Red Dead Revival?

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Red Dead Revival?

Beat Red Dead? Want more cowboys? MovieBob can help.

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No list of westerns is complete without "The Magnificent Seven".

Actually, just cut out the middle man and make "Seven Samurai" an honorary western. And "Zulu".

Pretty nice list once again. Your point about Deconstruction of the genre almost ruining it was interesting to say the least, though I think it's a necessary evil. I found that the westerns that WERE deconstructed are the greatest examples of the genre.

Also to add to the list, I would also include The Treasure of the Sierra Madre, McCabe and Mrs. Miller, Dead Man, and the Proposition.

Love Westerns (I'm 23). Pale rider is a notable abscence for me but then thats a lot of Eastwood. I'm also a huge 'Once upon a time in the west' fan because that harmonica is wonderfully haunting and athmospheric. I could go on with my Favourite westerns but will reseve judgement on these until I have seen them all.

EDIT: Ah Screw it here are the others

Magnificant Seven, its not the greatest but the cast and individual characters do pull the plot along well (and being based on a Japanese folk tale helps)

Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid great gang film in the late days of the west. 2 friends against the might of the Rangers. Charming and fun without being overly serious

I add my voice to the Dollars Trilogy as the best constructed in terms of setting and mood as long as you can get past the dubbing of all the foreign actors.

Unforgiven and High Plains Drifter are also top notch but then I am a bit of a Eastwood fanboy!

one Question, there is a film with John Wayne where he and a friend travel accross miles to return a mexicn lady to her husban, only to set her free again when they realise how much of a dick he is, can someone get me the name of this film!

I'd also add Rio Bravo, Howard Hawks's slightly lighter take on the genre (some of the best and snappiest dialogue I've ever seen, and it has Dean Martin and Ricky Nelson singing a duet while Walter Brennan makes hilarious running commentary on the song they picked).

Also, The Magnificent Seven, the "other" Kurosawa adaptation (and I doubt I need to tell most people here what the most famous one is...)

What, no "The Proposition" or "3:10 to Yuma" (remake or original)? or "The Magnificent Seven"?

Definitely like "The Wild Bunch"'s inclusion on that list though, phenomenal film.

Also, let me just say that Clint Eastwood as Two-Face would have been freakin' sweet.

Is there no love for Dances With Wolves?

Is it safe to assume that it isn't on list because it falls into the same category as Unforgiven - a western that's all about de-constructing the mythology of westerns.

Good list though Bob

PedroSteckecilo:
What, no "The Proposition" or "3:10 to Yuma" (remake or original)? or "The Magnificent Seven"?

Definitely like "The Wild Bunch"'s inclusion on that list though, phenomenal film.

There are too many good Western movies for one list!

Of course some aren't going to make it in.

I gotta see some of these... I've seens a few westerns and loved them, but never got around to seeing the ones everyone hails as the best. Maybe now I have a "to-do" list.

True Grit, dammit! It has John Wayne blasting fools while holding his horse's reins in his teeth! A remake is out this winter directed by the Coen Bros and starring Jeff Bridges. And yes the Dollars Trilogy is probably the most awesome of the bunch.

Another reason westerns probably died out is due to HORRENDOUS saturation. Superhero movies might end up the same way if we're not careful

You forgot Dead Man.

The only western I ever liked.

Westerns are the shit! One of my favorite genres, and any movie with John Wayne or Clint Eastwood is instant win. bit upset there is no "The Magnificent Seven", but really, it would have took Bob almost 25 pages to go through them all.

No 'Once Upon a Time in the West' (Leone 1968), really? To my mind critical engagement with Westerns is very interesting. Speaking personally I could see a "Johnny Depp revival" (I presume you don't mean 'Dead Man' (Jarmusch 1996)). Has there been a 'pirates' revival or just a sucsessful franchise? I'm not aware of any pirate/swashbuckling films beyond Depp's nods to the camera ironic Captain Sparrow films. These films don't to me feel comparable to Flynn's adventures or 'The Crimson Pirate' they feel quite contrived in a post 70's/Post-Classical Hollywood way.

On a related note 'Singin in the Rain' (Kelly 1952) to me feels like a challenge to the innocence of cinema during the tail end of the 'studio era'.

That's a great list Bob. I agree that Dances with Wolves should not be on this list, but I really don't think you can get away without at least one of Kevin Costner's movies. Personally, I would replace Tombstone with Open Range. That movie is a great western in much the same vein as Unforgiven and shot like the older westerns from the 70s.

Oh, and what about Young Guns... j/k ;-)

I need to watch more Westerns =/

This seems to be a very exciting list of movies. Hopefully I might remember to look at this list in the future and get some copies of these movies, especially The Wild Bunch and High Noon. Of those on the list, those two sounded to coolest to me.

Is it too far of a stretch to say No Country for Old Men was a western (even though it takes place in 1960's or 1970's Texas)? Because I really liked that movie, and I wanna be able to say I have seen at least ONE Western....

Red Dead Redemption defiantly sparked my curiosity for the genre and since then I have began watching and seeking out more westerns, needless to say, thanks for some of the recommendations.

scifidownbeat:
This seems to be a very exciting list of movies. Hopefully I might remember to look at this list in the future and get some copies of these movies, especially The Wild Bunch and High Noon. Of those on the list, those two sounded to coolest to me.

The Dollars series is also worth checking out just for the musical scores alone.

I agree with others that the omission of The Magnificent Seven is regrettable since it is fantastic, taking The Seven Samurai and adding enough to make it distinct enough to be its own movie.

I also recommend The Proposition as a great foreign Western. Ray Winstone, Danny Huston, Guy Pearce, Emily Watson and the ever fantastic John Hurt all put in a great performance (especially Hurt who steals the show), the setting is lovably bleak, music is pitch perfect and the ending was very hard for me to watch the first time around.

Finally, everyone should see at least the first season of Deadwood, which isn't so much a western as it is a wild west drama. It also features great writing and characters, finds a nice blend of drama and comedy, and great acting, particularly Ian McShane. I can't say anything for the other seasons of the show but the first is absolutely fantastic.

I'm surprised that the magnificent 7 isn't there. You could argue that its just a remake of the 7 Samurai but a fist full of dollars is almost a shot for shot remake of Yojimbo. Also I have a great fondness for James Garners comedy westerns. Both support your local sheriff and support your local gunfighter make me laugh every time.

Acalla:
That's a great list Bob. I agree that Dances with Wolves should not be on this list, but I really don't think you can get away without at least one of Kevin Costner's movies. Personally, I would replace Tombstone with Open Range. That movie is a great western in much the same vein as Unforgiven and shot like the older westerns from the 70s.

So true - Open Range is the best Western of the last 10 years, and it's a real genre piece: slow buildup of tension, mourning for a lost golden age, climactic shootout, tearjerker romantic subplot.

I'm so glad you mentioned Tombstone! My father and I watch Tombstone all the time. It's one of our all time favorite movies to watch together. It's full of great quotes too!

And did anyone else like 3:10 To Yuma? The one with Christian Bale and Russel Crow? I think it might have been a re-make. Ehh I don't know. I DO know that some younger people still appreciate the Western. Me being one of them. OH and Appaloosa. That was good too :D

I think they could have made a game about space pirates stealing warp drives and it would have still sold just as well. It's a sandbox by Rockstar North, that's all they needed to use as marketing.

npath:
No list of westerns is complete without "The Magnificent Seven".

Actually, just cut out the middle man and make "Seven Samurai" an honorary western. And "Zulu".

Already ninja'd, no maginificent seven? whats wrong with you bob

This list has The Searchers on it. 'Nuff said.

Still, it's hard not to love Silverado.

scifidownbeat:
This seems to be a very exciting list of movies. Hopefully I might remember to look at this list in the future and get some copies of these movies, especially The Wild Bunch and High Noon. Of those on the list, those two sounded to coolest to me.

Is it too far of a stretch to say No Country for Old Men was a western (even though it takes place in 1960's or 1970's Texas)? Because I really liked that movie, and I wanna be able to say I have seen at least ONE Western....

You know? That's an excellent, modern addition to a western list. In fact, in the vein of Bob's thread, if Unforgiven was the funeral, No Country could be the wake.

Once Upon A Time in the West.

One of the best westerns you will ever see.

the December King:

scifidownbeat:
This seems to be a very exciting list of movies. Hopefully I might remember to look at this list in the future and get some copies of these movies, especially The Wild Bunch and High Noon. Of those on the list, those two sounded to coolest to me.

Is it too far of a stretch to say No Country for Old Men was a western (even though it takes place in 1960's or 1970's Texas)? Because I really liked that movie, and I wanna be able to say I have seen at least ONE Western....

You know? That's an excellent, modern addition to a western list. In fact, in the vein of Bob's thread, if Unforgiven was the funeral, No Country could be the wake.

Nah, not a western. Missing too many things from the genre.

Bob, we agree on a lot here! (Yes, I know, you don't really care about some random dude's opinion on the forum, but I'm excited that our common ground is Westerns).

I do, however, think your list is lacking two very important films and one lesser film. The two big ones are Magnificent Seven (as said before), which I think was an incredibly strong influence on Red Dead Redemption.
The next is The Big Country. Gregory Peck is an eastern with a strong sense of honor trying to get by in the rough and tumble west. It's simply fantastic and also a strong Red Dead influence. You only need to look at how the cut scenes were shot and the landscape laid out to see the connection.

Finally, maybe not one of the greatest, but certainly a favorite of mine and one that really captures the whole spirit of survival in the west is Duel At Diablo. Sure, there's a bit of a Calvary vs. Indians thing in it, but it's really about how tough it is in the west and how you have to deal with people you wouldn't because they are skilled. James Garner is amazing, Sidney Poitier is in top form (and he's always fantastic), and the Apache are really portrayed as more than faceless bad guys. It's, in my mind, the best film to capture the sense of honor and redemption that Red Dead Redemption was going for.

Out of all the Westerns on your list, I have only seen "The Wild Bunch".

I had a time (about the last five years) where I couldn't watch Westerns. I don't know why, but they weren't my thing, never have been. Recently, I've been going back to watch older pictures (trying to expand on my movies history and overall appreciation of Cinema) and my father happened to buy a copy of "The Wild Bunch" at a garage sale years ago.

I have to say that that movie made me a believer of the Western Genre. I bounce around in it now ("Seraphim Falls" was the last Western I have watched as of late. Liam Neeson and Pierce Brosnan make for some interesting cowboys) but I have more respect for the film style alone than anything else.

jthm:

the December King:

scifidownbeat:
This seems to be a very exciting list of movies. Hopefully I might remember to look at this list in the future and get some copies of these movies, especially The Wild Bunch and High Noon. Of those on the list, those two sounded to coolest to me.

Is it too far of a stretch to say No Country for Old Men was a western (even though it takes place in 1960's or 1970's Texas)? Because I really liked that movie, and I wanna be able to say I have seen at least ONE Western....

You know? That's an excellent, modern addition to a western list. In fact, in the vein of Bob's thread, if Unforgiven was the funeral, No Country could be the wake.

Nah, not a western. Missing too many things from the genre.

Although I agree that in the strictest sense it is not a western, it does make reference in narrative constantly to the times when outlaws and sherrifs did have gunfights, and the sherrif is supposed to be from a line of sherrifs, as I recall. I see where you're coming from, though.

Appaloosa was a good movie. If not without much of a real gripping plot, more of a greek tragedy really. It was touted as a artsy film which i guess is y it didn't do well in the box office.

Truly a genre I've never had any interest in. Even when I was a kid I don't recall ever playing "Cowboys and Indians." Perhaps it's a Canadian thing?

Once upon a time in west? WHY BOB, WHY!?!?!? It's easily one of the best Westerns of all time. Well, okay, it's not a traditional cowboy flick Lucky Luke style with the hero riding of into the setting sun but neither are a lot of the movies on your list.

Make a second list with all the Westerns you've missed on this list.

Bob, I think your list could use a few more contemporary examples. Red Dead Redemption touched on a lot of issues like the death of the west through modernity, Mexican revolutions, criminal posses, post civil war issues (maybe not high on the list but still present), treasure hunting, the search for gold etc. I think a decent western, along with conveying a narrative in relation to the characters also establishes a troubled and unstable world that is the eternal symbol of the west. I know everyone else feels something similar to me but as we say in Texas, "when your fixin to speak, it's best to speak." So here goes:

3:10 to Yuma (2007 film)
A Civil War vet seeks to raise money to save his family's ranch from a drought in Arizona. The only way to get the money is escort a notorious outlaw to a prison train while his gang hunts him down. Christian Bale's performance isn't really what makes the movie but the dialogue shared between him and Russel Crow's character is intriguing none the less.

Deadwood (2004-2006 TV series)
Set in the Black Hills of what is now South Dakota. The show forcefully tells the story of the Deadwood camp and their affairs. A wonderful and diverse cast along with solid performances, the dialogue and amazing set design really make this series appealing. True this isn't the most historically accurate piece, but then again this is meant to be a form of entertainment. The writers bring a contemporary feel to a wonderful bunch of old stories.

Thats really it but one more old movie should be added:

My Darling Clementine (1946 film)
This movie looks at history and simply goes "feh". It's wrong at just about every turn and it doesn't care. Why? Because Henry Fonda and Victor Mature know how to tell a good story.

A bit of constructive criticism never hurt no one. I'm out.

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