Science!: Fat and Force Fields

Science!: Fat and Force Fields

Inside: Army develops the force field.

Read Full Article

I remmber reading the Force Field thing on BBC earlier last week...I was like O.O!

Now...that would certainly make terrorists look the other way lol

Very cool discoveries, I always look forward to Science!

Would be great if the fat becomes the treatment to everything.
Fatal heart attack caused by beign obese, saved.. by being obese.
I like it!

The forcefield thingy is nice, but could only be applied to tanks which don't have an infantry detail. Consider if the propelled bullet or missile hit the ground next to the tank. It would certainly injure soldiers.
They are actually using a similar approach, but instead of electrical bursts, they have explosives attached to the tank. Whenever a missile hits the armor (and an explosive) it detonates, leaving a manageable hole in the tank and propelling the missile away from the tank. This, too, is only used without infantry details.

Nincompoop wants ice-cream too... damn you!

I'm a bit skeptical on the claim of "would easily deflect the round." Using the given example of an RPG, those rounds require direct contact with the metallic skin of the vehicle in order to achieve penetration. If a tank is wrapped in chicken wire that is offset from the vehicle by about a foot, you can prematurely trigger the RPG and make a much-less armored vehicle survive the hit.

On the topic of fat scaffolds though...

Brilliant.

Nincompoop:
T
They are actually using a similar approach, but instead of electrical bursts, they have explosives attached to the tank. Whenever a missile hits the armor (and an explosive) it detonates, leaving a manageable hole in the tank and propelling the missile away from the tank. This, too, is only used without infantry details.

I don't think reactive armor even leaves a hole in the struck tank; the force of the shaped incoming charge is counterbalanced by the explosive force of the shaped charge in the reactive armor, and the two shaped charges essentially cancel one another. I do not know what the effect of a "silver bullet" heavy AP slug has on reactive armor though, I would postulate that it is not highly effective. Perhaps reactive armor would work best on explosives but the supercapicator idea would effect more dense armor piercing dead-weight shells?

Thats it, I'm going to attach a supercapacitor to my car and go cyclist repelling. I'm also going to get liposuction and have me a spare liver made.
Then I'll get me an ice-cream :P

Idlemessiah:
Thats it, I'm going to attach a supercapacitor to my car and go cyclist repelling.

Now that's a good idea!

Insects that breath underwater, they know the score. Global warming is real and they have already adapted.

Can the tank still fire its weapons if the electrical shield is active? If not then all an RPG team has to do is cycle their fire so the tank can't fire long enough for someone to get in close with an explosive charge and set it near the tank.

Since fat could be helpful in stem cell research, all the Lutherans out there who oppose progress will have something new to oppose.

Force field you say? So thats where all the mad scientists have gone! You clever pom's you!

I positively love reading this series. Also, I'm now imagining hovertanks with lasers and forcefields.

Nice stories - from the water and air breathing caterpillars to the force fields and so forth, all interesting stories - looking forward to the next one!

So basically what you're telling me about the tank armor is that my idea of playing tank-RPG-Pong isn't going to happen unless they find a way to charge the shields super-quick and the people operating them are very good at their jobs? Way to make me very sad Lauren. Shame on you.

Few things are as refreshing as knowing that leading scientists in their fields can still sometimes look at something like a caterpillar and go, 'wtf?' That's what science really is.

Those human evolutionary offshots make me sad because they mean a fantasy world with elves is not scientifically feasible. We'd have eaten the elves! :-(

I look at that force field and keep remembering how shortly after X-rays were invented people would be using it all the time without any protection because they didn't know it causes cancer. I know anyone not living on a shack on a mountain is probably in the middle of a bunch of electromagnetic fields, but I keep thinking something awful will happen down the line.

I want ice cream too.

I'm gonna put a bunch of supercapacitor at the bottom of my shoes, so when I go over a metal surface, I could suddenly jump 6 feet in the air.

Awesome.

This is just a big magnet. What if the attacks use plastic bullets or explosives?

force fields... check. all we need are flying cars and we are officially in the future.

The Random One:
Those human evolutionary offshots make me sad because they mean a fantasy world with elves is not scientifically feasible. We'd have eaten the elves! :-(

Of course. Elves is good eatin'. :)

The Random One:
I look at that force field and keep remembering how shortly after X-rays were invented people would be using it all the time without any protection because they didn't know it causes cancer.

Was worse with radium. All those poor watch dial painters.... And then the people who drank soft drinks with added radium for improving their health!

And then there's stuff like those drawings from 1910 about the year 2000: http://1.bp.blogspot.com/_sGYULzoQCgA/RuSVOqUY0CI/AAAAAAAABDo/xderWVHa-o0/s1600-h/Heating+with+Radium.jpg

The Random One:
I know anyone not living on a shack on a mountain is probably in the middle of a bunch of electromagnetic fields, but I keep thinking something awful will happen down the line.

I'd think it would've happened by now. While a powerful electromagnetic field can be bad for you, it has to be IIRC well past wipe-your-credit-cards level before it's immediately bad. Less than that? We're drenched in it every day. Hasn't killed anyone yet. I know there's some debate about power lines but I'd rather not get into that - don't have the patience for a debate today.

And as to military uses, I wonder which is worse, being around a strong magnetic field or being inside something with depleted uranium for armor? (Though generally it's the guys shooting at you that are worse for your health than either one of those....)

The Random One:
I want ice cream too.

<AOL>Me too!</AOL>

Lauren Admire:
Apparently this technology has been long coming. During a test in 2002, the charged force field armor was able to survive repeated RPG attacks, sustaining only minor damage.

That was different armor, a different prototype using different technology. It explains that in the article. Force-field technology has not been tested/implemented successfully yet.

Don't get your hopes up.

I posted about this misconception in a different thread. Even did some sample calculations which showed implausibility.

If inexpensive chicken wire or metal cages deflect RPGs better or as good as the single-shot EM field, too bad for the EM field. There ain't infinite money in the world.

Depleted Uranium is...pretty safe. I'd rather encase myself in a DU tank than try my armored body against bullets and explosives any day of the week.

And that, as they say, is that.

I love explosives!

Anyway, chicken wire is extremely effective against RPG attacks since to achieve the armor penetration anti-tank weapons rely on the Munroe Effect. Essentially there is a hollow cone inside the explosive charge that when detonated focuses the explosive power onto a single point instead of exploding in all directions at once. Since the Munroe Effect requires that the explosives be detonated a specific distance from the target to achieve maximum penetration then early detonation due to a chicken wire screen will nullify the armor-killing quality of the anti-tank round. Also the RPG is especially vulnerable because of its lower muzzle velocity and impact detonator, if it were to hit a chain link fence there is a good chance it will not detonate and simply get stuck or bounce off.

Reactive armor (explosives attached to tanks to deflect missiles) will negate the shaped charge's effect by sympathetic detonation. Since the superheated jet of gas formed by the shaped charge will detonate the explosive armor the reactive armor will dissipate the Munroe Effect thus rendering the attack ineffective. Explosions travel along the paths of least resistance, so an explosive detonating on top of an armor plate will direct the majority of its energy outward and thus cause little to no damage to the actual armor.

Depleted Uranium, while not nearly radioactive as natural uranium is still radioactive and on top of that is also a toxic heavy metal. You may think thats not too much of a problem, but like all metals exposed to explosions some of it will still vaporize. So if your depleted uranium armor tank is hit by an RPG, it might not penetrate but it did just create a cloud of slightly radioactive and highly toxic metal particles for all to enjoy.

I worked for 4 years as an Anti-Tank Assaultman in the US Marine Corps and have extensive experience with most forms of explosives. I love talking about demolitions, anyone interested in knowing more can send me a message.

Ever since I heard that a magnetic field can create a force on a charged particle I wondered if it was possible to use an electric field to charge surrounding objects and resist their movements and this is giving my "theory" some support.

Ugh. I've always hated that term. Force field, that is. It doesn't make any scientific sense. It's almost worse than the whole "energy weapon" thing. Besides, a tank with this technology wouldn't have an actual force field, just super-capacitor armor.

CuddlyCombine:
Ugh. I've always hated that term. Force field, that is. It doesn't make any scientific sense. It's almost worse than the whole "energy weapon" thing. Besides, a tank with this technology wouldn't have an actual force field, just super-capacitor armor.

Well if it moans, shuffles , is reanimated and goes down in a headshot why not call it a zombie? (<-- Metaphor for the slow 'uns). It actually Might be helpful to call something by its fictional counter-parts name, after all their are normal people who arrange funding and the word "Force Field" might open some imaginations and wallets.

Real Life Scorched Earth, here I come!

CuddlyCombine:
Ugh. I've always hated that term. Force field, that is. It doesn't make any scientific sense. It's almost worse than the whole "energy weapon" thing. Besides, a tank with this technology wouldn't have an actual force field, just super-capacitor armor.

I don't mind it so much, but it seems like a pretty general term. Gravity is a field that can exert force, thus it is a force field. As are electric and magnetic fields. I don't see the problem.

008Zulu:

Can the tank still fire its weapons if the electrical shield is active? If not then all an RPG team has to do is cycle their fire so the tank can't fire long enough for someone to get in close with an explosive charge and set it near the tank.

That depends on how it works, and if it is applied to the whole vehicle. In principle though, if the shape of the field is planned properly, it shouldn't affect the tank's own weapons, or may even assist them.

Epoetker:
If inexpensive chicken wire or metal cages deflect RPGs better or as good as the single-shot EM field, too bad for the EM field. There ain't infinite money in the world.

Depleted Uranium is...pretty safe. I'd rather encase myself in a DU tank than try my armored body against bullets and explosives any day of the week.

And that, as they say, is that.

The article didn't say single-shot;
It more or less said it was short-lived.

That is, when activated, the field would be effective for about 1 second.
That doesn't say anything about how often it could be activated, or the delay afterwards before you could use it again.

The main implication is that you would have to time the activation so that it is active at the moment of impact.

You can't just turn it on and then forget about it.

Good read! I do like me some science!

Heh. I love these. Thin skin which allows water & oxygen to diffuse through it would be the same way amphibians breathe. They've got lungs, but the lungs aren't sufficient to supply their bodies with oxygen by themselves, which is why frogs/toads need to be kept moist. It's not a surprise that the insect in the article may breathe the same way.

The Random One:
Few things are as refreshing as knowing that leading scientists in their fields can still sometimes look at something like a caterpillar and go, 'wtf?' That's what science really is.

Those human evolutionary offshots make me sad because they mean a fantasy world with elves is not scientifically feasible. We'd have eaten the elves! :-(

I look at that force field and keep remembering how shortly after X-rays were invented people would be using it all the time without any protection because they didn't know it causes cancer. I know anyone not living on a shack on a mountain is probably in the middle of a bunch of electromagnetic fields, but I keep thinking something awful will happen down the line.

I want ice cream too.

Yeah, I like wtfs as much as I like ice cream.

More offshots that we, sadly, killed.

 

Reply to Thread

Log in or Register to Comment
Have an account? Login below:
With Facebook:Login With Facebook
or
Username:  
Password:  
  
Not registered? To sign up for an account with The Escapist:
Register With Facebook
Register With Facebook
or
Registered for a free account here