249: Corporate Fanfic

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Corporate Fanfic

You may think fanfiction is a laughable attempt at literature. But did you know you've probably already paid good money for it? Dillon Sinnott examines the phenomenon of "corporate fanfiction," when a company ditches the canon to make a quick buck.

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You know, I think someone who wrote a rather lengthy poem about learning to abstain from all sin, including those of passion such as furiously butchering things, would have had some problem with being portrayed doing just that.

And after checking wiki he didnt seem to have much of a revelation at the end which could have been redeeming, he still insisted on smiting stuff.

Sorry probably not that relevant but I read The Inferno shortly before they anounced the game and it makes me pretty angry that they bastardise his name like that, calling the game "The Inferno" and changing the protagonist's name would make it a little easier to swallow.

/rant

Fists:
You know, I think someone who wrote a rather lengthy poem about learning to abstain from all sin, including those of passion such as furiously butchering things, would have had some problem with being portrayed doing just that.

And after checking wiki he didnt seem to have much of a revelation at the end which could have been redeeming, he still insisted on smiting stuff.

Sorry probably not that relevant but I read The Inferno shortly before they anounced the game and it makes me pretty angry that they bastardise his name like that, calling the game "The Inferno" and changing the protagonist's name would make it a little easier to swallow.

/rant

I really don't think he would mind at all. After all, he did put everyone who made his life miserable in hell and had himself being buddies with Virgil and having an dead saint talk to his lover so that she could call Virgil to help Dante. Keep in mind that this was a Saint that he later put on the same level as Adam when he went up to heaven, meaning that he thought his quest was pretty important if she had to be the messanger. Sure he was a violent crusader in the game, but Dante himself might have used that to once again bash the church's corruption as he did in his own poem so many times.

As for me, I actually liked how the game turned out, but that's partly because I've accepted that Dante isn't actually the Florentine, and that the game's called what it is only because it's taking place in the world envisioned by the actual Dante known as the Infenro.

Was wondering if the first post would be horror over Dante's Inferno or horror over a Monopoly movie. And I thought when Robot Chicken turned the Hungry Hungry Hippos into a cop movie ("Hungry... FOR JUSTICE!") it was a joke.

You figure Variety was making a stealth joke when they said 'The property with the most current momentum is "Monopoly," which Ridley Scott and Scott Free have been developing.' I know they're Hollywood terms, but come on, property? Developing?

Fists:
You know, I think someone who wrote a rather lengthy poem about learning to abstain from all sin, including those of passion such as furiously butchering things, would have had some problem with being portrayed doing just that.

Methinks the depiction of Beatrice would be the first thing he'd take issue with. But that's just me.

Fists:

Sorry probably not that relevant but I read The Inferno shortly before they anounced the game and it makes me pretty angry that they bastardise his name like that, calling the game "The Inferno" and changing the protagonist's name would make it a little easier to swallow.

/rant

I don't know. The fanbase was bound to be unpleasable on this one. I just can't believe the cheap bastards released the Longfellow translation with a game art cover. If it had been a modern translation, I'd actually defend them a bit. But Longfellow. Bloody hard to read but free to publish without having to pay Ciardi, Pinsky, Mandelbaum, et al. for their work. That's the real disservice here - the cheap money grab from teenagers who judge the book by its cover, trying to sell itself as a way of introducing people to the classics.

My problem with the Watchmen film wasn't what it changed, not directly. My problem with it came as a result of some of those changes and more importantly, because of the changes of the medium. My problem was simply this: It watered down the message and characters. Let me throw down an example before MovieBob tears my head off (AWOOOOOGA, MASSIVE SPOILERS OFF THE PORT BOW):

In both the comic and the movie, the final moments of Rorschach are taken as he heads off to go warn the world of what had happened, forsaking world peace for his own sense of right and wrong. Dr. Manhattan comes out to stop him. So far so good, right?

In the comic however, there is no commentary from Rorschach on the morals of it, no Nite Owl. He simply tears off his mask, crying for the first time since we saw him cry in flashback and screams at Dr. Manhattan to just do it. Meanwhile, Nite Owl is upstairs sleeping with Silk Specter. It was a HEARTBREAKING moment, precisely because of the subtleties of the moment.

In the movie however, he gives some half-assed lecture to Dr. Manhattan about how this is his fault, and when Dr. Manhattan does it, Nite Owl drops to his knees screaming and gives another half-assed lecture and I was sitting there wondering how Zack had managed to ruin the most moving scene in the comic.

I'm still not sure where I stand on the Watchmen movie. It wasn't the generic action-flick that was League of Extraordinary Gentlemen film, nor did it's point, story, characters and themes get quite as neutered as in V for Vendetta (a okay enough film on it's own, but when compared to the comic, it's pathetic). I guess they did as well as they could with a Watchmen film...

I also guess that's not good enough.

Actually I can think of one comic to movie adaptation that was pretty good, faithful to the original and didn't fundamentally alter any of it's characters.

Hellboy

I know no the greatest of the comic books or movies but with the writer Mike Magnolia tied closely to the project and director del Torro no going crazy for computer generated effects (Lucas, Bay) both movies did turn out pretty good.

This article reminds me of Max Payne the movie. I being the Max Payne fanboy that I am thought it was a great idea at the time. Was quite afraid at first but I asked myself "With such a great plot and simple concept, how could they mess it up?" Dear God in heaven was I wrong. You would think a story about a cop going after the mafia and a corporation after his family died as being easy to grip, but no, the movie was fucking awful. Not only did it end in some kind of stupid attempt at a cliffhanger (Which no doubly would have led to a second movie) but the entire first part of the story was cut out completely. Character casting, direction, special effects (Aside from the well done but pointless angel scenes) were so fucking bad I couldn't believe that they could be serious with thinking this movie would be anything other than a box office disaster. The worst part is that Sam Lake himself was part of the writing team for the movie, I won't go with the cliche "He sold out", but he should at least feel embarrassed about how stupidly his story was twisted to appear "artsy", not for sake of being better, but out of some shallow attempt to be diffrent from other action movies. A move demanded by no other than the movie studio funding the film. Sometimes movies are doomed just by the greed, over thinking and pure incompetency of the suits.

Honestly it was the buildup to the Watchmen movie that kind of ruined it for me; months of interviews with Snyder playing up how faithful the movie would be to the book. And then... it wasn't. It kept the characters--kind of--and went through the motions, but it replaced crucial and characterful dialogue with Hollywood mush, played self-depreciating parts straight, and glorified in the violence Moore was writing against, radically changing the tone if not the message of the original... Apparently in Snyder's mind a deluge of f-bombs and gore are all that's required to tell an "adult story", without regard for subtlety or maturity. And seriously, a faithful adaptation means more than making sure the props in the background match the comic panels perfectly.

Don't get me wrong, it was an entertaining audio-visual spectacle that genuinely felt like a labour of love, and of course there's no way everything could have been crammed into one film. I did enjoy it; but I felt a little cheated at just how far the film deviated from its roots in ways beyond costume and colour scheme.

By contrast I totally loved Sin City, which I thought preserved the grit, tone and spirit of the comics, without compromising the entertainment value of the end result. "Put the original creator in the director's seat"? Fuckin' A.

...Not that Frank Miller's other attempt at directing was exactly stellar...

I think some games newer ittorations decend into fanfic. Most recently Moder Warfare 2 felt like it had been written by a deranged fan of both the original modern warfare and every micheal Bay movie ever made.

I think the same was true for Bioshock 2, sure it was well crafted but the very idea of being a Big Daddy with a drill for an entire game was one i first heard and dissmissed in gushing fan forums.

There also tends towards fanservice and thereby fanfic ideas in many Japanses games and many of the Final Fantasy games. FF X-2 is a great example whereby Rikku was used almost purely for fanservice.

Rikku when't from this;
image

To this;

image

FanFic eat your heart out.

Also SHE'S FIFTEEN!. Yeah you feel bad now don't you.

While I agree that most major movie adaptations tend to lack whatever was good about the original work, I think that this is primarily a result of the people who decide what gets made usually not caring at all whether or not something can work in a different medium. As a result, I find that lower budget budget and less main-stream adaptations are often of a higher quality because someone had to actually care to make them.

Lately, I've been finding that reimaginings which use the original as a jumping off point to do something completely different with the idea can be quite entertaining and often help me to see the original in a new light. Done properly, such creations display what the person who made them found to be most interesting or compelling in the source material, which makes for an interesting experience.

Also, on the subject of corporate-funded fanfiction in video games, the Super Robot Wars series is absolutely wonderful, probably because it's made by people who love giant robot shows.

I felt the same way about the new Sherlock Holmes movie to be honest. Just like Dante; Holmes, Watson and even Irene Adler were turned into something that fits the role of a modern protagonist while pretty much all the other aspect of the story were cast aside, which brought great sadness to old hardcore fans of the books. They wouldn't have done it 10 or 15 years ago. It would've been too soon after the death of a great Holmes actor Jeremy Brett and the finale of what is regarded the best Holmes television portrayal in decades (or ever).
Such a movie would've been inexcuseable at that time.

Scrumpmonkey:
There also tends towards fanservice and thereby fanfic ideas in many Japanses games and many of the Final Fantasy games. FF X-2 is a great example whereby Rikku was used almost purely for fanservice.

Rikku when't from this;
image

To this;

image

FanFic eat your heart out.

Also SHE'S FIFTEEN!. Yeah you feel bad now don't you.

Bad? No. Dirty? Definitely.

OT: I too was a little miffed at the way Dante's Inferno was co-opted into a God of War clone. Other than continuing to foster new ideas out in the wilds of the Internet and possibly other publications, I'm not sure what can be done to stem the tide of corporately-sponsored fan-wanking.

I actually don't mind if movie studies dick around with original content to make it fit into movie molds (It has to be done, one way or another), as long as they keep the SPIRIT of the original.

Spider-Man failed, Watchman failed, and Dante's Inferno was a spit in the face. I'm with the other guy: I would have been fine if it had been someone ELSE just going through Dante's version of hell. But making Dante into a more morally upright Kratos and having him chase his personal squeeze through hell is a joke.

Corporate fanfic: AKA, the so-called Prequel trilogy. Also, the Matrix sequels

as someone without a PS, looking for an action game, I was pleased with Dante's Inferno. sure, it doesn't follow the original, but then again a game based on the original wouldn't have been an action game, now would it?

I'm sorry, but I take a little offense to this article. Not for all the corporate BS that is constantly going on, but the fact that he refers to fanfiction as an 'obsession' like it's some kind of disease. Makes me feel like I have some sort of sickness or something.

I've been writing/reading/criticizing fanfiction for about five years now because I am passionate about it and I love the originals of which they are based on. Are some people obsessed? Yes. There's always a few, but to make a blanket statement like that feels wrong.

This article went in a completely different direction than I expected. When I think of the concept of "corporate fanfic" I'm thinking of things way, way, WAY more ubiquitous than the examples given. Sure, original films/series based on existing franchises count as fan fiction. No question there. But everyone pretty much knows that's the case. Here are some forms of professional fanfiction that maybe people aren't aware of.

Every TV drama you have ever watched, ever. In your life.
Because of the high turnaround in writers over even a single season:
Counts as Fanfiction.

Every sequel you have ever watched, ever.
Because they're rarely written by the original screenwriter:
Fanfiction.

Every comic of an established superhero you have ever read, ever, past the golden age.
Fanfiction.

Every Star Wars novel; every Star Trek novel; etc, ect, etc, and ect.
Fanfiction.

Every Dune sequel written by Frank Herbert's son; the final "Wheel of Time" novel.
Fanfiction.

Every original movie which, during preproduction, needed a new scriptwriter to come in and make major revisions.
Fanfiction.

Any original creation that employs the Cthulhu mythos. Sorry Stephen King. I like your work but:
Fanfiction.

Dante Alighieri's "The Divine Comedy"
Fanfiction.
OH SNAP! That's right I went there.

A better example of Corporate fanfiction would be the dirty harry series. At the end of Dirty harry, Harry. C, turn in his badge because he felt that the Police was too soft on crime.

...Then Magnum force came out, Recon the ending (With a superboy prime punch no less) and made Harry stayed on the job.

Scrumpmonkey:
I think some games newer ittorations decend into fanfic. Most recently Moder Warfare 2 felt like it had been written by a deranged fan of both the original modern warfare and every micheal Bay movie ever made.

I think the same was true for Bioshock 2, sure it was well crafted but the very idea of being a Big Daddy with a drill for an entire game was one i first heard and dissmissed in gushing fan forums.

There also tends towards fanservice and thereby fanfic ideas in many Japanses games and many of the Final Fantasy games. FF X-2 is a great example whereby Rikku was used almost purely for fanservice.

Rikku when't from this;
image

To this;

image

FanFic eat your heart out.

Also SHE'S FIFTEEN!. Yeah you feel bad now don't you.

I always thought she looked a little...out of place.

Meh, I kind of like it.

Speaking of Corporate Fanfic and comics, I'm surprised, in fact, even slightly shocked that neither the Ultimate or Marvel Zombies series got mentioned.

I will give the writers credit though with the Ultimate series. It takes a lot of work to tell new stories and mix things up without breaking making the series seem like a clone of the original with new artwork, but still making it at least slightly familiar.

I'm glad I'm not the only one who thought the psychic squid in Watchmen was weird. I always thought it was an obnoxious ending.

My main issue with the movie was that it stayed too faithful to the action in the main plot, without really explaining it (notice I say action and not dialog.) Since there are multiple layers of story going on in the original that add meaning to the main events, all the meaning in the movie was lost. This wouldn't have been as much of a problem if Snyder had, in a sense, made similar changes to the action in the entire story, not just the ending. By staying 'loyal' he made a shallow, boring movie that I would consider incomprehensible to anyone who hasn't read the comic book.

Don't get me wrong I really wanted to like the movie. But no, just no.

If you think just from watching the movie and reading the comic for Watchmen you know how BAD the 'fanfictionalization' of it is, don't do any looking into the backstory of the series.

They basically took a good piece of literature and boundary breaking art and design that was both in tribute and homage to several things in the comic book world inspired by beatuiful thinking behind controversial news of the day (Iran/Contra Hearings and Oliver North) and told a story that spanned generations in rich detail, and then got very talented people who theoretically could have done it service, and had them make a vague reference to it.

I am not a professional writer or director, but I honestly believe I could try and fail and do better.

If you have to see video, there is a 'motion comic' which takes the original art and animates it, and does a stripped down version with a talented audio book performer doing all the voices and it is 10x as good as the movie. They at least had the brains to leave most of the subtext in.

This is exactly why I can't bring myself to like comic books. When you've got a series of different people writing on a same character, development is extremely limited. Add to that decades' worth of baggage, a need to maintain the status quo, and a self-enforced, pointless decision to keep all of the works in a consistent universe, and I just can't get into mainstream American comics. I hate jumping on the bandwagon when it's moving, I wouldn't know where to start.

It's true that Superman and Batman, for example, came a long way since their beginnings, but I can't help thinking that if their stories didn't have to keep going on and on and on and on and on and on and on and on and on the people who worked on their best stories would have worked on different, but just as good stories. And of course there comes a time when you can't please the fans of Miller's gritty murderous Batman and the fans of West's jetpack-riding batarang-flinging Batman.

Regarding the Watchmen movie, I'd like to make a few commentaries.

1. I have no idea of what Moore says his comic does so awesomely that no other media can. Conceptually speaking, an animated series would convey more or less the same things. I can't find one technique he used (extreme zoom-in to extreme pan-outs, the symmetrical chapter, the multiple repeating symbols) that wouldn't work on, say, an animated series. (Realistically speaking, that one 'Watchmen Saturday morning cartoon' intro someone made is more like how it would be, I know, but I'm speaking strictly as a theory). I just looked at my comic book shelf and Watchmen lies right next to Promethea, another series by Moore that depends much more on panel styling and the comic's fourth wall. The movie had problems with adaptation because it's a movie, and there are lots of things that worked in Watchmen due to its serial nature - Rorschach's backstory works perfectly as a single isssue, but in a big thing is a huge drag right in the middle of the second act. Watchmen wouldn't be able to pull this off if it had come out as a single issue either.

2. My main problem with the movie was that it assumed I was completely dumb. Someone up there mentioned Rorschach's death, but there are a lot of other, smaller things. Like when Rorscharch walks into the bathroom to kill that one short criminal, the movie makes a point of showing him being all scared inside the bathroom as the door swings. Did they really think we wouldn't have figured out that bad guy walks into bathroom + murderous good guy walks into bathroom + blood seeps out of toilet as good guy walks out means what it means? There were other things, but I forget now.

3. What the fuck is up with the Nostalgia ad in the beginning making such a perfect reference to the ending if the ending was changed? I mean, seriously, folks.

Fists:
You know, I think someone who wrote a rather lengthy poem about learning to abstain from all sin, including those of passion such as furiously butchering things, would have had some problem with being portrayed doing just that.

Wow, I have to read that sometime. I didn't like that poem he wrote about how everyone that doesn't like him either is burning in hell or will burn in hell just as soon as they die.

(Yeah, OK, Paradise is more heavenly in its tone. Still.)

I'm a huge fan of the Watchmen book, and I thought the movie was pretty good. Thing is, I'd never need to watch it again, really, because I could just read the book and get a better experience. It's an okay companion to the book, but I agree with pretty much everything Elesar says. Just because of its medium, it could never be as subtle or as complex. It's still essentially the same great story, it's still very detailed and well done. It's just not as good, but it couldn't be. To give it some credit, the film probably captured some of the same feeling because it kind of commented on super hero movies in the same way that the book commented on super hero comics. There are a few other things I could fault (SuperChurl mentions a few) but they didn't bother me that much in the grand scheme of things.

Worst example of Corporate Fan Fiction? Hmmm. I know back in the late 90s I was a big Star Wars fan (and I'd still say I am) but I used to read some of the EU stuff and it was just awful. Some of the books were well written, but the vast majority of the stuff was so fanficy and so far removed from the actual feeling of the movies.

If you have a problem with corporate fan fiction then just go into fan amnesia, believe me it works wonders.

"What? There were no prequels! Jar Jar Binks was a bad dream."

"What? There are no sequels to Highlander!"

Grand_Marquis:
This article went in a completely different direction than I expected. When I think of the concept of "corporate fanfic" I'm thinking of things way, way, WAY more ubiquitous than the examples given. Sure, original films/series based on existing franchises count as fan fiction. No question there. But everyone pretty much knows that's the case. Here are some forms of professional fanfiction that maybe people aren't aware of.

Every TV drama you have ever watched, ever. In your life.
Because of the high turnaround in writers over even a single season:
Counts as Fanfiction.

Every sequel you have ever watched, ever.
Because they're rarely written by the original screenwriter:
Fanfiction.

Every comic of an established superhero you have ever read, ever, past the golden age.
Fanfiction.

Every Star Wars novel; every Star Trek novel; etc, ect, etc, and ect.
Fanfiction.

Every Dune sequel written by Frank Herbert's son; the final "Wheel of Time" novel.
Fanfiction.

Every original movie which, during preproduction, needed a new scriptwriter to come in and make major revisions.
Fanfiction.

Any original creation that employs the Cthulhu mythos. Sorry Stephen King. I like your work but:
Fanfiction.

Dante Alighieri's "The Divine Comedy"
Fanfiction.
OH SNAP! That's right I went there.

I think this post illustrates pretty well how the writer of this article kind of missed the point of what he was talking about.

Pretty much every comic written by Grant Morrison or Mark Waid or Geoff Johns is authorized corporate fanfiction of characters they loved from silver age comics and some of their stuff is acknowledged as some of the best comics ever written about those characters.
Ask anyone who's read Timothy Zahn's Heir to the Empire Trilogy that was a NYT bestseller if they liked it and a lot of them might say it's better than any of the movies.
After the 1st season, Star Trek TNG was pretty much entirely a corporate fanfiction of Rodenberry's ideas.

So let's keep this in perspective, this dark and cynical view that this article advocates is not necessarily the correct one.

Grand_Marquis:
This article went in a completely different direction than I expected. When I think of the concept of "corporate fanfic" I'm thinking of things way, way, WAY more ubiquitous than the examples given. Sure, original films/series based on existing franchises count as fan fiction. No question there. But everyone pretty much knows that's the case. Here are some forms of professional fanfiction that maybe people aren't aware of.

Every TV drama you have ever watched, ever. In your life.
Because of the high turnaround in writers over even a single season:
Counts as Fanfiction.

Every sequel you have ever watched, ever.
Because they're rarely written by the original screenwriter:
Fanfiction.

Every comic of an established superhero you have ever read, ever, past the golden age.
Fanfiction.

Every Star Wars novel; every Star Trek novel; etc, ect, etc, and ect.
Fanfiction.

Every Dune sequel written by Frank Herbert's son; the final "Wheel of Time" novel.
Fanfiction.

Every original movie which, during preproduction, needed a new scriptwriter to come in and make major revisions.
Fanfiction.

Any original creation that employs the Cthulhu mythos. Sorry Stephen King. I like your work but:
Fanfiction.

Dante Alighieri's "The Divine Comedy"
Fanfiction.
OH SNAP! That's right I went there.

Applaud this man! Applaud him! Stand up and give him a damn standing ovation, because he has summed up all visual media of the last twenty years brilliantly and with almost Carlin/Hicks-like brilliance!

when a character(s) is created it generates a certain fanbase. After an extended period of time the character has such a long history that it becomes very inaccessable to any new fans. This means you are only loosing fans and revenue as time goes on.

The only options for the owners of these characters are to either change them to appeal to a larger audience or to let them die away.

There are many characters that I feel should have just died away over the years, but I can't blame a corperation for wanting to keep them alive at all costs.

if movie makers have the balls to make a BOARDGAME movie.... I would expect that this article will someday become one too.

Sinbeans:
I'm glad I'm not the only one who thought the psychic squid in Watchmen was weird. I always thought it was an obnoxious ending.

The way it sounds here (I've never read the comics, I haven't seen the movie) is that the author was too busy giving a 'screw you!' to his copyright holders (who would be the ones to authorise any such spin-off) and the industry than resolving his story arc with finesse and good writing.

Is that true?

Aha, this is why I love the movie adaptation to The Princess Bride. The author of the book was also the screenplay writer! Yesss.
Seriously, if anyone else had written the screenplay, I would be pissed at the amount of stuff they left out. But William Goldman made the concessions himself, so it's all good.

Formica Archonis:
Was wondering if the first post would be horror over Dante's Inferno or horror over a Monopoly movie. And I thought when Robot Chicken turned the Hungry Hungry Hippos into a cop movie ("Hungry... FOR JUSTICE!") it was a joke.

They did a few boardgame movie skits, funny thing is if anyone did go ahead and make movies off those games would Robot Chicken then do a spoof of the movie based off the game based off the skit they did?

Do you think Watchmen the movie is a bad adaption? I'm really surprised to see many may think so, because it was an adaption as good as it could ever be.

The way it sounds here (I've never read the comics, I haven't seen the movie) is that the author was too busy giving a 'screw you!' to his copyright holders (who would be the ones to authorise any such spin-off) and the industry than resolving his story arc with finesse and good writing.

Is that true?

No.

If you haven't read Watchmen, and you don't wish to be spoiled, stop reading this post in 3... 2... 1...

Still here?

[Spoilers]

It's unfortunate that the author has this impression that the ending is "bad" and that it is bad on purpose. Or has conveyed this impression, at least.

Alan Moore was staying true to the dimensions of several comic book traditions. His alien monster was straight out of an E. C. Science Fiction comic (much as the Black Freighter was straight out of an E.C. Horror Comic).

By the way, even the fact that the alien monster was a fake alien monster designed to trick humanity out of its differences fits in with E. C. comics. (E. C. Comics stories were very similar to the Twilight Zone after all, and the fake alien is straight out of the Outer Limits episode "The Architects of Fear" while its looks are straight off the cover of E. C.'s Weird Science.)

In other words, he did it on purpose, he wasn't trying to be obnoxious. If you didn't like it, well, different strokes for different folks as they say. It was however supposed to be a comic-book villains comic-book villainous plot. (I mean, why object to that and not his antarctic fortress or genetically engineered super lynx, Bubastis? It strikes me as a dangerous game Mr. Snyder plays, this is "cheesy" and this is not. You have a guy dressing in an Owl suit, right? That's in the movie, correct?)

(The alien was also to some extent a MacGuffin, the real ending was the conflicting morality between Rorschach and Ozymandias.)

Another important fact, Alan Moore shares copyright with D. C.

It wasn't work for hire, he has signed contracts and everything. It was his misfortune that he didn't realize that D. C. was going to keep the miniseries in print forever, because if Watchmen ever does go out of print the rights to it revert to him. However, at the time he was writing it, he believed he was going to own those characters and the whole book eventually, so he had no need to sabotage his own property.

As much as anything else, Watchmen is a comic book about comic books and about comic books in the context of American society. Therefore, when he does a deliberate nod to a particular comic book, don't assume he's doing it to "be stupid."

He was also writing with a purpose. He missed the old days, when there was more to comics than men and women in capes and masks. He hoped to revive some of the broader themes that had been popular in comics before the CCA crackdown left us mostly with capes and masks, and was looking at them in his book. I'd say he somewhat succeeded, but he did always feel bad that he also influenced the brooding sociopathic anti-heros who have dominated comics since the success of Watchmen.)

The main problem i had with the Watchmen movie was the way they OVERSTATED everything, from the sex scenes to the sound track to the gore and the blue wang compared to the subtleties of the comic.

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