The Girl With a Sensitive Heart

 Pages 1 2 NEXT
 

The Girl With a Sensitive Heart

There lies a surprisingly emotional experience underneath all of the mindless violence in Call of Duty.

Read Full Article

It's funny as before I read this article I hadn't given this much thought, but, you're right COD's storyline is emotive and engaging. Another game that NEEDS to be mentioned is Battlefield Bad Company 2; it may take itself less seriously, but the sounds in it make you duck when shells and flak are ripping the terrain apart all around you, Also I think the storyline in BFBC2 is more engaging than COD's.

Just my 2 penneth :)

You guys realise that the wars depicted in modern warfare 1 and 2 are nothing like the wars going on in iraq and afghanistan right now? many soldiers never see battle, including myself

Morty815:
You guys realise that the wars depicted in modern warfare 1 and 2 are nothing like the wars going on in iraq and afghanistan right now? many soldiers never see battle, including myself

Heres hoping no one sees the nuke from COD4. It left me speachless the first time I saw that.

With the MW games, they've sort of missed out on that though - yeah, the end to 4 is sad, but the first 2 had a real heart to them.

There was an article on Eurogamer a few months back that summed the series up by saying that, although MW2 is the best-selling game of all time, the series had the potential to be something greater.

MW2 completly missed that emotional thrillride. MW1 brought that back, there was even an article going on called "The Meaning of Modern Warfare". It precisily nails down what she is talking about.

For so much 'mindless' violence, some games provoke emotional responses and make people THINK about certain matters. If that's achieved, game devolepers done their jobbs.

bjj hero:

Morty815:
You guys realise that the wars depicted in modern warfare 1 and 2 are nothing like the wars going on in iraq and afghanistan right now? many soldiers never see battle, including myself

Heres hoping no one sees the nuke from COD4. It left me speachless the first time I saw that.

Yeah...that was mindblowing. I've felt this way about games for a long while though and it just strengthens my opinion about games not being bad, people are.

When you play a game like CoD you can walk away with an experience and thoughts about how it must have been for those poor souls (germans and americans/brits/whatever). It can give you more empathy, it can make you more opposed to war and violence.

Others will only be "inspired" by the violence. Maybe they carry too much hatred with them...and some might be inspired to inflict violence themselves. But this is not the games fault...the game offers an experience, its our past experiences and personality that decides what we take away from it.

Yeah, but the thing is most shooters o violent games go for the same emotions, tension, fear, sense of danger.
The reason most reviewers are hard on games like these is because it's been done so many times over that one would think there aren't any more emotions capaple to engage you in a game.

And the thing gets kinda overly abused and dull over 6 iterations of the same old emotion buttons being pushed. It was necesary for games to get popular, the thrill rides are among the most popular emotions people are almost always ready and eager to experiment, but it's about time we move on from the crib.

I'm sorry, but COD stopped being emotional for the MW games. That war never happened, and never will. Theres no strong sense of emotion for those characters as they could never exist. The MW games were horrible. All the WW2 COD games were emotional because, think back, everyone knew someone in that war, everyone has some connection to it, be it axis or ally. Those battles were real, those computers (not the same people obviously) probably had people do the same thing. They stormed normandy beach and others, many died before hitting the dunes.

MW 1 and 2 has no real connection to reality other then the guns. Theres no russian civil war. Theres no guy missing an arm about to launch a nuke. Nothing. No tie to emotion or reality.

Now, if CoD really wanted to hit emotion, they would put in a concentration camp in a russian campaign and a japanease POW camp

I remember when the Nuke first went off in Modern Warfare. The PS3 was down in the living room and a bunch of my family members were at the dinner table, when me and my cousin decided to continue the campaign. Suddenly, as we were flying away from what we had thought was a hard-earned victory, warning sirens blazed and the mushroom cloud rose.

Everyone at the table stopped talking and watched the screen, even my older relatives who couldn't stand the 'doo-hickeys of this generation'. It was a powerful moment.

Modern Warfare 2, when Washington D.C. was attacked, brought tears to my eyes. I looked around at all the destroyed monuments and was afraid something like this could happen in the real world. It gave me chills.

The strange thing about war games is, do they provide the experience that many young men who signed up during ww2 thought they would get ? Before Vietnam (any maybe afterwards) there was a great amount of machismo about signing up and doing your part and the big adventure, but nobody realised the slaughter it actually was until they were there. The games give the experience without the reality of it.

WW2 CoD games make me wanna hug a vet.

Ummm is it just me or was she talking about COD 2 not MW2. Everyone has related this specific review to the second game... which shouldn't be allowed.

The first 3 COD games are a huge farcry from the ones that came after, WaW was still completely different and it happened in the same time period. In a battle the emotion was more prevalent in the first 3 games while after it was more in what the missions was, kinda like the overall expierence. Stopping terrorists from blowing a nuke, an attack on an airport, and the sniper missions.

The first CoD put you in impossible situations that seemed grittier... because in most people's opinion WW2 was a lot more "grity" and "real"(because a lot of it actually happened minus taking a german installments in less then five minutes).

I'm assuming most of the people up their haven't played the first few games which is sad and the style for the most part seems unrelatable to me; besides the fact that infinity ward took the genre in a new direction when they realized they where falling into mediocrity.

I feel much the same about most of the "gritty and realistic" games I've played. At least until I became disconnected enough to play it mindlessly. I cringed every time I shot someone in GTA IV until about 20 hours in. The physics of it still kinda sicken me. Fallout 3 and Half-Life 2 had me making sure my followers were alright before continuing, prompting me to load previous games if they had been killed (still do). The whole Call of Duty series seems to me to be anti-war games far more than "war is fun" games. Many people, sadly, do not see it the same way.

I just don't like war games too much for this exact reason.

The realism is nice, but it almost feels like we're mocking the wars considering some of these games are based on true stories.

Also, i'm just not a guy who can kill left and right.

This is the reason why the Fallujah game will never be released.

Game People:
The Girl With a Sensitive Heart

There lies a surprisingly emotional experience underneath all of the mindless violence in Call of Duty.

Read Full Article

Play any Brothers in Arms game. Now THAT can be emotionally draining. Especially in Hell's Highway, when Baker hallucinates about his fallen squadmembers.

I have always had a hard time playing the call of duty(and most war games for that matter) series simply because of all my grandpa's stories of WWII.

I've always been very in tune and empathetic with people's emotions, so a lot of the realism of it really weighed heavily on my mind. I just strait out avoid war games, and a lot of FPS games for that matter.

SomeUnregPunk:
This is the reason why the Fallujah game will never be released.

I certainly hope it does get released, though, precisely for that reason! Games cannot become a serious medium if they cannot engage in serious issues.

Anyway, I can understand the author completely. One of the most emotional experiences for me also comes from the Call of Duty series, specifically the original Call of Duty.
I was playing the Pegasus Bridge mission on Veteran and I had very little health remaining with no med packs available. So my character (Evans, I believe he was) was lying on the ground, avoiding grenades as best as possible and carefully shooting with a Lee-Einfeld, since a missed shot meant instant death.

As I played this, I thought how the soldiers must have felt in such a situation. Cold and scared, hugging the ground for dear life, attacked from all sides and with seemingly no hope of ever seeing their home and loved ones ever again. The music that was playing during this part only further enforced such an atmosphere. It was the only time that I recall that a game brought tears into my eyes and I replayed the original Call of Duty at least dozens of times.

Another moment that will always be burned into my skull was the infamous post-nuke scene from Call of Duty 4: Modern Warfare, where Jackson dragged himself out of the crashed helicopter into the nuclear wasteland outside. You watched through his eyes as you pondered whether there is any hope for him to survive. Then, he helplessly falls on the ground and passes away, unmourned and unloved, thousands of miles away from home. What makes his death even more ironic is that he died trying to save a fellow soldier, who ended up dying in the nuclear explosion along with him anyway. A thouroughly shocking scene in general that will always be remembered in gaming history.

Overall, a game does not have to be storyline oriented to invoke an emotional response. However, in the case of the Call of Duty, a realistic setting helps a lot in immersing the player and thus making it easier to invoke such a response.

Saphatorael:

Game People:
The Girl With a Sensitive Heart

There lies a surprisingly emotional experience underneath all of the mindless violence in Call of Duty.

Read Full Article

Play any Brothers in Arms game. Now THAT can be emotionally draining. Especially in Hell's Highway, when Baker hallucinates about his fallen squadmembers.

Darn it, it appears that you have ninja'd what I was going to say. Though I always thought that Cpl/Sgt Joe Hartsock

and poor Sgt Baker had to tell him the bad news.

This scene really packed a punch for me especially as I had the good fortune to have played BiB: Earned in Blood which really focused Joe's side of the story.

This only applies to Call of Duty 2, the best of the series, by a mile. Or perhaps the first one as well. They have a lot more to them than just "lookima snipa, pwnin u n0bz". Heavy influences from "enemy at the gates" made CoD 1 quite a shocker (good luck with those 5 cartridges, comrade!). And defending hill 400 in CoD 2 was thrilling, especially after I met US rangers WW2 veterans in 2003.

MattLepore:
I remember when the Nuke first went off in Modern Warfare. The PS3 was down in the living room and a bunch of my family members were at the dinner table, when me and my cousin decided to continue the campaign. Suddenly, as we were flying away from what we had thought was a hard-earned victory, warning sirens blazed and the mushroom cloud rose.

Everyone at the table stopped talking and watched the screen, even my older relatives who couldn't stand the 'doo-hickeys of this generation'. It was a powerful moment.

Modern Warfare 2, when Washington D.C. was attacked, brought tears to my eyes. I looked around at all the destroyed monuments and was afraid something like this could happen in the real world. It gave me chills.

even if I hated MW2's gameplay or story, I would still have to admit it really had the atmosphere and just seeing the events was pretty damn awesome
honestly, I only began to feel much from the "story" in Call of Duty 2 my second play through because I began to read the written text (soldiers' letters) after dying so much on Veteran...but I wouldn't call it an emotional (however, WWII being a real war does give it some extra oomph, not saying it doesn't)

I can somewhat see the points. If you think about whats going on, and the whole set of actions been taken it could be quote emotional, if, at least on a "I dont want my home to burn" kind of level.

But, as an over-aching story of tragedy, and what not...Its...a little lack-luster

Morty815:
You guys realise that the wars depicted in modern warfare 1 and 2 are nothing like the wars going on in iraq and afghanistan right now? many soldiers never see battle, including myself

Fear not! There's a new Modern Warfare being made that will satisfy you 120% with its accuracy: http://www.theonion.com/video/ultrarealistic-modern-warfare-game-features-awaiti,14382/

War can be a powerful thing, it always has been, this shouldn't surprise anyone.

For all the grit, and horror of war, there is also a lot of beauty (of a sort) and glory. There are two sides fo the equasion, and capturing that perfectly can be hard to do. Most things get caught up in either one or the other, depending on the political agenda of the person creating the game/telling the story.

I think the problem with World War II games and why I think many people don't notice the depth of the entire experience so much is because it's slowly losing cultural relevence. Sort of like what happened with Westerns I guess, there was a point where things like "The Shootout At The OK Corral" was a big deal. It seemed like it sort of mattered for a long time, but then eventually it just lost the same kind of impact.

Consider World War II was over 50 years ago. Most of the people in power now are Baby Boomers with anti-war issues coming from Veitnam and such. To them and the way they are raising their children, things like World War II are sort of an inconveinence. What's more we've got a current, long-running war going on right now, with a ton of it's own issues to worry about. Right now you've got people who consider it their highest priority to promote "peace at any price" and get us out of there. You've also got people (like me) who are extremely militant and who are out to ensure the removal of threats to the US at any price... and the conflict between them.

A lot of people just see World War II as a "politically acceptable" arena to shoot people in and miss the entire subtext. It continues mostly because more current theaters are more or less taboo unless they are made so fantastic as to be ridiculous.

Gunner 51:

Darn it, it appears that you have ninja'd what I was going to say. Though I always thought that Cpl/Sgt Joe Hartsock

and poor Sgt Baker had to tell him the bad news.

This scene really packed a punch for me especially as I had the good fortune to have played BiB: Earned in Blood which really focused Joe's side of the story.

Yeah, that scene had me crying, le sigh.

I played the games on PC first, recently I bought it for PS3 (to replay it at home on a huge tv screen, found it pretty cheap), and seeing the intro movie, it had me all teary again.

I quit EiB 2/3 into the game, I really should play through that one completely... him losing his finger was already a "oh, shit." moment, but still nothing compared to

The saddest part of this all is, Red is the lucky one.

Call of Duty is indeed an emotional experience, I especially recall the times when the officers that command the player, who are completely immune to enemy fire, mow down a batallion of german soldiers all by themselves.

Good article, brought back many memories of the game. Which is kind of appropriate as I continue to get flashbacks from Call of Duty 2. What sticks in my mind particularly is scrambling up the banks of the Volga with nothing more than a clip of 7.62mm as fellow conscripts fall all around me under the continuous hail of fascist machine guns... I don't wish to denigrate the emotional trauma suffered by actual combatants over the centuries, but sounds and sights approximating the early Call of Duty games still fill me with anxiety.

Medal of Honour: Pacific Assault explicitly played upon this tendency. On the main menu (a 3D tableau of a barracks tent that changed appearance throughout the campaign) included a crate of souvenirs - a partially burned naval officer's cap, a truck's hood ornament, etc - earned from accomplishing specially heroic acts. Selecting one of these souvenirs would play a melange of sounds and shouts from the scene it came from, so letting the player experience a measure of the excitement all over again.

Morty815:
You guys realise that the wars depicted in modern warfare 1 and 2 are nothing like the wars going on in iraq and afghanistan right now? many soldiers never see battle, including myself

It's taling about COD 2.

Set in WW2.
Real battles.
SOldiers based on reality.
Hugley emotional.

Game People:
The Girl With a Sensitive Heart

There lies a surprisingly emotional experience underneath all of the mindless violence in Call of Duty.

Read Full Article

I know what you mean man. I love CoD2, it think it's the best WW2 shooter now and probably forever. However, it is much more interesting when playing with the Germans PoV mod. (well, called the SP CoD2 Axisplayer mod).

You get to experience a side of the war that's almost never told. Just think, if you signed up to the German army pre-1939, unaware of what kind of daemonic lunatic would be in charge, and then when Hitler did come into power, you had to take an oath of allegence, even though you didn't agree with him. Imagine fighting a war you didn't really want to win, but fighting anyway because you had to, because you'd be shot otherwise, and then who would look after your family then?

Imagine knowing you were on the losing side, and still fighting? Imagine gunning down people who you knew were actually fighting for a just and noble cause, not to simply conquer and help commit genocide (SS did that, not the Wehrmacht though, lets clear that up). It would be terrible, and a much more complex and interesting story than the same old, tired "play as the US kicking nazi's in the face" WW2 storyline we get repeatidly rammed down our throats.

I think that's a story rarely told, and without good reason. Men and women died on both sides of the conflict, and most of the time it wasn't always clear-cut good vs evil. The german army consisted of regualr soldiers, people, just like any other army, and they should'nt be demonised the way they are in WW2 games.

Anyway, sorry for the rant, but i believe strongly in this. We need a WW2 game with a storyline told from a german's point of view, to show that ultimately they were human beings, not just objects to be shot at in the name of saving the world!

Ldude893:
First of all: FIRST

really? Like Really?

OT: I thought it would be about a girl who cried when she played online and people were dicks. I don't find the Story in CoD games that good. It doesn't enthrall me at all when i have played them on rare occasion.

UtopiaV1:

I think that's a story rarely told, and without good reason. Men and women died on both sides of the conflict, and most of the time it wasn't always clear-cut good vs evil. The german army consisted of regualr soldiers, people, just like any other army, and they should'nt be demonised the way they are in WW2 games.

Anyway, sorry for the rant, but i believe strongly in this. We need a WW2 game with a storyline told from a german's point of view, to show that ultimately they were human beings, not just objects to be shot at in the name of saving the world!

Precisely, it annoys me that everyone was saying how gritty and realistic Saving Private Ryan was when it came out but it wasn't. The American soldiers were traumatised, suffered and showed grief. The German soldiers didn't seem to give a crap even when the guy next to them was shot. World War 2 wasn't black and white, especially if you happen to know a little pre-war history.

Go play brothers in arms: hell's highway kthanxbai.

Oh damn. Ninja'd.

 Pages 1 2 NEXT

Reply to Thread

Log in or Register to Comment
Have an account? Login below:
With Facebook:Login With Facebook
or
Username:  
Password:  
  
Not registered? To sign up for an account with The Escapist:
Register With Facebook
Register With Facebook
or
Register for a free account here