What Grade is Your Content Comprehension?

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What Grade is Your Content Comprehension?

If you're comprehending this, you may just be a snob.

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Good job I'm not comprehending anything so far then. :D

404 here as well.

And now for my actual comment on the piece:

This was a interesting read and it actually comes in handy in a discussion I'm currently having with a friend about the dumbing down of media. Now I have some ammunition for that.

I think I'll have to own up to being a snob, if that is the right word. I much prefer a text to be subtle, intricate and eloquently written compared to easy understandable. For me, it's all about the aesthetics of language. Having studied philology (Greek and Latin in this case) I've grown to love language as both a tool and as an art form.
While I'm not terribly well-spoken myself, even less so in English, I do appreciate when an author writes well.

The piece mentions Edward Gibbons The History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire, a book that stands within arms reach of the very chair I'm in, though sadly in an abridged form. I love that book, not only for being a seminal work in my field (history) but also for it's elegant prose. The value of the book as a historical account may have diminished over the years as research and thinking moved on, but it still holds as a work of art when language is the focus. At least that's my view of it.

To illustrate I have cherry picked a quite famous passage from the books:

"If a man were called to fix the period in the history of the world, during which the condition of the human race was most happy and prosperous, he would, without hesitation, name that which elapsed from the death of Domitian to the accession of Commodus."

That to my mind, while being rather silly as history, and here I mean history as we tend to write it now, is a very elegant passage. Granted, I could make the same point in fewer words but in the process it would lose some of the poignancy of Gibbons.

I enjoy it a lot more than a more simple text to put it bluntly. That's also the reason I almost never watch TV any more and mostly read a few newspapers with an intellectual bend. If I read the news I might as well enjoy it all the while.

To shift the focus somewhat I want to address the points made about snobs, be they literate, musical or cinematic. I think your explanation goes a long way to explain why some people would call me an elitist. I tend not to want anything but the best possible experience. That's why I read a book like Gibbons, listen to the music I do, get bored by Hollywood and play my games on a PC. Running the risk of insulting a great many people I will submit that a lot of the "anti-elitism" stems from some people simply not wanting to put in the work needed to get those experiences and therefore try their best to make it seem like those that do are not in fact anything but snobs. A sort of defence mechanism.

I should note that I don't care whether people enjoy the same things I do, nor do I consider them in any way inferior. I do mind though, that some people constantly try to drag others "down", as if there was an inherent problem in enjoying different things and considering the ones you enjoy yourself better.

There was a further point I wanted to talk about but it eludes me at the moment. I'll edit it in if I remember what it was.

Aha! Now I remember it. Thank you, later posters for reminding me. I wanted to say that all that being said, I still enjoy a good fart joke as much as the next guy.

14th level codpiece. That's what makes the difference.

But... what if I'm a toilet humor snob?

Is there even such a thing as a 14th level poop joke?

I comprehend, but I doubt I'm a snob =/

That said, the English language is not what I grew up with, so a great many words, that I'm sure most find common knowledge, I cannot understand. However, I do enjoy experimental rock... And I do not enjoy American Idol Oo. Hmmmmm...

""Rules, in a tabletop RPG, are ultimately about what philosophers call action, where 'action' means intentional effects caused by an agent. It is the rules that dictate the results of action, and thus define the relationship between a player's choices and the consequence he experiences"!"

I had to read that about four times to understand what the hell you were on about. Essentially all you are saying is that rules dictate how the choices which the players make will effect the game, covered over with several layers of jargon. It just seems like you were using a higher "grade" then necessary to convey your point.

You ask us what level we prefer. I would say that you should use whatever level you need to in order to get your point across in full. Anything more than that is just raising the entry barrier - keeping people out - for no reason.

Also, you're totally right. ZP is funny on many levels.

Huh, interesting to think about. We don't have that system here in Ireland (as far as I know) but I just went over two essays I've done for English, and I got level 16-17, so I might be off :p

It's weird to think that in order to appeal to the masses, they simplified something that is so important - the news. Why would people not want to know what was happening across the world?

Huh, I've read Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire and I understood it. I also haven't finished college yet, so that index is wrong.

Or I'm reeeaaaalllllyyy smart. One of those two.

And yes, Yahtzee is a big literary fag. And I appreciate that because I am a literary fag too. So of course his ZP bits are entertaining, especially to those who get all his jokes and aren't laughing because the british man is talking funny.

well, my reading level has been tested at around 20.7, so very little goes over my head when it comes to comprehension. doesn't mean i don't enjoy some of the lower-level stuff. sometimes i just don't feel like thinking that hard, which is something i don't think your researchers take into account.

also, ZP owns at smart and dumb humor!

I actually swing the other way at times, despite being a card carrying fan of Stephen Fry and the like.

I have a friend who used to use 'conflagration' when 'fire' would have worked, (lucky he never never got trapped in one, yelling 'conflagration' isn't going to get people running for help) and while he's a smart guy, just didn't seem to have the ability to scale things down to be acessible to 'normal' people. On another occasion, he was having a housewarming get together, and a girl broke into a conversation about music with 'what IS mp3 anyway?', to which he breaks down the acronym, starts talking about lossy codecs and the like, and the history of the format, at which point someone fortunately distracted him and I was able to step in and say 'um, its just music, but stored as a computer file instead of on a cd.'

Sure, he was being more informative, and more factual, but sometimes ya need to read between the lines and realise that sometimes a question is more than a desire for information. It can simply be a 'hi, can I join this group's conversation please?' and a ten minute lecture on digital encoding formats might make her change her mind pretty quickly!

I should state he has vastly improved over the past few years, in case he ever reads this :D

I think it's a common problem among techy/science types, that they spend a lot of time around their own kind, and forget that most people just don't live in that world, and why I wish more tech support depts would try hiring people who don't just know a lot about hardware, but are capable of talking about 'stuff' to regular people.

Off-topic: Has anyone else noticed that Archon has posted this from the future?

Hurr Durr Derp:
But... what if I'm a toilet humor snob?

Is there even such a thing as a 14th level poop joke?

You mean like a humorous anecdote of an incedent involving fecal matter or excrements?

OT:
I guess the way the article tells about the language of newspapers of the old days is why, i can't help but think of people wearing an old school shirt and vest, with a top-hat and monocle to booth, when people (usually on internet forums) starts using higher level writing (or just replacing words with rarely used synonyms) to sound smarter when they lack a point or a counter-argument.
Just repeat what you just said in fancy old school smartsounding language, cause that'll surely make your point more clear, like the intelelgence version of a brute flexing his muscles while trying to sound intimmidating to make his previously stupid point bear more weight by pointign out, that his bigegr and stronger than you.

As for games, i guess it really depends on how much i like the game, for most single player games, i don't really acre to understand how every mechanic works, especially in RPG's where theres a whole lot of math-craft and web-browsing to do, if you want do truly understand how each stat affects you, when they cap etc.
In compettitive games i'll go way furtehr than i'd ever do in a single-player game to figure out how stuff works, if theres a reason for it.
This may of course be due to the fact, that i rarely play single player games through more than once, while multiplayer games gets hundreds of hours of play-time.

As for movies and books, i usually prefer the non-snobbish ones, i got too sick of over-analizing and intepretating books in high school, and i've always been more intrigued with impressive world and stories that can depict those worlds through their tale than the underlying subliminal messages which may or may not be something the writer intended.
For insatnce, thats why i really liked avatar, while teh story itself may not have been teh greatest ever, teh movie managed to depict a world which goes beyond the movie... that and me beeing a 3d digital artist in training, i am a sucker for CGI.

Given the average post in a ZP Comments thread, I'd say 4th grade is quite a charitable description.

SenseOfTumour:
I actually swing the other way at times, despite being a card carrying fan of Stephen Fry and the like

tee-hee

I like content that appeals to a variety of people, because I think our hobby appeals to a variety of people.

For example: My sister and I watch ZP together. She is a casual gamer with six years of college education under her belt, while I am more of a hardcore gamer, with a high school education. Sure she understands more of the higher level jokes than I do, but we both find it just as funny. She explains the words I don't understand, and I give her a brief overview of the game before we watch it. It has also sparked her interest in my hobby. She was absolutely absorbed by Mass Effect, and has recently expressed her wish to play Bioshock.

Of course, ZP first drew me in with the potty humor, I won't lie about that. I would enjoy it without the intellectual bits, but I don't think I would be gleefully anticipating it every Wednesday, as I do now. The 14th level comprehension is what makes Yatzhee stand out, and I think it shows that gaming can be intelligent too. At least it did for my sister.

Cousin_IT:
Given the average post in a ZP Comments thread, I'd say 4th grade is quite a charitable description.

SenseOfTumour:
I actually swing the other way at times, despite being a card carrying fan of Stephen Fry and the like

tee-hee

heh, considering Fry's innuendo packed style of humour, I can't believe I didn't spot myself writing that!

Really tho, when it comes to entertainment, most people don't want to WORK at it, so you'll drop down a few ranks on that scale. Which explains Hole in the Wall, Total Wipeout and Britains Got Talent, even retarded chimps are finding those shows 'a bit dumb but enjoyable enough'.

EDIT Reading this, it sounds a bit anti 'dumb fun', I'm not, I'm all for it, so long as it's not the only thing you're enjoying, just like a man can not live on rockstar and cheetos alone, even if it is the big raid tonight :D

Personally I can find enjoyment in Serious Sam and Deus Ex, despite them being very different in terms of what I get from them, sometimes just plain blowing stuff up is fun.

I'm a bit of a music snob. Literary, not so much. I'd rather read a good vampire story than read the story of the War of 1812 in 1000 pages.

SenseOfTumour:
I think it's a common problem among techy/science types, that they spend a lot of time around their own kind, and forget that most people just don't live in that world, and why I wish more tech support depts would try hiring people who don't just know a lot about hardware, but are capable of talking about 'stuff' to regular people.

We've a number of those people where I work. They've never solved anyone's problem.

There's a secondary issue here: People want simplification/abstraction, while failing to understand that it often muddles the issue.

If I tell you that there's a fire "over on that street with the good restaurant," that's just about worthless. In order to resolve the issue, the fire, you need a much more precise location. Same goes for technical problems: Telling me that your printer doesn't work is worthless. I need to know exactly what it isn't doing.

I'm a snob in many ways. I'm always looking for something new and different and the mainstream music, games, and everything else just don't cut it.

I find Zero Punctuation works on many levels. At its base, it is base humor: childish, sexual, and made to get laughs (not gay). But at a higher level, Yahtzee is able to weave a larger narrative, describing his experiences and critically reviewing the material within the games in the greater context of gaming. What makes it truly masterful is that he is able to distract you with sexual jokes long enough to trick you into honestly considering the ridiculousness of some of the things we experience in games. As an example, driving around town having to find a dozen locations where a specific marker stood is deplorable, but not funny. However, when it's Satan's willy that you're searching for, standing erect in the middle of a park, that shit is bangin'.

Another great example of works that can be enjoyed at multiple levels are the Disney/Pixar films like Shrek. Kids will think the potty humor is funny and will enjoy seeing the animals dancing and singing, but parents can easily understand the not-so-subtle references to sex and relationships that go right over the youngster's heads. The beautiful part is, they can make adult jokes without the kids going, "Mommy, what's a cock?"

I think this is an important point to consider in the continual argument over games as kids' toys. Just like movies can have adult versions, and even adult content within a film intended for children, video games should also be able to leave something for the adults to enjoy.

It also makes a great argument against those incessant, forced "Move the stick to look around" intro tutorials. If you have never played a video game before, or were too lazy to read the manual (do they even make those any more), it would be understandable, but most adults (and even most kids) playing GTA IV for the first time have likely played another first-person shooter / RPG / gore porn that they would know how to control it. By relegating all of the content to the 4th grade level, they are alienating their larger, more age-appropriate audience.

Exellent that music was mentioned, good music makes me feel like you know as if I'm in a mills and boons novel.

and and and!

So I apologize if my writing makes no sense to those of you who only made it to 14th. Perhaps you might enjoy some writing about games at the 4th grade level?

I'm so glad for that, so there is a scientific way of me telling people that Kotaku have a shit writing style.

and the over 2000 romance novels sold annually for $1.63 billion are written at the 5th grade level.

And then he stuck it in her, and it was totally hot and then "take me" she said and he got on a Harley and rode into the sunset.

Archon:
[...]To be a snob is to be a consumer only willing to consume content created at a high comprehension level.

I'm going to contest this. By your very own definition I would seemingly be a snob. I'm easily able to read and interpret everything you wrote, and in fact regularly read scientific articles for college. I love Bach, Pachelbel, Mozart, Carl Maria von Weber, and many more themed "classical" artists. Yet I'm not entirely restricted to those things.

Yes, I prefer listening to a good interpretation of Der Freischütz, or Steve Vai's brilliant "For the love of god" more than most pop, yet my music folder also holds some Lady Gaga or Eminem. I enjoy a psychological and cinematographic masterpieces like 12 Angry Men or Revolver (absurdly underrated gem), yet I also have room in my heart for some stupid-as-plywood balls-out action killfests like Ninja Assassin. I absolutely adored Portal's story, level design, characterization... And everything really... But I spent more than a few hours of my life on "stupid" games like Tekken or Dead or Alive. Several volumes of Kohta Hirano's Hellsing line up on my shelf next to a Kafka, and right before Watchmen, V for Vendetta and The Killing Joke.

At the risk of sounding like a snob (or a prick), I'll admit I seem to have higher standards than most people, but I don't subscribe to the idea that just because I like what you'd consider "higher comprehension level" media, that I'm limited to it.

Partially because I don't believe something requires a high comprehension level to be good, in fact I wildly praise Alan Moore for his capacity to deliver deep and brilliantly pungent messages and ideas through what you described as "7th grade comprehension level", while many artists try to hide the shallowness of their content through inflation of their "comprehension level". Partially, because I think a good and well though out message should be appreciated by everyone. I shudder to think people would consider themselves educated while being unable to appreciate simple things unless they're cloaked under a pretentious veil.

That said, I loved the article, particularly as someone who studies psychology (and have touched some of those subjects a few times). That said, I'm saddened by the fact that the majority of people (everywhere, not just Americans) have a very low comprehension level, usually due to under-stimulation, which, consequently, dumbs down media in general.

The most atrocious example of such case to me is I Am Legend. Ending-related Spoilers necessary to explain:

...Anyways. Essay, I know... Great article.

I pride myself on being able to read The Odyssey (Lattimore's translation), watch Carlos Reygada's films (and enjoy them) and listen to Steve Reich (and tell you which bits I like best and which are coming next).
If this makes me a snob, then so be it!

I guess that makes me a music snob. I prefer the sounds of the 17 piece Big Bands over modern music any day, seems so much more elaborate than Korn or MegaDeath and therefore beautiful in it's complexity.

However my grandfather was leagues ahead of me in the reading snob category, wrote a book on debate and the "rules" that guide it back in the 70's. Goes WAY over my head.
Pantherman

So let's start with the first problem:
For being an article that wants to talk about content comprehension, the author then tries to re-purpose the definition of a word. Snob, definition, Mirram-Webster: http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/snob

That strike anyone as a little weird that he didn't find a more precise term? Maybe even ironic?

Then there's what seems to be a backhanded strike at Kotaku, or at least that writer, on a game that can't and won't ever strike the upper echelon of gaming. Just a little unfair, that.

Look I have no problem with suggesting that people have different tastes and that there is an intellectual comprehension that comes with appreciation. The idea that you (or I) might have more sophisticated tastes which has us leaving behind objects of lesser quality is the kind of thing that isn't new-but ought to be promoted and encouraged.

You know why we get shit like Transformers 2? Because enough people are willing to say: But I just wanna see shit blow up! I don't care if everything else sucks! Even though there are a ton of action movies out there that do things better in every other department.

The flipside of this is; old Warner Bros cartoons endure because you can see them as a child and they're hilarious. Then you can see them as an adult and they are /even funnier/. They're beloved and will be for decades to come because of their ability to appeal to such a broad audience and much of Zero Punctuation mines a similar vein (although instead of child I'd say teenager as its starting point.)

However, I don't think the author's case is forwarded very well in this article. His language is imprecise and it shouldn't be, his tone is condescending "What an enigma (or mystery, to you 4th grade readers)!" and there's no reason for it, there's no call to action, that is; no suggestion that we ought to 1) demand more 2) teach others 3) engage ourselves at higher levels, and the article ends on these loaded questions, "Do you consider yourself game snobs? Web snobs? Am I right that ZP is funny on multiple levels.... Or is it really just all about the codpiece?"

Given the article I just read, isn't answering "It's about the codpiece" just the kind of thing that opens me up to ridicule? Why the fuck would I say; yup, I'm in it for the dick jokes.

The other side of this is that sometimes, EVERYBODY is in it for the dick joke. I read Daredevil, not Maus, I like Andrew WK not the Decemberists, and I loved Resident Evil 4 but am in no hurry to play Heavy Rain.

Let's push it even further; I don't know the first thing about cars. I can change a tire. I know what looks cool and that's about it. Anyone who does know about cars can do one of two things; be a snob-which /by definition/ means they're looking down on me because I'm inferior since I don't know what they do, or educate me about something their passionate about. Which would you rather have?

TL:dr-I like the concept but the finale didn't work due to the use of language that should've been better than it was.

But that's just my opinion, man.

Thank you for your exceptionally kind words on the article. I concur completely that the direction they steered I am Legend ruined the profoundity of the story. Now on to whether you're a snob...

Caliostro:
I'm going to contest this. By your very own definition I would seemingly be a snob. I'm easily able to read and interpret everything you wrote, and in fact regularly read scientific articles for college. I love Bach, Pachelbel, Mozart, Carl Maria von Weber, and many more themed "classical" artists. Yet I'm not entirely restricted to those things.

Then by my definition you are NOT a snob, since my definition was "to be a consumer only willing to consume content created at a high comprehension level." I didn't say "to be a consumer CAPABLE of consuming content created at a high comprehension level."

For instance, I am capable of reading War & Peace, but mostly I read R.A. Salvatore. That may make me a dweeb, but not a snob!

At the risk of sounding like a snob (or a prick), I'll admit I seem to have higher standards than most people, but I don't subscribe to the idea that just because I like what you'd consider "higher comprehension level" media, that I'm limited to it.

So then you are not a snob under my definition.

Partially because I don't believe something requires a high comprehension level to be good...

And you are therefore not a snob under my definition.

So that said, do you disagree with my definition of snob because you think you ARE a snob? Or did you misunderstand my definition of snob, and we agree that are you not...

The only problem that I have with this article is that it failed to give a good understanding of what, exactly, the Flesch-Kincaid reading numbers are/what they do. I took a class here at my university which explained it, and I found this wikipedia article that helps to explain what the numbers mean:

So, yes, the scale may be somewhat misleading at times.

OT: Agreed that ZP has multiple levels of comprehension. I think what this scale doesn't take into consideration, though, is that there are certain allusions that would not be accessible to people. The most recent example I can think of is a scene in Iron Man 2 in which Justin Hammer is talking about a small bullet-looking weapon that is so smart "it would make Ulysses look like it was written in crayon" or something to that effect. Having read Ulysses and struggled with it (the footnotes took up half the page), I began laughing quite hardily at this comment; my other non-English-major friends didn't quite understand. I'm not sure if that's an actual grade level thing or just a snobbery type thing though.

As my Drama teacher used to say "If you run out of ways to make a scene funny, use a knob gag. If that doesn't work, use ten." Everyone can appreciate a knob gag but it's nice to add other levels of comedy as well.

Archon:
Thank you for your exceptionally kind words on the article. I concur completely that the direction they steered I am Legend ruined the profoundity of the story. Now on to whether you're a snob...

Then by my definition you are NOT a snob, since my definition was "to be a consumer only willing to consume content created at a high comprehension level." I didn't say "to be a consumer CAPABLE of consuming content created at a high comprehension level."

For instance, I am capable of reading War & Peace, but mostly I read R.A. Salvatore. That may make me a dweeb, but not a snob!

So then you are not a snob under my definition.

And you are therefore not a snob under my definition.

So that said, do you disagree with my definition of snob because you think you ARE a snob? Or did you misunderstand my definition of snob, and we agree that are you not...

Misunderstood your definition. It seemed like you were implying that to be able to enjoy high comprehension level material one was inherently self-limited to it (i.e.: If you're the kind of person that likes Bach, then you're not the kind of person that likes anything "lower level", like pop music).

Cheers.

Let the groundlings like what they like. I began visiting the Escapist strictly because it stood virtually alone in its willingness to apologetically use the English language well. I really am not much of a gamer, but I enjoy intelligence wherever I can find it.

I would most definitely be a musical snob, I have very progressive tastes, and have disdain for just about anything I hear on the radio. Then again, I've been playing guitar since I was 16, being so immersed in one particular avenue, and you're obviously only going to accept only the best, the most nuanced and intricate. I'm sure everyone has something they understand much better than the average joe, even if they don't know it. I don't really "get" poetry, say. Sure, I can recognise iambic pentameter or other forms, but when people talk about it like how I describe music, ebbing and flowing, or evoking an emotional response, I know a lot is lost on me.

I don't really know what the point of that rambling was; I guess my prose comprehension is pretty low too. ;)

This is something that is happening in all languages, trust me, some spanish newspapers in my country are totally sad. When I left the primary school I was able to read "El Quixote" now a 7th grade kid can't read a comic.

Smokescreen:
So let's start with the first problem:
For being an article that wants to talk about content comprehension, the author then tries to re-purpose the definition of a word. Snob, definition, Mirram-Webster: http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/snob
That strike anyone as a little weird that he didn't find a more precise term? Maybe even ironic?

Is there a word that I ought to have used that would have better expressed my point? Everyone else here seems to have understood what I meant.

Then there's what seems to be a backhanded strike at Kotaku, or at least that writer, on a game that can't and won't ever strike the upper echelon of gaming. Just a little unfair, that.

Kotaku's article was, in fact, written at the 4th grade level. I verfied this with an online measurement of the Gunning Fog score. If you have an issue with it, take it up with the writer and/or blog. Incidentally, as the rest of the article pointed out, having a low reading level is also the same thing as having a high readability. Romance novels and newspapers AIM to have the highest possible readability on purpose. I suspect Kotaku, if it bothered to measure its grade level, would wear its score with pride. If they are, in fact, offended, all they have to do is use bigger words. Either way, it's not my problem.

Look I have no problem with suggesting that people have different tastes and that there is an intellectual comprehension that comes with appreciation. The idea that you (or I) might have more sophisticated tastes which has us leaving behind objects of lesser quality is the kind of thing that isn't new-but ought to be promoted and encouraged.

If this is your encouragement, I hate to see how you write when you want to discourage people!

However, I don't think the author's case is forwarded very well in this article. His language is imprecise and it shouldn't be, his tone is condescending "What an enigma (or mystery, to you 4th grade readers)!" and there's no reason for it, there's no call to action, that is; no suggestion that we ought to 1) demand more 2) teach others 3) engage ourselves at higher levels, and the article ends on these loaded questions, "Do you consider yourself game snobs? Web snobs? Am I right that ZP is funny on multiple levels.... Or is it really just all about the codpiece?"

There's no suggestion that we should demand more because the point is that people can't handle "more". In fact, people who've studied the matter have concluded the solution is "write for a less-educated audience". My conclusion was that you could try and have your cake and eat it too with densely packed writing.

Let's push it even further; I don't know the first thing about cars. I can change a tire. I know what looks cool and that's about it. Anyone who does know about cars can do one of two things; be a snob-which /by definition/ means they're looking down on me because I'm inferior since I don't know what they do, or educate me about something their passionate about. Which would you rather have?

I think the underlying message of the article is that success doesn't necessarily go to the guy with the highest grade level of writing, and that we have to dig past snobbery to understand why some things work and some don't.

It is, however, notable that the Gunning-Fog index does not take into account the content of the media it covers, merely the ease with which it is understandable.
It is also astounding how easily an article like this one really brings out the more obscure parts of escapists' vocabulary.

Or, basically, how we all start using less common words coupled with a more complex sentence structure in a bid to appear more intelligent, or possibly merely to show off.

Heh, force-feedback codpiece...

Nimbus:
I had to read that about four times to understand what the hell you were on about. Essentially all you are saying is that rules dictate how the choices which the players make will effect the game, covered over with several layers of jargon. It just seems like you were using a higher "grade" then necessary to convey your point.

You missed the subtext: The rules additionally affect the player's interactions, they don't simply define the effects. (c wut i did thar?)

J03bot:
It is, however, notable that the Gunning-Fog index does not take into account the content of the media it covers, merely the ease with which it is understandable.
It is also astounding how easily an article like this one really brings out the more obscure parts of escapists' vocabulary.

Or, basically, how we all start using less common words coupled with a more complex sentence structure in a bid to appear more intelligent, or possibly merely to show off.

Heh, force-feedback codpiece...

Heh, that rings a little true. I was writing a sentence with a comma, but then said to myself "No! No, now it's time for Mr. semi-colon!"

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