Red Dead Revival?

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AvsJoe:
Let's see... nope, nope, nope, no, nope, no, no, yes, nope, no, nope, no, and no. I have only seen one of these films: For a Few Dollars More, and I disliked it. I very much dislike the genre but I assume it's because most of the westerns I've watched were bottom-of-the-barrel stuff. I have to see Unforgiven, Hang 'Em High, Stagecoach, Good Bad and Ugly, and Tombstone one day but I doubt I'll see many more.

That's a real pity, you've watched easily the worst of the three. For a Few Dollars More is the trilogy's weakest link, I can't stand it myself. It's only worth watching to pad out The Man With No Name's adventures and to give context to a couple of flashbacks in The Good The Bad & The Ugly. Seriously, you could just as easily watch The Good The Bad & The Ugly by itself as it's strong enough (and long enough) to stand on it's own, particularly if the genre doesn't specially appeal to you.

Butch Cassidy & The Sundance Kid would also be good for someone not really in to Westerns. Obviously because it's such a damn classic but also because I found it trots along at a brisker pace than average and the action and dialogue are a lot of fun.

Moviebob, I'd absolutely love to see your recommendations for either classic adventure films or the epics. Or both.

My expirience with Western is limited to Lucky Luke and a very few movies (like Maverick for instance)

I have to agree with previous posts. "The Magnificent Seven" being left out is a shame. Yul Brynner and Steve McQueen teamed up. Can't get any better than that.

The reason "Once Upon a time in the West" was left out is because it is another Sergio Leone movie and he directed all the dollar trilogy movies. But man, is that a good movie with great casting, directing and writing.

Best showdown in movie history! You could feel the tension in the air because Sergio did such a great job of building up the scene.

"Did you bring a horse for me?"

*Laughs*"Looks like we're shy one horse"

"You brought two too many"

Watch opening scene on youtube. It's epic!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bW-jSa9_k3M

I love westerns. I have seen every big budget Western made in the last 15 years.

I have seen everything on the list as well.

I would have added, "the Sons of Katie Elder," or its modern day remake, "4 Brothers" to the list. Then again, I can make a pretty good argument that Gran Torino is a modern update of "High Noon."

Stiffkittin:

AvsJoe:
Let's see... nope, nope, nope, no, nope, no, no, yes, nope, no, nope, no, and no. I have only seen one of these films: For a Few Dollars More, and I disliked it. I very much dislike the genre but I assume it's because most of the westerns I've watched were bottom-of-the-barrel stuff. I have to see Unforgiven, Hang 'Em High, Stagecoach, Good Bad and Ugly, and Tombstone one day but I doubt I'll see many more.

That's a real pity, you've watched easily the worst of the three. For a Few Dollars More is the trilogy's weakest link, I can't stand it myself. It's only worth watching to pad out The Man With No Name's adventures and to give context to a couple of flashbacks in The Good The Bad & The Ugly. Seriously, you could just as easily watch The Good The Bad & The Ugly by itself as it's strong enough (and long enough) to stand on it's own, particularly if the genre doesn't specially appeal to you.

Butch Cassidy & The Sundance Kid would also be good for someone not really in to Westerns. Obviously because it's such a damn classic but also because I found it trots along at a brisker pace than average and the action and dialogue are a lot of fun.

I've seen and enjoyed Butch Cassidy and The Sundance Kid; it's probably my favourite one unless El Mariachi counts as a western. It was a fun little movie, very much unlike most others in the genre.

The Searchers sucked my balls. Sergio Leone is where it's at.

AvsJoe:

Stiffkittin:

AvsJoe:
Let's see... nope, nope, nope, no, nope, no, no, yes, nope, no, nope, no, and no. I have only seen one of these films: For a Few Dollars More, and I disliked it. I very much dislike the genre but I assume it's because most of the westerns I've watched were bottom-of-the-barrel stuff. I have to see Unforgiven, Hang 'Em High, Stagecoach, Good Bad and Ugly, and Tombstone one day but I doubt I'll see many more.

That's a real pity, you've watched easily the worst of the three. For a Few Dollars More is the trilogy's weakest link, I can't stand it myself. It's only worth watching to pad out The Man With No Name's adventures and to give context to a couple of flashbacks in The Good The Bad & The Ugly. Seriously, you could just as easily watch The Good The Bad & The Ugly by itself as it's strong enough (and long enough) to stand on it's own, particularly if the genre doesn't specially appeal to you.

Butch Cassidy & The Sundance Kid would also be good for someone not really in to Westerns. Obviously because it's such a damn classic but also because I found it trots along at a brisker pace than average and the action and dialogue are a lot of fun.

I've seen and enjoyed Butch Cassidy and The Sundance Kid; it's probably my favourite one unless El Mariachi counts as a western. It was a fun little movie, very much unlike most others in the genre.

That's true, it's definitely outside the mould of the classic western. Still it retains enough of the quintessential elements, like a passion for the setting and the themes of freedom and personal integrity. It's a decent entry level for those who don't normally go for the genre.

If you're interested at all maybe check out some of the more recent high quality films for starters. As others have said the 3:10 to Yuma remake was pretty good and a sound action piece. Also, if you have the patience for it, the slow boiling The Assassination of Jesse James by the Coward Robert Ford is tense and extremely rewarding with great use of the landscape/cinematography to set mood and atmosphere.

I'd definitely try and watch one or two more of Clint's earlier films before seeing Unforgiven though. The context they give his character in that film is worth it.

Stiffkittin:

AvsJoe:

Stiffkittin:

AvsJoe:
Let's see... nope, nope, nope, no, nope, no, no, yes, nope, no, nope, no, and no. I have only seen one of these films: For a Few Dollars More, and I disliked it. I very much dislike the genre but I assume it's because most of the westerns I've watched were bottom-of-the-barrel stuff. I have to see Unforgiven, Hang 'Em High, Stagecoach, Good Bad and Ugly, and Tombstone one day but I doubt I'll see many more.

That's a real pity, you've watched easily the worst of the three. For a Few Dollars More is the trilogy's weakest link, I can't stand it myself. It's only worth watching to pad out The Man With No Name's adventures and to give context to a couple of flashbacks in The Good The Bad & The Ugly. Seriously, you could just as easily watch The Good The Bad & The Ugly by itself as it's strong enough (and long enough) to stand on it's own, particularly if the genre doesn't specially appeal to you.

Butch Cassidy & The Sundance Kid would also be good for someone not really in to Westerns. Obviously because it's such a damn classic but also because I found it trots along at a brisker pace than average and the action and dialogue are a lot of fun.

I've seen and enjoyed Butch Cassidy and The Sundance Kid; it's probably my favourite one unless El Mariachi counts as a western. It was a fun little movie, very much unlike most others in the genre.

That's true, it's definitely outside the mould of the classic western. Still it retains enough of the quintessential elements, like a passion for the setting and the themes of freedom and personal integrity. It's a decent entry level for those who don't normally go for the genre.

If you're interested at all maybe check out some of the more recent high quality films for starters. As others have said the 3:10 to Yuma remake was pretty good and a sound action piece. Also, if you have the patience for it, the slow boiling The Assassination of Jesse James by the Coward Robert Ford is tense and extremely rewarding with great use of the landscape/cinematography to set mood and atmosphere.

I'd definitely try and watch one or two more of Clint's earlier films before seeing Unforgiven though. The context they give his character in that film is worth it.

Thanks for the heads up. I skipped Yuma because I was broke and I had no interest in Assassination but to make up for it I watched Ed Harris' Appaloosa, which I enjoyed.

Which Eastwood-directed films should I watch? I've only seen his newer stuff: Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil, Space Cowboys, Gran Torino, Mystic River, and Invictus. I've heard good things about The Outlaw Josie Wales and High Plains Drifter; I had previously bought both of them on VHS but lost them in a move before I could watch them.

AvsJoe:
[quote="Stiffkittin" post="6.231269.8128336"]
Which Eastwood-directed films should I watch? I've only seen his newer stuff: Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil, Space Cowboys, Gran Torino, Mystic River, and Invictus. I've heard good things about The Outlaw Josie Wales and High Plains Drifter; I had previously bought both of them on VHS but lost them in a move before I could watch them.

High Plains Drifter will leave you, at least until the third act, with an open mouth. I watched the Dirty Harry series countless times and love Heartbreak Ride to death but i've never seen Eastwood so ruthless - so purely not-giving-a-fuck/taking whatever and whoever he wants.
Pale Rider is also a great movie - even more if you like the whole "Preacher with a Colt Peacemaker" theme and the bible references.

I never knew High Plains Drifter had an overtone of horror to it. I'm much more interested in checking it out now.

And i realize it may not be a "modern classic" or anything, but I seriously enjoyed 3:10 to Yuma. Anything to watch actors as good as Crowe and Bale scowl at each other.

AvsJoe:
Thanks for the heads up. I skipped Yuma because I was broke and I had no interest in Assassination but to make up for it I watched Ed Harris' Appaloosa, which I enjoyed.

Which Eastwood-directed films should I watch? I've only seen his newer stuff: Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil, Space Cowboys, Gran Torino, Mystic River, and Invictus. I've heard good things about The Outlaw Josie Wales and High Plains Drifter; I had previously bought both of them on VHS but lost them in a move before I could watch them.

Well Clint-starring I'd try and see The Good the Bad and the Ugly for starters as it really is impressive, if a trifle long. A Fistful of Dollars is only really required viewing to be able to weigh in on the Kurosawa ripoff controversy. My opinion is it doesn't do anything The Good, the Bad and the Ugly doesn't do better; still Yojimbo is a classic for a reason so Fistful does have a tight and exciting narrative of it's own and isn't all that long...

The Imp:
High Plains Drifter will leave you, at least until the third act, with an open mouth. I watched the Dirty Harry series countless times and love Heartbreak Ride to death but i've never seen Eastwood so ruthless - so purely not-giving-a-fuck/taking whatever and whoever he wants.

This is totally true, if I had to choose between The Outlaw Josey Wales and High Plains Drifter I'd have to go with the consensus and agree that the former is the stronger film. It's pretty hard to dig a movie where the fact the protagonist is a complete and utter bastard is only slightly alleviated by the townspeople not being much better. If you stick around for it the supernatural subplot gives a decent payoff but will still leave you feeling a little uncomfortable about what took place. Still, I love this film too. It's one of the most unique westerns you'll see and what he gets the townsfolk to do to prepare for the bandits... fantastic.

I found Pale Rider a mixed bag. It's a far more modern film than the others and it shows. Budgets for full scale western sets were clearly more limited in the 80s. The acting is a little wooden, some of the character shifts are a bit abrupt and it lets it's best reveal go too early. That said though it has an awesome premise, solid characters, the dialogue is well written and the ass-kickery is satisfying. It's one of those films worth watching because you can practically see the brilliant film just below the mediocre, slightly cheesy offering we got. It really wouldn't have taken much for this to be a classic.

I have a soft spot for westerns, chief among them the truly epic Once Upon A Time in the West. Even if you've never seen it, you've probably heard references to it and its characters. It's a very simple revenge tale and easily one of the best movies ever filmed.

crotalidian:

EDIT: Ah Screw it here are the others

Magnificant Seven, its not the greatest but the cast and individual characters do pull the plot along well (and being based on a Japanese folk tale helps)

Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid great gang film in the late days of the west. 2 friends against the might of the Rangers. Charming and fun without being overly serious

Agreed. These are both great, and BCASK is one of my top ten movies period. Its essentially a buddy picture, with some of the best chemistry between two actors I've ever seen. Not to mention that nearly every line is quotable in its own right.

BTW, if anyone hasnt seen it, don't read an overview. The ending is pretty damn memorable and worth enjoying without it being spoiled.

I need to watch 7 again. Its a great film but I was a little young to fully appreciate it. Steve Mcqueen rocks my face off.

npath:
No list of westerns is complete without "The Magnificent Seven".

Actually, just cut out the middle man and make "Seven Samurai" an honorary western. And "Zulu".

exactly what i thought before i read this, and was saying as soon as i finshed reading

the December King:

jthm:

the December King:

scifidownbeat:
This seems to be a very exciting list of movies. Hopefully I might remember to look at this list in the future and get some copies of these movies, especially The Wild Bunch and High Noon. Of those on the list, those two sounded to coolest to me.

Is it too far of a stretch to say No Country for Old Men was a western (even though it takes place in 1960's or 1970's Texas)? Because I really liked that movie, and I wanna be able to say I have seen at least ONE Western....

You know? That's an excellent, modern addition to a western list. In fact, in the vein of Bob's thread, if Unforgiven was the funeral, No Country could be the wake.

Nah, not a western. Missing too many things from the genre.

Although I agree that in the strictest sense it is not a western, it does make reference in narrative constantly to the times when outlaws and sherrifs did have gunfights, and the sherrif is supposed to be from a line of sherrifs, as I recall. I see where you're coming from, though.

If I were pretentious enough to coin a term (or if I were moviebob) I might call it a "post-western". Not saying it wasn't a great film, just not a western.

Dammit. Now I have even more movies to watch...

Only western I've ever seen was '3:10 to Yuma', and that wasn't even period. Great.

I quite like Hang em High and if your feeling in the mood for something light and fun try
Cat Ballou which is a musical/comedy western with Jane Fonda back when she was smoking hot and Lee Marvin it's just really entertaining

Does Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid not count as a Western these days?

I note that it would be impossible to fit all the best Western movies in a 3 page article, but I can't really argue with anything you included here. I doubt I could make a better starting point for Western Noobies.

just watched high planes drifter

amazing movie... the end was awesome, and you gotta love clint eastwood

Here's one that everyone's seemed to miss. Deadman -Jonny Depp and Gary Farmer. Contains almost everything necessary to be a classic western movie. I honestly think this can stand against some of the greats of western cinema.

Mmm would have thought The Proposition would have made the list. While I'm sure technically it isn't a western... I think it captured the feel of a western and is up there at the top of my list as far as the 'Western' genre goes. Also on my top ten list for movies.

Brilliant, dark and chilling film. Well acted by the cast, well written by Nick Cave and beautifully directed by John Hillcoat, a director who's gone a little under-acknowledged by most which is a shame given the quality of his few films. Also the film as one of the most chilling and beautiful scores that sets the whole movie, which was also written by Nick Cave along with Warren Ellis.

I think it's a crime that such a film is so under acknowledged by even western fans never mind the general public. I guess it's a little dark for their taste. Though Bob didn't seem to like Hillcoat's other film "The Road" so maybe he's just not a fan.

Still I can't recommend the film enough. I love this film above the other westerns I've watched. I know I don't have an internet show and probably no reason for anyone to trust my judgement or recommendations but I recommend it none the less.

Edit: Thinking of RDR... I'm sure that game took some influence from the proposition. I mean, the whole kill your mates to save your family bit seemed similar to the whole kill your brother to save the other one in Proposition. Also when meeting with his former leader and friend... there relationship seemed similar to Charlie and Arthur Burns. Though the game took influences from the spaghetti westerns... I'm sure the game also referenced The Proposition and Unforgiven here and there.

PedroSteckecilo:
What, no "The Proposition" or "3:10 to Yuma" (remake or original)? or "The Magnificent Seven"?

Definitely like "The Wild Bunch"'s inclusion on that list though, phenomenal film.

3:10 to Yuma for sure. What an amazing movie.

Aw... no Blazing Saddles? Haha.
Anyway, good choice on Stagecoach, saw that at the top of the list and I was satisfied. Can't go wrong with picking the movie that brought the Fords together.

My Name is Nobody

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