View from the Road: When I Was a Pirate

 Pages 1 2 3 4 5 6 NEXT
 

View from the Road: When I Was a Pirate

There's an entirely different side to piracy that most of us never think about.

Read Full Article

Ahh...The R4.

My aunt bought one for her son. I'm tempted to steal it and then break it everytime I see it.

Ah yes, China, 'tis a odd country...

The R4. I owned one and used one regularly before I paid little interest to how the gaming (or, I suppose, any) industry worked. I realised that I should probably start paying for games, keep going, or stop playing.

I stopped.

Also, my worst experience ever with pirated games was me thinking I had a nice early copy of Leaf Green. Yeah, it turned Chinese half way through.

Rainboq:
Ah yes, China, 'tis a odd country...

not just odd but one which seems, despite it's oppression, keen to break all the rules. Better or for worse

How was this guy a real pirate? didn't he just buy a R4 (what ever that is, you guys may know but he fails to explain it)

He also bashes Pirates acting like they are some evil force in developed countries, they aren't I guarantee you, you will never find a pirate who pirates because he is greedy for games (only applies in developed countries) Look my uncle and his friend pirated all the time, they knew how to hack and everything, but they still bought the games they could easily hack if they wanted too, and almost never played the ones that they did, and if they did, it was usually to test it out to see if it actually worked. The reason they hack, they pirate, is because they can, so they can see their own capabilities. They do it so they can test their selves, hone their abilities, boast about their talent! Video game designers will NEVER EVER Get rid of pirates, because even with all the DRM in the world, the pirates will still attempt to get past it, and they will always succeed, then become better, so when the designers throw the next curve ball, they are that much more ready for it. Video game Designers perpetuate pirating with DRM and ways to stop them from getting the games, there would be no pirates if their was nothing stopping them from getting the game illegally.

Interestingly enough, I came across one of those yesterday while walking down the streets of Beijing. There was nothing worth my while, but I know what you mean when you talk about the stores like that.

Good article. It's a new perspective I hadn't really considered before. As a publisher, it definitely makes sense to not translate your big new AAA title for a country so in the grip of pirates. However, I wonder what the state of a developer like, say, Popcap would be in those countries. They already sell their games for cheap in affluent nations ($3 for Plants Vs. Zombies on iPhone, and $20 for a physical CD version), so it probably wouldn't be a big leap for them to slash costs for poorer nations. Maybe publishers should look at a tiered model, where they produce cheap, easily ported games for all areas (preferably with an MMO component for extra $) as well as the $20 million extravaganzas for Japan, US, and Europe. Maybe that's why casual games are all the rage; besides ease of playability, they're much more easily made competitive against pirates.

Strangely enough, I live in a tiny island (Malta, but you've probably never heard of it) and it's not an underdeveloped country, yet piracy is the thing around here. ALL the people I know have at least pirated ONE thing in their life, be it music, video games, films, etc. But no one ever thinks about how piracy is bad or what not. It's actually a way of life for us. I myself have stopped pirating, but everone else still does, and acts shocked whenver I tell them I'm going to buy game and not just buy it (unless it's for mulitplayer reasons).

It's easy to act like economic issues don't apply to first-world countries, but there are large portions of the population that simply can't afford games, especially at launch price. The whole "pirates are largely jerks who know they're being unethical" paradigm strikes me as unrealistic at best and obnoxiously privileged at worst.

As a college student basically living on federal aid/loans (and ramen, literally foregoing coupon-affected sales at Dominoes as "too expensive"), there's simply no way I can pay for more than a couple games a quarter, and I've really pirated less and less each quarter, and you know what? I haven't been buying more games; I've been buying less games. Much less. I got into a game competitively (cause if I'm not playing new games, I'd rather get better at the games I have) and basically shut myself out of the usual "follow gaming scene and try innovative titles" cycle.

Until that point, piracy was the only thing keeping me even marginally in the loop. I might pirate a few games, and of the ones I liked, buy one or two and make the most of them. But I literally haven't purchased a game since L4D1's second $25 sale, and I haven't pirated anything since around that time either.

And it's not like I'm not interested in gaming anymore--I play the games I own all the time and follow sites like Escapist and Gamasutra--I just never get a chance to actually play new games and so never have the confidence to spend what little money I have on a new one.

To act like I--or any of the other countless people in similar situations to me--are inherently unethical jerks just because we don't live in a developing nation is excessively deontological (at the cost of any shred of utilitarianism).

Plazmatic:
How was this guy a real pirate? didn't he just buy a R4 (what ever that is, you guys may know but he fails to explain it)

He also bashes Pirates acting like they are some evil force in developed countries, they aren't I guarantee you, you will never find a pirate who pirates because he is greedy for games (only applies in developed countries) Look my uncle and his friend pirated all the time, they knew how to hack and everything, but they still bought the games they could easily hack if they wanted too, and almost never played the ones that they did, and if they did, it was usually to test it out to see if it actually worked. The reason they hack, they pirate, is because they can, so they can see their own capabilities. They do it so they can test their selves, hone their abilities, boast about their talent! Video game designers will NEVER EVER Get rid of pirates, because even with all the DRM in the world, the pirates will still attempt to get past it, and they will always succeed, then become better, so when the designers throw the next curve ball, they are that much more ready for it. Video game Designers perpetuate pirating with DRM and ways to stop them from getting the games, there would be no pirates if their was nothing stopping them from getting the game illegally.

These pirates are in the minority to the point where publishers can't possibly care about them. Most pirates (who aren't real pirates -- I'd save that title for people like your uncle) just download a pre-cracked game via torrents. They are mostly inexcusably immoral thieves who should stop.

OT: I think developers need to make a choice -- either they care about localizing the games in these countries and start to horn out the piracy, or they just (continue to) let the market go. It's a lot easier to ignore it, probably. Also, these types of things really need to be taken into account on all those reports of really high piracy rates. It's technically piracy, but in a market the publishers clearly don't care to have.

Plazmatic:
I guarantee you, you will never find a pirate who pirates because he is greedy for games (only applies in developed countries)

If you will pardon my french:

Bull. Shit.

That is the reason that 99% of pirates pirate.

G-Mang:
It's easy to act like economic issues don't apply to first-world countries, but there are large portions of the population that simply can't afford games, especially at launch price. The whole "pirates are largely jerks who know they're being unethical" paradigm strikes me as unrealistic at best and obnoxiously privileged at worst.

As a college student basically living on federal aid/loans (and ramen, literally foregoing coupon-affected sales at Dominoes as "too expensive"), there's simply no way I can pay for more than a couple games a quarter, and I've really pirated less and less each quarter, and you know what? I haven't been buying more games; I've been buying less games. Much less. I got into a game competitively (cause if I'm not playing new games, I'd rather get better at the games I have) and basically shut myself out of the usual "follow gaming scene and try innovative titles" cycle.

Until that point, piracy was the only thing keeping me even marginally in the loop. I might pirate a few games, and of the ones I liked, buy one or two and make the most of them. But I literally haven't purchased a game since L4D1's second $25 sale, and I haven't pirated anything since around that time either.

And it's not like I'm not interested in gaming anymore--I play the games I own all the time and follow sites like Escapist and Gamasutra--I just never get a chance to actually play new games and so never have the confidence to spend what little money I have on a new one.

To act like I--or any of the other countless people in similar situations to me--are inherently unethical jerks just because we don't live in a developing nation is excessively deontological (at the cost of any shred of utilitarianism).

I was a college student once too. Even now, my disposable income is pretty limited. We all have to make sacrifices. Rent games? Buy bargain-bin games? Borrow them from friends?

Why do you get to have things for free? You don't. You either save up for them, find another way, or go without. You aren't entitled to get something for free just because you want to.

You aren't entitled to get something for free just because you want to.

If it isn't to the detriment of anyone else then why not?

I am of course assuming they wouldn't buy the game in the first place. I know no one who would have bought it but pirates it instead.

RMcD94:

You aren't entitled to get something for free just because you want to.

If it isn't to the detriment of anyone else then why not?

I am of course assuming they wouldn't buy the game in the first place. I know no one who would have bought it but pirates it instead.

Because it is. You are taking something that someone spent time and money on, for free, when they have the right to receive money for their hard work.

That's a bullshit excuse that people use because they feel entitled to get things that cost money for free.

John Funk:

G-Mang:

*snip*

I was a college student once too. Even now, my disposable income is pretty limited. We all have to make sacrifices. Rent games? Buy bargain-bin games? Borrow them from friends?

Why do you get to have things for free? You don't. You either save up for them, find another way, or go without. You aren't entitled to get something for free just because you want to.

For some reason, many gamers feel that they have to play every awesome new game, or supposedly awesome AAA title. This is just another pathetic attempt for pirates to rationalize their immoral actions.

Also, it's called Steam. They have awesome sales all the time, if you just wait a few months after release.

John Funk:
I was a college student once too. Even now, my disposable income is pretty limited. We all have to make sacrifices. Rent games? Buy bargain-bin games? Borrow them from friends?

Why do you get to have things for free? You don't. You either save up for them, find another way, or go without. You aren't entitled to get something for free just because you want to.

Did you even read my post? I did save up for games. But when I switched to just playing my own games competitively and not trying new games through piracy, I basically stopped buying games altogether. My piracy was not costing anyone money, nor was it done simply because I wanted to grab up as many games as I could. My whole point was that it was the only thing keeping me buying them.

Can't rent PC games, as far as I know (I don't own any consoles). Sometimes I do borrow things from friends, though I'm sure game producers don't like that much more than piracy. Me pirating a game vs. me borrowing a game basically amounted to the same thing: the developer not getting any money unless I was impressed enough with the "trial" to buy it myself. I don't know why you find one so unethical and the other so just.

You're right in that I'm not entitled to anything. But that wasn't the point. I wasn't saying I deserved those games, I was saying that realistically, as a busy and poor student, the only way I could keep up with games and get interested enough to buy them was downloading them first. I did not find it unethical at the time, and I still don't. You don't have to worry about me pirating things anymore; I haven't done it for at least 6 months. But at the same time, I also haven't purchased a game or payed a monthly fee in that time. In the eyes of some content owners, and people like you, what I'm doing now is more ethical and better for the industry than what I was doing before.

edthehyena:

John Funk:

G-Mang:

*snip*

I was a college student once too. Even now, my disposable income is pretty limited. We all have to make sacrifices. Rent games? Buy bargain-bin games? Borrow them from friends?

Why do you get to have things for free? You don't. You either save up for them, find another way, or go without. You aren't entitled to get something for free just because you want to.

For some reason, many gamers feel that they have to play every awesome new game, or supposedly awesome AAA title. This is just another pathetic attempt for pirates to rationalize their immoral actions.

Also, it's called Steam. They have awesome sales all the time, if you just wait a few months after release.

Exactly.

You don't get everything you want because WAAHHHH I WANT IT NOW. For Christ's sake, people went without for the whole of human civilization. Kids with noses pressed up against the windows of stores looking at the thing they want and saving their allowance. They don't get a Red Ryder BB Gun away because they think they're entitled to it.

It's a rationalization, and it's total bunk.

G-Mang:

John Funk:
I was a college student once too. Even now, my disposable income is pretty limited. We all have to make sacrifices. Rent games? Buy bargain-bin games? Borrow them from friends?

Why do you get to have things for free? You don't. You either save up for them, find another way, or go without. You aren't entitled to get something for free just because you want to.

Did you even read my post? I did save up for games. But when I switched to just playing my own games competitively and not trying new games through piracy, I basically stopped buying games altogether. My piracy was not costing anyone money, nor was it done simply because I wanted to grab up as many games as I could. My whole point was that it was the only thing keeping me buying them.

Can't rent PC games, as far as I know (I don't own any consoles). Sometimes I do borrow things from friends, though I'm sure game producers don't like that much more than piracy. Me pirating a game vs. me borrowing a game basically amounted to the same thing: the developer not getting any money unless I was impressed enough with the "trial" to buy it myself. I don't know why you find one so unethical and the other so just.

You're right in that I'm not entitled to anything. But that wasn't the point. I wasn't saying I deserved those games, I was saying that realistically, as a busy and poor student, the only way I could keep up with games and get interested enough to buy them was downloading them first. I did not find it unethical at the time, and I still don't. You don't have to worry about me pirating things anymore; I haven't done it for at least 6 months. But at the same time, I also haven't purchased a game or payed a monthly fee in that time. In the eyes of some content owners, and people like you, what I'm doing now is more ethical and better for the industry than what I was doing before.

Yes, it is more ethical. People have the right to not buy something, as they have for the whole of human civilization. If you don't want to give someone your money, you don't have to (or if you can't).

But that doesn't mean you get their half of the economic transaction anyway.

And the difference between lending and pirating is that with lending, your friend is not playing the game. He just temporarily transferred ownership to you. Until you transfer it back, he can't play it. That makes all the difference in the world.

It's a cultural thing in the USA as well. I get surprised looks from people who 'stick it to the man' when I say I'm going to buy something.

So it's ingrained everywhere.

I used to pirate some games--It was honestly about 50-50 for buying/pirating, though too be fair I never bought all that much, maybe one or two a month. I rather grew out of it (possibly because the PS3 has no pirate option, forcing me to look to different avenues), preferring instead to play through it legally, opting for the renting option. Services like Gamefly are absolutely amazing to this end, as you can rent it for as long as you need/want, pay a small, easily managed fee a month, and play as many games as you can get in and out, plus or minus a day or so of there-and-back for the mail.

That said, I do think there's a limit of time for pirating games--pirating new stuff, where the game can still easily be found on shelves is theft. Running a ROM on an emulator of something the company doesn't sell anymore, and therefore earns no profit for anymore, is more akin to browsing a library. I'm uncertain of where I put very obscure titles in that system, because it feels like one of those things where the thought would be to say "if you can find it on a shelf, then get it that way, otherwise, browse the library".

I think pirates are selfish jerks who just want stuff for free

hmm, quite the contrary.

one can argue the fact that pirates are adopting a form of socialism/anarchism, usually there is more of a political reason behind pirating however people who do sell pirated martial are usually cheapskates.

in either the case, no matter how you feel about pirating, it will always happen.
pirates or copyright infringer's, have existed ever since the first man thought of copying off another person, this is not due being a "selfish jerk" but a matter of evolution where the cheater will try to gain the most while losing the least, greed is not one-dimensional as its there for a reason.

John Funk:

Exactly.

You don't get everything you want because WAAHHHH I WANT IT NOW. For Christ's sake, people went without for the whole of human civilization. Kids with noses pressed up against the windows of stores looking at the thing they want and saving their allowance. They don't get a Red Ryder BB Gun away because they think they're entitled to it.

It's a rationalization, and it's total bunk.

I agree with this sentiment a lot. I can't afford games at all, but I don't try some weak rationalising to justify pirating. I'll eat some 30 cent noodles for a few weeks, or I won't buy the damn thing. People really need to stop feeling entitled to every little thing that takes their fancy, you know, just because.

"That said, I do think there's a limit of time for pirating games--pirating new stuff, where the game can still easily be found on shelves is theft. Running a ROM on an emulator of something the company doesn't sell anymore, and therefore earns no profit for anymore, is more akin to browsing a library. I'm uncertain of where I put very obscure titles in that system, because it feels like one of those things where the thought would be to say "if you can find it on a shelf, then get it that way, otherwise, browse the library"."

That may have been more true in the past (though sales do not stop a month or two after release), but now that older games are available online (on steam, or old nintendo titles on the wii shop for example) you now have a method of providing money to people who own the intellectual property, so the "my money doesn't go to them anyway" excuse doesn't really apply in the majority of cases.

For all the judgement that the author is dealing out about Western piracy, I feel the article is sorely missing a judgement of Chinese piracy. Maybe it's (more) okay to pirate a game if there is no way you could normally afford it, it is not translated into your language, not sold in your country and piracy is the norm. It sure sounds like it.

The underlying truth is of course that for the developer there is exactly no difference between someone not buying a game and someone pirating that game. Both scenario's have the exact same outcome for the developer and one of them makes at least one person happy. You can call that a bullshit justification, but it is simply the truth. Whether someone spends their time playing outside or playing some video game, doesn't affect anyone but that person.

I still think piracy is bad as a general phenomenon, but it's evilness is often grossly exaggerated.

This story remind me of my home country in Vietnam. You're right, there is no point in combat piracy in countries like these because there's literally no game being release there. The only way to get these game is to pirate them, unless if you're rich - and speak english or another language.

I even remember those 'PS2 Cafe' where you can pay per hour to play on the consol. (Oh, good times...)

It's also very funny to see people already defending piracy in the first page.

Jordi:
For all the judgement that the author is dealing out about Western piracy, I feel the article is sorely missing a judgement of Chinese piracy. Maybe it's (more) okay to pirate a game if there is no way you could normally afford it, it is not translated into your language, not sold in your country and piracy is the norm. It sure sounds like it.

The underlying truth is of course that for the developer there is exactly no difference between someone not buying a game and someone pirating that game. Both scenario's have the exact same outcome for the developer and one of them makes at least one person happy. You can call that a bullshit justification, but it is simply the truth. Whether someone spends their time playing outside or playing some video game, doesn't affect anyone but that person.

I still think piracy is bad as a general phenomenon, but it's evilness is often grossly exaggerated.

The difference is, the developer is trying to sell the game to you in one case, whereas it's not even trying to sell the game over there. And maybe it shouldn't be. Maybe there's no point to it.

I love people here keep saying pirates are unethical instead of saying that pirates don't share typical ethical beliefs.

Pirate:
"I get what I want for free. I just take it. I don't care about some far off development team. I don't care if everyone downloads my hack and the development team goes under. There will always be more development teams, because enough people still buy games. If this attitude pisses you off, tough titties. I don't care.
Catch me if you can, oh wait you can't possibly catch me and ALL the other video game pirates and movie pirates and music pirates on the internet."

John Funk:
You are taking something that someone spent time and money on, for free, when they have the right to receive money for their hard work.

I'd have to disagree with that a pirate is actually "taking" the game from the developers. If I "took" the game I'd have to get in their office, take the hard-drive/media containing the actual game, and then claim it as my own. A person could spend time and money to make a car that could get stolen, but anything that is digital these days are so easy to copy that implying the words "stolen" or "taking" confuses me. Trying to steal something that is abundant/easy to copy is like a person claiming they are stealing air or water, in my opinion.

However I do agree that because software is easy to copy that it is becoming an issue for developers, especially with China, and it should be something that has to be resolved. I think the problem is most people tend to think anything digital is an exclusive item--an economic term where an item is denied to consumers unless they pay for it. Obviously that is not true in China as you pointed out in your experience there. Offering other services with the product as you pointed out is a good work-around, though I don't know why they limit this just to multiplayer services. What if they sold add-ons to those games? Like more items/enemies or tutorials on how to make independent games from that game, similar to the editor for "Dragon Age"?

John Funk:
Why do you get to have things for free? You don't. You either save up for them, find another way, or go without. You aren't entitled to get something for free just because you want to.

Thank you.

I hate to use the old "you wouldn't steal a car" thing but, well, you wouldn't. Can't afford a car?

TOO FUCKING BAD

Welcome to the real world sonny, where things cost money and you are statistically a waste of space, your dreams mean nothing and you can't have everything you want. Try arguing that you can't afford your rent and see how long before they toss you out on your ass. Of course a lot of these people would probably take their game console before the actual important stuff.

The answer to this particular problem is for China to stop suppressing the value of their currency. Videogames would become easier to afford for Chinese because their currency would be worth more, free of pegs to the U.S. dollar.

MaltesePigeon:
I love people here keep saying pirates are unethical instead of saying that pirates don't share typical ethical beliefs.

Pirate:
"I get what I want for free. I just take it. I don't care about some far off development team. I don't care if everyone downloads my hack and the development team goes under. There will always be more development teams, because enough people still buy games. If this attitude pisses you off, tough titties. I don't care.
Catch me if you can, oh wait you can't possibly catch me and ALL the other video game pirates and movie pirates and music pirates on the internet."

Other pirate:
"I'm not sure if game X is going to be any good. I want to vote with my wallet, like the anti-piracy people are saying, but I really want to vote based on how much I like the game, rather than how much I like their marketing campaign, so I'm just going to try it out first."

Another pirate (possibly Chinese):
"I can't realistically buy game X. It won't affect anyone if I play it anyway."

Yet another pirate:
"Data wants to be free!"

etc.

You're right, there are many different kinds of people with slightly different ethics.

Voltano:

John Funk:
You are taking something that someone spent time and money on, for free, when they have the right to receive money for their hard work.

I'd have to disagree with that a pirate is actually "taking" the game from the developers. If I "took" the game I'd have to get in their office, take the hard-drive/media containing the actual game, and then claim it as my own. A person could spend time and money to make a car that could get stolen, but anything that is digital these days are so easy to copy that implying the words "stolen" or "taking" confuses me. Trying to steal something that is abundant/easy to copy is like a person claiming they are stealing air or water, in my opinion.

However I do agree that because software is easy to copy that it is becoming an issue for developers, especially with China, and it should be something that has to be resolved. I think the problem is most people tend to think anything digital is an exclusive item--an economic term where an item is denied to consumers unless they pay for it. Obviously that is not true in China as you pointed out in your experience there. Offering other services with the product as you pointed out is a good work-around, though I don't know why they limit this just to multiplayer services. What if they sold add-ons to those games? Like more items/enemies or tutorials on how to make independent games from that game, similar to the editor for "Dragon Age"?

This "it's not really stealing" Arguement is bullshit.

Your stealing. You are taking a product and/or service, for nothing. You are denying them a sale and partaking of their product, without paying them. Even if you go back and buy it later (because WAHHH SOMETIMES I BUY THE GAMES I PIRATE), your cocking up their profit margin which affects wether or not a great game gets a sequel, wether or not the studio stays open, who gets paid, and wether or not a genre or trend or attempt to innovate survives.

Mind you I do think Videogame Companies need to learn to make their products smarter, not BIGGER AND BURLIER to cut costs, but piracy is an equal if not greater problem then graphical markup.

I used to pirate, mostly games I couldn't find legitimatly. Now I have steam.

Steam has games. For cheap. Steam, Gamestop, Blockbuster. Learn them. Love them. BUY USED/RENT/ON SALE.

I bought Metro 2033 for half price. Thanks, Steam! Good 20 bucks too.

Reminds me of the tales about piracy in Brazil (Yes, that's the same article, published twice for some reason). It certainly makes sense that the videogame industry, primarily aimed at us spoiled Western bastards (and the Japanese, but only because that's where many games come from), would have a hard time adapting to circumstances in not-so-rich nations. And with little reason not to pirate games and virtually no enforcement of copyright laws, there's no incentive for pirates in such nations to stop pirating.

Still, I don't think the rules are in any way different for those people than they are for you and me. I have occasionally commented on the rather extreme sense of entitlement many gamers seem to have, which is in my eyes the #1 reason people pirate games. But if little Billy is a selfish jerk for pirating games he can't afford to buy, why would little Zhuang be any different for doing exactly the same thing? Sure, his circumstances are probably worse than Billy's, but games aren't some inalienable human right. No one's going to say "sure piracy is wrong, but this game costs more than your family earns in a month so it's somehow less bad to steal it". This also means that there's no reason why publishers should "Skimp on fancy packaging to keep distribution and production costs down, just get the disc in stores, and sell it for 60 RMB ($8.78)." Since there's no way to compete with the criminals under the current circumstances, there's simply no reason for publishers to go anywhere near the areas where piracy is such a huge business. Unless they can keep the pirates from pirating (which is pretty much impossible), the best choice a publisher can make is simply not to even try.

Perhaps it's unfortunate, but it's not a publisher's task to make sure as many people as possible get to enjoy videogames at a reasonable price. It's to make money. Everyone should decide for themselves what price is reasonable (and of course, for most people that decision will depend heavily on their income), but if the price is higher than what you find acceptable then piracy shouldn't be the obvious alternative, no matter how low your income is.

Resistance is futile.

also

Setsuhen:
Strangely enough, I live in a tiny island (Malta, but you've probably never heard of it) and it's not an underdeveloped country, yet piracy is the thing around here. ALL the people I know have at least pirated ONE thing in their life, be it music, video games, films, etc. But no one ever thinks about how piracy is bad or what not. It's actually a way of life for us.

Same here, and I live in Iowa.

Onyx Oblivion:
Ahh...The R4.

My aunt bought one for her son. I'm tempted to steal it and then break it everytime I see it.

hmmmmmmm, I was wondering what to get little bro for his bday.

I've been a long time lurker in The Escapist but I had to respond to this

TsunamiWombat:

This "it's not really stealing" Arguement is bullshit.

Actually, it's most certainly not bullshit. There is a reason why the courts in the US have a different set of rules for theft and copyright infringement.

Going around repeating the MPAA, RIAA and BSA sermon about "stealing" a movie or a song or software and liking file sharing with shoplifting and grand theft auto does nothing but further dilute the conversation and obfuscates it with a whole lot of FUD that in the end will only serve to play into Big Media's trap, which is to further legislate "tougher copyright" just to protect a very specific corner of the industry by stomping on consumers rights.

Big Faceless Corporation would love it for you to be on their side so that you can further propagate this idea that "dirty pirates" are killing kittens and destroying the lively hood of hard working artist, that way you won't see it coming when they get their friends in government to go along with shit like the DMCA, Selective Output Control and ACTA (if you don't know what these are, google them).

Disclosure: I'm pro copyright, but not in the ironfisted way the MPAA, RIAA and BSA want

 Pages 1 2 3 4 5 6 NEXT

Reply to Thread

Log in or Register to Comment
Have an account? Login below:
With Facebook:Login With Facebook
or
Username:  
Password:  
  
Not registered? To sign up for an account with The Escapist:
Register With Facebook
Register With Facebook
or
Register for a free account here