253: Gamers of the Third World

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Gamers of the Third World

The games industry refers to the "Western" and "Eastern" markets, which roughly breaks down to U.S. and Japan respectively, but the rest of the world is often overlooked. Michael Thomsen reminds us how the Third World plays games.

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A very interesting read, I never actually gave much to 3rd World Gamers.

I can relate alot to it, when I had my 1st PS1 and Tekken, I was literally drooling over the sheer awesomeness the game displayed upon my small SDTV. I thank you for this small but very in-dept perspective you gave me and the rest of the Escapist.

A fascinating reminder about how other people in the world view the same events as I do, through a completely different filter.

I am old enough to remember the awesomeness of Wheel of Fortune on an 8086, so I get the attraction games can hold for everyone.

Inspiring read. It is interesting to gain a small insight into gaming in environments so different to my own, and fascinating although not too surprising to see that a lot of games really are universal.

Great article.
You never really pay attention to things like that when you're pissed off about how you didn't get the newest game on day one.

well, I live in Argentina, not exactly a third world country, but not as developed as the rest of the western world. Pricing is the main problem here, after a game has gone through customs and everything I have to pay an average of USD 80 for a new game, and about USD 500 for a PS3. Steam has reduced the price for my PC games dramatically, which is great.

I'm in SA which is a "second world" country, for lack of a better phrase. Even many poor people do have or participate in gaming. I see it all the time, so this article doesn't strike too much with me.

Eliam_Dar:
well, I live in Argentina, not exactly a third world country, but not as developed as the rest of the western world. Pricing is the main problem here, after a game has gone through customs and everything I have to pay an average of USD 80 for a new game, and about USD 500 for a PS3. Steam has reduced the price for my PC games dramatically, which is great.

Congratulations. You have better prices than Australia.

And gaming will inevitably become widespread in rapidly growing countries such as China and India with their burgeoning middle classes.

I've read before about how gaming has infiltrated and filtered down to the poorest nations, where having enough money to eat food and have clothing can be considered a successful life. It astounds me how impacted people are by flashing colors and ringing noises, despite living conditions that are abysmal at best. Living in the USA, I don't often see things from that perspective, and I know it shouldn't, but it always does come as a surprise. Some people think that gaming is something that should only be for the rich, the powerful, but the same was said about music and books before technology advanced enough to bring them to everyone. Gaming may not yet hold the same lofty ideals as those other mediums possess, but time marches ever forward, and it seems inevitable that the day will come when anyone across the globe can partake together in the latest and greatest.

A lot of American gamers tend to forget that video games are a hobby, and hobbies in general are luxuries only available to people with significant disposable income. I like the comparison of arcades to art galleries - the modern video game enthusiast really is quite similar to art collectors of previous eras, one need look no further than this very website to determine that. We take the availability of games for granted, many gamers arrogantly act as though non-gamers are inferior, and the industry is discussed with such gravitas you'd think it was the most important thing in the world. It's nice to get this sort of humbling reality check now and again.

Good article, but I didnt quite understand this.

Console gaming will never go away.. It will continue to host the medium's most spectacular and technically sophisticated works.

Huh? No it doesn't? Am I missing something here?

I suppose he could be saying that it will host multi-platform titles the same as PC does, but I don't really see where consoles specifically host exclusively technically proficient titles.

I would like to see countries like Brazil and China handle pricing of games and consoles. I wanna see them be able tob uy the real things instead of ROM hacks

I live in the former Eastern Block (Slovakia). Even after 20 years, consoles are still rare and almost everyone plays their games on a PC.

I remember, back in the 90's, that every single game that I've had was pirated. No exceptions. Mainly because they were horribly expensive or not sold at all. Piracy was rampant then and even today it is still high.

Today I can easily and relatively cheaply buy games with Steam. There are also shops dedicated to games now.

Frankly, it's a relief to finally see an article that gains some perspective on this, Mr Thomsen.

I know that some writers on The Escapist could do with a reality check regarding how much harder it is to buy a game if you're not in the first world. The support I see in these articles for expensive services, paying for virtual and unreal products, leasing server space instead of buying a physical copy of a game, and DLC in general needs to slow the Hell down if not outright stop.

I think the magazine is caught between being very pro-consumer and not realising how much the consumer actually goes through regarding games and their expensiveness as a luxury item which has a super-large profit margin - it costs far less to create a game than you make out of it, especially with the big releases. So consumers are getting rorted on a regular basis. Let's hope that writers are reading closely.

ENKC:
Congratulations. You have better prices than Australia.

Wrong, at least in the case of his example. 500USD translates roughly to 557.55AUD, and a PS3 will cost from $499 (same price as his) to $650 here according to this site:

http://www.myshopping.com.au/PR--88814_Sony_Playstation_3_Console

I like to complain about our game prices too, but at least they're not worse than Argentina's in this case. Maybe they are overall, but it would take a serious study to say for sure.

I feel that the article is somewhat out of date. While access to games is pretty uneven - mainly urban vs rural, there is a pretty large Gaming community in India.

Besides this I really don't have to hunt around or buy pirated copies of Games, consoles, games and the various paraphernalia are pretty much readily available. I think I just had to wait about a month or so before something like Mass Effect 2 hit the stores (A game with which I was deeply disappointed btw).

I suspect the situation is much more true in China with its armies of Game addicts, treatment camps and social pressure groups trying to put a lid on their childrens' excessive playing.

Africa may be another story, but beyond that I dont see even other south Asian nations being "left out" of the Gaming world. Its just that for whatever reason they are never considered in the west.

Silva:
Frankly, it's a relief to finally see an article that gains some perspective on this, Mr Thomsen.

I know that some writers on The Escapist could do with a reality check regarding how much harder it is to buy a game if you're not in the first world. The support I see in these articles for expensive services, paying for virtual and unreal products, leasing server space instead of buying a physical copy of a game, and DLC in general needs to slow the Hell down if not outright stop.

I think the magazine is caught between being very pro-consumer and not realising how much the consumer actually goes through regarding games and their expensiveness as a luxury item which has a super-large profit margin - it costs far less to create a game than you make out of it, especially with the big releases. So consumers are getting rorted on a regular basis. Let's hope that writers are reading closely.

ENKC:
Congratulations. You have better prices than Australia.

Wrong, at least in the case of his example. 500USD translates roughly to 557.55AUD, and a PS3 will cost from $499 (same price as his) to $650 here according to this site:

http://www.myshopping.com.au/PR--88814_Sony_Playstation_3_Console

I like to complain about our game prices too, but at least they're not worse than Argentina's in this case. Maybe they are overall, but it would take a serious study to say for sure.

'Wrong' is a strong word. I was referring to the part of his post wherein he pays $80 USD on average for games. New release 360/PS3 games here go for up to $120 AUD, which is in the vicinity of $110 USD.

I, personally, would never pay these prices. And as much of a boon as Steam is, even then they charge Australians up to $30 USD more for the same games as the US store. Presumably they do this because they can, but it defeats a major potential advantage of a digital distribution platform (ie standard pricing worldwide).

ENKC:

'Wrong' is a strong word. I was referring to the part of his post wherein he pays $80 USD on average for games. New release 360/PS3 games here go for up to $120 AUD, which is in the vicinity of $110 USD.

I, personally, would never pay these prices. And as much of a boon as Steam is, even then they charge Australians up to $30 USD more for the same games as the US store. Presumably they do this because they can, but it defeats a major potential advantage of a digital distribution platform (ie standard pricing worldwide).

that's weird I pay US prices on steam

Eliam_Dar:

ENKC:

'Wrong' is a strong word. I was referring to the part of his post wherein he pays $80 USD on average for games. New release 360/PS3 games here go for up to $120 AUD, which is in the vicinity of $110 USD.

I, personally, would never pay these prices. And as much of a boon as Steam is, even then they charge Australians up to $30 USD more for the same games as the US store. Presumably they do this because they can, but it defeats a major potential advantage of a digital distribution platform (ie standard pricing worldwide).

that's weird I pay US prices on steam

Are you in Australia? You'll find that whilst the currency you pay in is USD, some prices are different.

Borderlands is $79.99 USD on Australian Steam
Borderlands is $29.99 USD on American Steam

Try explaining how that's anything other than price gouging (not you, the world generally).

ENKC:

Eliam_Dar:

ENKC:

'Wrong' is a strong word. I was referring to the part of his post wherein he pays $80 USD on average for games. New release 360/PS3 games here go for up to $120 AUD, which is in the vicinity of $110 USD.

I, personally, would never pay these prices. And as much of a boon as Steam is, even then they charge Australians up to $30 USD more for the same games as the US store. Presumably they do this because they can, but it defeats a major potential advantage of a digital distribution platform (ie standard pricing worldwide).

that's weird I pay US prices on steam

Are you in Australia? You'll find that whilst the currency you pay in is USD, some prices are different.

Borderlands is $79.99 USD on Australian Steam
Borderlands is $29.99 USD on American Steam

Try explaining how that's anything other than price gouging (not you, the world generally).

mmm, it seems I cut too much of the previos comments, I meant that me, being in Argentina, pay the US prices on the steam store. It sounded weird to me that you have to pay such a big difference. Though I agree on one point, it is extremely unfair.

I am curious though, how much do you pay for, lets say a dualshock 3? I am paying USD 65 for each one

Eliam_Dar:

ENKC:

Eliam_Dar:

ENKC:

'Wrong' is a strong word. I was referring to the part of his post wherein he pays $80 USD on average for games. New release 360/PS3 games here go for up to $120 AUD, which is in the vicinity of $110 USD.

I, personally, would never pay these prices. And as much of a boon as Steam is, even then they charge Australians up to $30 USD more for the same games as the US store. Presumably they do this because they can, but it defeats a major potential advantage of a digital distribution platform (ie standard pricing worldwide).

that's weird I pay US prices on steam

Are you in Australia? You'll find that whilst the currency you pay in is USD, some prices are different.

Borderlands is $79.99 USD on Australian Steam
Borderlands is $29.99 USD on American Steam

Try explaining how that's anything other than price gouging (not you, the world generally).

mmm, it seems I cut too much of the previos comments, I meant that me, being in Argentina, pay the US prices on the steam store. It sounded weird to me that you have to pay such a big difference. Though I agree on one point, it is extremely unfair.

I am curious though, how much do you pay for, lets say a dualshock 3? I am paying USD 65 for each one

A DualShock 3 had an RRP of $99.95 in Australia on launch. You'd still pay up to $90 for it at retail. And our dollar is worth roughly $0.90 USD.

ENKC:

A DualShock 3 had an RRP of $99.95 in Australia on launch. You'd still pay up to $90 for it at retail. And our dollar is worth roughly $0.90 USD.

ok, it seems that I should stop complaining about the pricing. I was almost sure we paid a lot, it seems you pay even more

Eliam_Dar:

ENKC:

A DualShock 3 had an RRP of $99.95 in Australia on launch. You'd still pay up to $90 for it at retail. And our dollar is worth roughly $0.90 USD.

ok, it seems that I should stop complaining about the pricing. I was almost sure we paid a lot, it seems you pay even more

let us shake fist in unison!

*shakesfist furiously*

ENKC:

Are you in Australia? You'll find that whilst the currency you pay in is USD, some prices are different.

Borderlands is $79.99 USD on Australian Steam
Borderlands is $29.99 USD on American Steam

Try explaining how that's anything other than price gouging (not you, the world generally).

Honestly, AU gamers are a tenacious bunch. I don't think I'd be able to continue with this hobby if every game I wanted to buy was either censored or 200% more expensive than other Western countries.

Do you have any friends in America? You could always work out a deal with them where you send them money to buy the games for you and then they gift the games to your account. It's what I do when something comes out that's not in my region (damn you Rockstar for not extending your Steam license to Japan!).

My opinion on the subject is mixed.

The Third World is what it is for a reason, in my opinion these guys should be spending money on other things, and working on fixing their country, rather than playing video games to begin with. That might seem rather cruel on some levels, but simply put the US and Japan have these kinds of entertainment industries because we've managed to build a society capable of sustaining them.

One also has to look into the govermental and business practices of some of these countries. A few articles have talked about Chinese business laws and the pitfalls companies like Blizzard have had to face to release their product there... in some cases it's not just about money, but also about the system the country is operating under, and how easy it is to do business in that part of the world.

Truthfully video games are not a major concern for me globally. I have mentioned on numerous occasions I think the gaming industry has gotten greedy and is demanding a ridiculous profit margin to cover ever-expanding developer paydays along with the producer's returns. BUT I see this as being connected to the entire issue of patent knock offs and such, with third world countries manufacturing/pirating goods for sale and cutting out the creators. I do not think the third world is justified in their piracy because of their poverty or govermental system.... and more compelling cases can be made based on knock offs of things like medicine than entertainment media.

Honestly I think the gaming industry as a whole needs a kick in the teeth so to speak. As people have pointed out the industry has made billions, but at the same time you have developers crying poverty to justify lay offs and the like. Truthfully the industry is such a corrupt mess that I'm not sure if many people even at the game companies even know what it's actual state is. In today's world an excuse to lay people off to make more money by lowering expenses, and genuine financial jeopardy are almost impossible to differentiate because only a select few people are going to know the actual truth of such a situation. Ditto for claims of "losses" in a world of "projected profits" and simply making too little profit can be considered (and treated as) a loss. It's like that with most businesses actually (not just the gaming industry) but it still blows chips.

That said while lowering game prices is something I can see happening, I do not think the prices could, or should, be lowered to the point where those in a third world country can afford them... don't get me wrong, it's not that I don't feel for these people to some extent, but we're talking about bloody video games. Compared to all the other things wrong
in those countries I think "how can a third worlder afford a playstation, and play the latest games"? (which seems to be the point of this article) is a petty concern.

If anyone is going to be guilted and leveraged it should be drug companies and such (which happens). I'm both more concerned over the knock offs of those products overall, and at the same time can see medicine as an actual nessecity.

I really enjoyed this article. It shows that people around the world can enjoy the same things. We are much more alike than we are different.

Therumancer:
My opinion on the subject is mixed.

The Third World is what it is for a reason, in my opinion these guys should be spending money on other things, and working on fixing their country, rather than playing video games to begin with. That might seem rather cruel on some levels, but simply put the US and Japan have these kinds of entertainment industries because we've managed to build a society capable of sustaining them.

One also has to look into the govermental and business practices of some of these countries. A few articles have talked about Chinese business laws and the pitfalls companies like Blizzard have had to face to release their product there... in some cases it's not just about money, but also about the system the country is operating under, and how easy it is to do business in that part of the world.

Truthfully video games are not a major concern for me globally. I have mentioned on numerous occasions I think the gaming industry has gotten greedy and is demanding a ridiculous profit margin to cover ever-expanding developer paydays along with the producer's returns. BUT I see this as being connected to the entire issue of patent knock offs and such, with third world countries manufacturing/pirating goods for sale and cutting out the creators. I do not think the third world is justified in their piracy because of their poverty or govermental system.... and more compelling cases can be made based on knock offs of things like medicine than entertainment media.

Honestly I think the gaming industry as a whole needs a kick in the teeth so to speak. As people have pointed out the industry has made billions, but at the same time you have developers crying poverty to justify lay offs and the like. Truthfully the industry is such a corrupt mess that I'm not sure if many people even at the game companies even know what it's actual state is. In today's world an excuse to lay people off to make more money by lowering expenses, and genuine financial jeopardy are almost impossible to differentiate because only a select few people are going to know the actual truth of such a situation. Ditto for claims of "losses" in a world of "projected profits" and simply making too little profit can be considered (and treated as) a loss. It's like that with most businesses actually (not just the gaming industry) but it still blows chips.

That said while lowering game prices is something I can see happening, I do not think the prices could, or should, be lowered to the point where those in a third world country can afford them... don't get me wrong, it's not that I don't feel for these people to some extent, but we're talking about bloody video games. Compared to all the other things wrong
in those countries I think "how can a third worlder afford a playstation, and play the latest games"? (which seems to be the point of this article) is a petty concern.

If anyone is going to be guilted and leveraged it should be drug companies and such (which happens). I'm both more concerned over the knock offs of those products overall, and at the same time can see medicine as an actual nessecity.

I will refrain from insulting you and just say you have a very naive worldview.

Also i suggest you study some history (and i dont mean american history) plus some economics so you can have a better understanding of why 3rd world countries are 3rd world countries.

carpathic:
A fascinating reminder about how other people in the world view the same events as I do, through a completely different filter.

Can relate to you, it's much like hearing about the people who live nearby me that treats going to the movies as if it was the awesomest and rarest vacation plan ever.

Even the so called universal mediums have a long way to go to be acessible to everyone, I just wish gaming would take it seriously (other than the indie scene, kudos to them for trying their earnest).

I will refrain from insulting you and just say you have a very naive worldview.

Also i suggest you study some history (and i dont mean american history) plus some economics so you can have a better understanding of why 3rd world countries are 3rd world countries.[/quote]

Well thanks for not insulting this "naive one".

For the record I've studied quite a bit of history, from a number of perspectives, and have a pretty good grasp of economics. I also happen to follow the gaming industry a bit, as well as issues like patent rights.

I would point out that "The Escapist" itself has done bits on gamers outside of the US/Europe/Japan in the past with mixed messages. As have other sites. A lot of what you've said isn't especially new overall.

Truthfully every country has reasons for the way it's wound up, and heck, I'm one of the first people who will say that there are too many people and not enough resources on the planet (in general). That however does not change the fact that there should be bigger concerns in these regions than gaming.

That said, I do agree with you on the pricing of video games. ANOTHER article here on The Escapist talked about Brazil. It was called "Nation of Pirates" or something like that, and it covered a lot of the same ground that you did, albiet focusing on another part of the world. One notable thing about that was the point that Brazilian crime syndicates were apparently able to make massive fortunes on pirated games, with some of these groups (if I remember) even being able to construct and run their own malls and such.

While not intended I took away from that simply that if that much money is being generated by selling games for roughly $5.00 a pop, even considering development costs (which the pirates do not have) games could be massively cheaper and still generate a decent profit margin.

The Escapist also once did an interview with the head of the 1C company (Russian) which talked about his profit margins on an average game, and how much extra money he could take as pure profit by cutting out packaging, distribution, etc... as part of embracing digital distribution. No mention was made of lowering prices though, and that there also pointed out that your fundementally correct about what games could cost and still make a profit. It's notcible that the article on Brazil also made a point about the pirate games not being packaged the way they are here (ie being sold in plastic baggies with a self created printout with the game's logo/cover art).

That said however, with all of the concerns in these other countries, and how poor the people are, I don't see anything paticularly "wrong" or "naive" in saying that they should
be concerned about other things than video games.

I'll also be entirely blunt in saying that internal problems can't typically be resolved/changed by external force. This is why the way we (the US) are approaching things like "The War On Terror" aren't going so well. You can't occupy and "win the peace" this way (I won't go into my overall opinions on the conflict). Simply put problems with a nation or culture have to be resolved by the people themselves even if painful and bloody. Despite what someone might think, you can't reasonably swoop in as a foreign power, change things, and expect it to work. Even the people who hate the current regime are going to tend to resist that.

Hence why I comment that the people would find their time better spent trying to change things. Oh sure, I understand that in some countries this can be very dangerous. But it doesn't change the fact that the people have to do it themselves, and yeah... while these nations might not ever become wealthy first world countries, I think a lot of places in the third world could be a lot better off than they are now... and chances are then the situation with video games and such could be a lot differant.

Personally for me, this was a great read. Its nice to know there are other gamers out there. In the state that some third world countries are in, a little light gaming must feel great.

ForgottenPr0digy:
I would like to see countries like Brazil and China handle pricing of games and consoles. I wanna see them be able tob uy the real things instead of ROM hacks

It would be tough to handle pricing in a way that they're high enough to make a profit, but low enough that people can afford it. For example, here in Costa Rica, games cost 80-90 dollars, but hacked copies cost less than 10 dollars.

I live in Brazil, that it's a country in 'development'. I mean, I know I can buy almost all the games I want and there are some other people who can do that too, but I also do know there are TONS of people here that pretty mucbh can't afford the games, let alone the consoles!

Too bad that, around here, game renting and or 'play by the hour' had been totally wiped out (at lest, in the places I used to go to play) when the new generation of consoles came along (PS3, Wii and X-Box 360). You still can find on or two places with PS2's with five to ten games available, but that's about it.

Still, piracy and some 'undercover' sells go on, and, hell, I support it! I'm not going to force someone that earns, like, 500 bucks a month or even less to buy a game that costs 250 just for a few hours of fun! This just doesn't make any sense.

So, hey, video game industry, you made almost 20 billion dolars last year. What are you whinning about exactly? Do they really think that a couple of kids in Costa Rica or any other small country hacking game is going to 'destroy the gaming industry as we know it'? I pretty much doubt it.

I find myself indifferent to the plight of developers suffering from piracy of the third world. It isn't like it really hurts Hollywood...

And couldn't developers include in game ads to off-set the cost even to piracy?

Therumancer:
That said, I do agree with you on the pricing of video games. ANOTHER article here on The Escapist talked about Brazil. It was called "Nation of Pirates" or something like that, and it covered a lot of the same ground that you did, albiet focusing on another part of the world. One notable thing about that was the point that Brazilian crime syndicates were apparently able to make massive fortunes on pirated games, with some of these groups (if I remember) even being able to construct and run their own malls and such.

I won't comment on anything else you've said, but I feel <really> good to have my article cited! First time I've seen it done on the internet.

^_^

And accurately too, as although I didn't quite make it completely clear in my article, although they're not very big, there are quite a few small malls in the center of the city that sell almost exclusively pirated goods and are, directly or indirectly, under control of these gangs. I have to admit that the news I've been seeing in the past year, from a distance, indicates that the police is beginning to crack down a bit more, although I'm doubtful of how much success they're having.

Concerning the article itself, I've seen similar things, but not to the same extent, in Brazil's poorer areas. Lan houses/internet cafes are pretty important businesses in the poorer areas and quite a lot of contact to the gaming culture occurs there, although the prevalent form of gaming for most is pure piracy (not just the poor, most people who could afford games don't pay either!), be it via organized crime, be it via the internet.

I've also witnessed in Brazil's more rural areas, although that was years ago, the phenomena of rental shops, where gaming systems (usually older ones) were available to play for a price (as well as games). So, certainly it seems that these sorts of developments are common in most 3rd world countries, although with a certain degree of variation for culture/gdp per capita.

And it makes sense too. Without a developed, legitimate gaming market, you'd expect to piracy and rent shops to take it's place, as most places <do> have contact with the gaming culture, be it old or new, thanks to the internet and 'globalization'.

Michael Thomsen:
PC gaming will never go away. It is to videogames what the movie theater is to filmed entertainment. It will continue to host the medium's most spectacular and technically sophisticated works. In the same way that the advance of broadcast television, pay cable, and internet distribution eventually filled out the medium of film to make it accessible and relevant to the entire world, so too will the environment that surrounds PC gaming continue to expand in ways that will include more and more people.

Fixed. :P

In any case, thank you for a very interesting article. Ever since I saw a picture of two NES consoles from North Korea, I was always amazed at just how widespread gaming is. It's very interesting to learn how they go about it in less developed countries.

An excellent article. We just spend a good chunk of time discussing how video games are and aren't art, and we forget what a select circle we're speaking of. Maybe those poor Madagascar children appreciate their bootleg Mario in a much deeper level we ever could.

ENKC:

Eliam_Dar:

ENKC:

'Wrong' is a strong word. I was referring to the part of his post wherein he pays $80 USD on average for games. New release 360/PS3 games here go for up to $120 AUD, which is in the vicinity of $110 USD.

I, personally, would never pay these prices. And as much of a boon as Steam is, even then they charge Australians up to $30 USD more for the same games as the US store. Presumably they do this because they can, but it defeats a major potential advantage of a digital distribution platform (ie standard pricing worldwide).

that's weird I pay US prices on steam

Are you in Australia? You'll find that whilst the currency you pay in is USD, some prices are different.

Borderlands is $79.99 USD on Australian Steam
Borderlands is $29.99 USD on American Steam

Try explaining how that's anything other than price gouging (not you, the world generally).

Taxes.

I'm Brazilian and while I don't have Steam I pay US prices on everything. What probably happens is that Australia has caught on and taxed online sales, which Steam must abide by (and hike up the price as to not take a loss) while Brazil and Argentina haven't already. Judging by Brazil's current tax policy they just haven't paid notice to this kind of sale, so my Latin American brethren better enjoy this while it lasts. (I know I am, buying GoG games like there's no tomorrow.)

Tom Phoenix:

Michael Thomsen:
PC gaming will never go away. It is to videogames what the movie theater is to filmed entertainment. It will continue to host the medium's most spectacular and technically sophisticated works. In the same way that the advance of broadcast television, pay cable, and internet distribution eventually filled out the medium of film to make it accessible and relevant to the entire world, so too will the environment that surrounds PC gaming continue to expand in ways that will include more and more people.

Fixed. :P

Sorry, but no. A PC needs to be set up and configured to run a game. A videogame needs only to be attached to a power source and have the 'on' button pushed[1]. Until PCs become so widespread even bedouins are carrying one, (and I'm talking about people who probably don't even carry radios), videogames will be spearheading this revolution.

[1] Some vigourous cartridge blowing may be necessary as well.

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