bad company 2 or mass effect 2 then it would be much more worrying.

Why would they put it on just one game? That would not make sense. They will most likely do what Ubisoft is doing and implement this DRM on all their future releases.

Nesrie:
It's past time the gaming community actually does something together and reject Ubisoft and EA bs DRM claims and not buy the games. We'd all be better off without these publishers.

I'm all for a proper consumer rebellion the shame of this is of course that the publishers make decisions like these, but the developers that actually make the game are forced to watch thier work thrown to the sharks. I was actually close to prepurchasing C&C 4, then I scrolled down and saw that EA had jumped on the UBIsoft train, glad i read the fine print.

It's amazing how dense of a mindset it must take to use this form of DRM in particular. I know we've hashed this a million times now on this forum, but do they really not see that they've created a weapon that only hurts thier customer. Companies that sell digital products need to get it through thier heads that pirates should not be part of the equation. The guy that was gonna pirate C&C 4 is not going to be discouraged by the fact that a crack wasn't available on day 1 and go out and buy a legit copy. He'll just wait til its finally cracked, or forget the game. The pirate is not a customer, no DRM will turn him into one. However, cumbersome enough DRM can lose customers, and in some cases even turn customers pirate.
If somone wants very much to play a game but have decided that your DRM is too akward for them to give you money, they do have a 3rd option, get a cracked copy.

I myself am truly a lost sale, my fingers seconds away from the buy button, when i read the dreaded words "persistant internet connection". A persistant internet connection is probably not an issue for most, but that's not all thats required, you must also be persistantly connected to an EA server, which is probably sitting in the sites of a million string botnet. My money was real sales increase, what sort of gains do you see on your sales for "pirate who is not playing on day1"? you can stop 10000 pirates you won't make a single extra dime, and turning off a customer denies you whatever your cut of the 50bucks was gonna be. That's not good math, not for the devs, not for the publishers, and not for the legit gamers that wanted to enjoy your product.

Ah well, I didn't buy C&C3, so It's not like I'm going to buy this one anyway.

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