273: Confessions of a GameStop Employee - Part One

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I can't wait to hear about trade in's and what the deal is with used dvd's. My one Gamestop moment is when I purchased a copy of The Warriors for Xbox because my PS2 had broken down and I was foolish enough to not ask if it was 360 compatible but I thought some time later that if I asked the employee who helped me and the manager based on Scott's article would most likely tell me they don't know. That Gamestop is closed btw.

Thanks for sharing. It's interesting for me, I simply don't care about shrink wrap, and never really noticed it before-although I've bought new boxes from GameStop with the wrap still on. Maybe only for pre-orders though?

Here in Rhode Island, it's very hard to get GameStop jobs, especially post-EB.I know several experienced retailers who have been rejected, gamers, college students, etc.

On the other hand, it's nice to see and talk to people who know what they're doing.

The problem with TFA is that, contrary to "Ben's" opinion, Gamestop doesn't need to open games. They only need to have enough empty cases to cover the shelves, and can then swap out box art as is necessary. Imagine that, a way to have only a tiny number of "spare" game cases in the back of the store (5-10, to replace damaged display cases), and never open a new game.

I don't know what kind of thinking leads to "They'd need to keep one display box for every single game ever produced," but that's just idiotic.

Gutting USED games is fine, gutting NEW games is not.

That's odd, the Gamestops in Wisconsin don't gut their games; in fact, this article was first time I've ever heard of this situation. Though to be honest, I don't buy new games so perhaps local Gamestops do but it's passed my attention.

I dunno I guess for me it's been engraved into my heart that I need to unwrap my games. like they are presents and the shrink wrap and tape seals are the wrapping paper. New game smell.

In class so I skimmed through most of the posts (the replies, not the article, I read that one), but interesting view, not that far from what I imagined (I didn't expected a big 'storage' room, but at least bigger then what was described, around, I dunno, one lane about 10 feet long? depends on the size of the shop). My main and only grip with gutting, is not the fact the box is already open, the disk is still as new, no the thing that annoys me is that blasted price tag that leave so much glue residue on the box, it's just aesthetic for the box collection (it's pretty much all it comes up to) but it's a small annoyance, really small though, especially now that they changed the type of glue, i think, it shows up a lot less. I still prefer a sealed one if possible, to avoid the glue.
(quick note, I never went to a gamestop, just to EB games, which is pretty much it's equivalent)

As for the gutting thing. Unless you want all the games to be behind glass cases where you cant pick them up and read the box thats what your going to get. As for people complaining really what the hell is your problem. There is no difference between a game you take home and open the wrapper and one that was previously taken out and put in a sleve by an employee.

As for the hiring practice well obviously. Management or anybody else in the store what you said is pretty dam obvious. The only people who really apply to a place like gamestop are the kind of people who play games. They know that so its not a big criteria much less so then being able to push buttons and sell games.

Fenixius:

Adultratedhydra:
[...] i feel if someone spends an extra 3-5 bucks on a game to basicly insure it with us, we should not give them a "USED" game as a replacement. [...]

Wait, what? If someone puts EB's disk guarantee on their game, their mint copy of Halo Reach, and returns it with an Xbox Ring Burn, you'll replace it with a used copy of the game if one is available? Is that correct? Please tell me it's not, because that's ridiculous. New should be replaced with new, preowned with preowned.

As seems to be more common than I thought, I also work in the gaming retail industry. I don't have gutted games in my store. The shrinkage is pretty bad. I can see why other retailers do.

Overall, though, nothing to see here. Retail is boring. This is how we prevent theft. Let me know when the next post is here...

Last time I returned a game because it stopped working oddly enough on the 360 the clerk turned around grabbed a new shrink rapped one of the shelf behind the counter and tossed it to me. I know for a fact they had used ones in stock so thats not it either. From what I can tell from talking to the employees if there is no new copies left they will give you a used but if they have new then they give you a new copy.

Hell I returned mass effect 1 because it didnt work which I bought used and got a brand new copy, because they didnt have any used in stock.

RvLeshrac:
The problem with TFA is that, contrary to "Ben's" opinion, Gamestop doesn't need to open games. They only need to have enough empty cases to cover the shelves, and can then swap out box art as is necessary. Imagine that, a way to have only a tiny number of "spare" game cases in the back of the store (5-10, to replace damaged display cases), and never open a new game.

I don't know what kind of thinking leads to "They'd need to keep one display box for every single game ever produced," but that's just idiotic.

Gutting USED games is fine, gutting NEW games is not.

Your completely ignoring the fact that they dont have room to store all of those games. Do you honestly think your average gamestop has room for well over 1000+ game cases behind the counter, or do you want them to have to go into the back storeroom the size of a closet to get your game case everytime you buy one. How are they supposed to get the box art anyways? They would have to print off copies which would require a high quality photocopier and lots of money for ink and paper.

So yes they do actually have to open the game cases.

Thanks for not getting this person fired by revealing his/her identity in the rush to a brand-name sourced article.

interesting series, I will be keen to read the next installment. None of this is surprising to me, however. Retail sucks ass pretty much anywhere you work, managers are assclowns, and gamestop is evil.

Well, the fact that the managers mostly don't know anything about games might be why those busty beauties who know nothing about gaming seem to be staffing the campus Gamestop where I live.

Me: I'd like Mass Effect 2, please.

Clerk: *girl twirls hair* What?

Of course, I suppose even if geeky gamers were in charge, that would also lead to the same ladies being hired. So... I guess I'm going to have to spell out the game title to the girl clerk either way.

And then I'll have to point to the 200 copies of said game on the shelf behind her. *sigh* Such is life.

Let me think, people who think gutting is a bad plan, your imbeciles, it's neccasary to prevent theft, I also remember Games Radar doing a feature like this a while back, let me post the link... there: http://www.gamesradar.com/f/confessions-of-a-game-store-clerk/a-2007040314469812037

This is interesting, especially because I've actually asked the employees if they have a copy of a game that they didn't have up on the shelves... and they did.

I used to work on the videogames department of a Toys R Us store here in the UK.

We generally had a quantity of empty DVD cases and were provided with copy sleeves for titles to put in the cases for display purposes.

Officially we didn't have a gutting policy but sometimes sleeves for some titles wouldn't arrive or would arrive late.

In those cases I took it upon myself to gut the contents from the game stock, shrink wrapping the manual with the disc inside - not ideal but better than people thinking we were crap when they saw no boxes for a new game on the shelves when we had stock of the games.

I think the official line was that sales floor staff were supposed to approach every customer, thus giving the customer the chance to ask if we happen to have that title in stock.

In reality a lot of people just want to browse and if they don't see the title on the shelf they go - they don't want the hassle of dealing with a sales person, they just want to pick the game up and go.

Personally, I don't give a toss. I'm going to open it anyway. On the off chance the disc is scratched or something, I'll return it.

CynderBloc:
I'm in the 'I don't care if the wrap is off it as long as it isn't scratched camp'.

On another note though, the hiring process for the GAME store near me seems to be very strange. I recently applied for a position there (Sales Assistant, nothing fancy) and despite having nearly 10 years of face-to-face sales experience, they didn't even give me an interview.

Even more mind boggling is the guys they hired, 3 new guys, all about 18, all nervous as hell and without an ounce of gaming knowledge between them.

....Dammit I really wanted that job

Corporations would rather hire new people because they don't know any better about the corporate world. They will purposefully forget to tell people certain things because they don't want to spend the money on you.

example: When I worked at a Mcdonald's in New Jersey. They were required by law of the state of New Jersey to wash that uniform for me. They purposefully left that little detail out and I had to wash all of my uniforms myself. I could've saved at least $200 from all the times I had to do my laundry if they had just washed it for me, and I was already struggling to pay rent.

tl;dr Corporations will hire young people simply because they don't know any better.

Wait a second...

When I walk into an EB or GameStop, a month or two before a new release comes out, they have displays of empty boxes with cover art that reads "Coming Soon--Preorder Today!" all over it. Where does this custom cover art come from, and why can't it be used for in-stock titles instead of gutting?

I'm personally opposed to shrink-wrap because it's wasteful. I'm not a crazy tree-hugger, but neither am I a fan of all the excess packaging made of non-recyclable and non-biodegradable materials that's just going to straight to landfill. On the other, neither am I a fan of a brand-new "gutted" copy not being returnable because it's an opened copy.

mjc0961:
Wow. I knew that people in general were stupid, but I never knew that so many were dumb enough to just happily pay full price for a used, gutted game which is clearly not new once you remove the shrink wrap. Why the hell anyone would accept that when you can go to any of the other stores that carry games and are franchised like GameStop (Walmart, Target, Best Buy, etc) is beyond me... Man people are dumb.

Infernoshadow211:
I understand the gutting thing. It makes sense to me. What I don't understand is why people complain that a game isn't new when only the shrink wrap is off. To me as, long as the disc is pristine, I get an instruction manual, and the box isn't dented, it's new.

Okay, go buy any new game from any other store, take off the shrink wrap, and try to return it and see if they think it's still new. HINT: They don't, because it's not. Even if you get a shrink wrapped copy at GameStop, they won't take it back under a return policy if you remove said shrink wrap. Hypocrisy much? You'd sell an opened game as new, you should return an opened game as well. Hell, unless they do something special to say you bought the gutted copy, you might not even be able to return that because it's got no shrink wrap.

And if you actually get a clean disc with no damage to the box or manual AND all of the DLC codes in the box and haven't been used yet, congratulations, you seem to have found the one GameStop on the planet that doesn't suck as much as the others.

Its not hypocracy, its business.

Nothing is stopping me from buying a game, burning it, and then returning it back to GameStop for full price. Lets remember they are a BUSINESS, and if people did that, they would lose MONEY. Once that plastic is gone, they dont know or care what you did to the disk, just know your not getting full price for it. You could have burned it, you could have played and beaten it, you could have just taken the wrap off. Either way, its considered used.

As for a gutted game, those games were handeled by an employee. Meaning if I take it back because of a problem, they replace it. Period.

As for the DLC codes being missing, that depends on the integrity of the employees, not the company as a whole. You can USUALLY get the person fired/the DLC if you complain about it. Seems like you have a bad experience with GameStop? Its a store, just like every other retail outlet. Not every Walmart has great service, doesnt mean there arent any good ones out there. Judging a company because they can turn profits is pretty bold.

You're going to make us wait a whole week for part 2? I wish it was only a 2 part series, this was a very short and barely informative read (but I can tell it's getting good).

Based on my experiences with Gamestop, I tend to favor as harsh a stance on them as possible, especially considering how they basically drove Gamecrazy out of business. Well, that and the fact that nobody rents movies from a store anymore, which probably hurt Gamecrazy's partner company, which I believe was Hollywood Video.

Still, I would like to say that employees are usually part of the problem rather than "on my side." GS doesn't pay them enough to care, and many times I've had an employee forget to actually put my freaking disc in the case so I can own the product I laid down cash for. I try to double-check their work, but I shouldn't have to considering the whole reason they are there is to serve the customer (and by that I mean make sure I buy something, which tends to imply I receive what I pay for). I've also had employees treat me like dirt for not spending a bunch/preordering, etc, and just be generally lame.

Not to say Gamestop isn't terrible, 'cause it is. It's just... They hire from the bottom of the barrel and treat their employees like crap, which I think negatively affects the behavior of their employees.

Another thing that bothers me about GS is that they do price jacking on old games. Sometimes it's because an old game gets rarer, other times I'm convinced they're trying to manufacture a fake shortage or demand where none exists. And since they are the only game store in town for many folks, they can get away with this provided people don't know how to use online websites to buy games.

I've gotten better deals for superior products at places like Fred Meyer. Just a day or two ago I saw Assassin's Creed for PC new at Freddy's for 10 bucks. Shortly after it came out KoF XI was $10 there, and I've seen copies of Super Gunstar Heroes (it was a while ago when the game was newer) for as little as $5 (this is all new prices).

Oh, and the flat pricing GS does is crap. I should save money if I buy a game in a crappy cheapo GS dvd case with no manual.

A very interesting article.

It's nice to see that there is another side of the argument. Good job.

cursedseishi:
-snip-

This makes no sense from a corporate level, let alone a store management level. For every gutted game sold, they have to gut another one (unless they have extra for some reason, but even that is wasteful) - less people are happy, it results in *more* work having to be done, and it's just plain bad customer service (it reeks of pure laziness to ask a customer to do one's work for them). You should really find someone over the head of this guy to complain to; hell, it's super sketchy that he actually had the balls to lie to you about it, which implies that more is going on than he wants to let on.

OT: Every GS store manager I've talked with are gamers, except possibly one. Most game less since they got a full-time job, but that's understandable.

Baby Tea:
I worked at a EB Games (Canadian Gamestop) for about 2 years, and the memories are flooding back. I actually enjoyed gutting, because it got away form the morons asking about games, or who think that I want to stand around and talk about their World of Warcraft characters.

Seriously: Guys would walk in, read your name-tag, and think you want to hear about their epic killstreak on Call of Duty last night, or every detail of your 4 hour raid. Guys, they just want to sell games. Get out of here.

I'm glad I'm done with it.

Oh I'll be asked by an employee if a game was good or bad, I'll summeriaze it quickly and be done, but I don't understasnd why people whould tell you that shit... Retarded...

OT: I don't mind gutting, I've simply never thought of it. I mean... You're getting the game right?

It doesn't surprise me one bit that a national retail chain staffs its stores with people who aren't particularly, deeply passionate about games. Why? Because that's not their job. Their job is to sell product and mind the store, and they don't need to have a life-long love affair with games anymore than a guy who sells cars needs to be some sort of huge car nut, or a waiter (or even the cook for that matter) serving and making your food needs to have been, from birth, wanting to serve or cook food. Certainly there's a minimum level of competency and service required, but that's really a different set of criteria.

For what retail chains pay people, how can you expect there to be some stringent bar to qualification? I absolutely love games of all sorts, but the last thing I ever wanted to do was to work retail, nor would I suggest it as a career path to anyone - they're jobs you take because you have to, in most cases. Or, in the author's case, for spending money I guess, though I'd think anyone headed to graduate school might find a better way to fill those months before he starts classes unless he really, really needed the money.

All that being said, I don't hold the same sort of contempt that a lot of gamers seem to have for retail game sales outlets or their employees. I don't excuse poor customer service or shoddy merchandise, as some of the previous examples state, but I don't go there with the expectation that I'm going to be dazzled by the passion and interest of a game store clerk. I go there to buy things, and as long as I'm getting what I paid for, I'm happy.

RvLeshrac:
The problem with TFA is that, contrary to "Ben's" opinion, Gamestop doesn't need to open games. They only need to have enough empty cases to cover the shelves, and can then swap out box art as is necessary. Imagine that, a way to have only a tiny number of "spare" game cases in the back of the store (5-10, to replace damaged display cases), and never open a new game.

I don't know what kind of thinking leads to "They'd need to keep one display box for every single game ever produced," but that's just idiotic.

Gutting USED games is fine, gutting NEW games is not.

And who produces said box art? It's not a small cost, especially when you factor in all games across all stores (the DS in particular has a large number of small releases); merely replacing one section and shipping it across the country is going to cost.

Publishers don't want to do it because they have bigger fish to fry (namely, the game itself), and it favors the bigger ones that are already cranking out the things for marketing to the smaller publishers (who need a higher bottom line like I need flooding in my basement). Gamestop can't or won't do it because they need to have the art given to them before the game ships, and assuming that's possible then they need to foot the bill to print it, and all of the above might not even be viable to them given the margins of new games, again especially for the smaller releases (who perhaps ironically stand the most to gain from said system). Such a system also favors fewer, larger stores as opposed to many, smaller stores (of which Gamestop is the latter).

A lot of this cost is maintaining such a system, as well - the cost of implementing a system is much higher (in both dollars and manpower).

Moreover, the fact remains that the current system works, and not enough people care for the companies to initiate sweeping changes. Plus, as someone mentioned earlier, Toys R Us had such a system in place and they *still* gutted games every now and again when it failed them.

Being as one who a) doesn't tend to buy games(*) anyway and b) lives in another country, but I'm wondering does the gutting process also happen to movie DVDs? And yes, I mean when you go into an actual store and buy one, not get it via Amazon or Netflix. Over here they gut the movies, because of the theft issue (and may be others, but I'm going with theft as it's an obvious issue), so we get non-shrink wrapped versions (they have some behind the counter) and they usually carefully handle the disc. But, and this might be an important but, as long as we have the receipt, they will exchange a problem disc with a new one.

(In one case, I had a DVD it took me about 6 months to get around to... I have a lot of DVDs, still haven't watched it in fact, got distracted by other ones... and found that there were no DVDs inside! I went back, showed the lack of DVDs plus receipt, and they put DVDs in (from sleeved discs).)

I accept the gutting issue as to me it has a sense to it. But is this just a Gamestop phenomena or common retail practice?

(*) And when I do, I get huge box with one solitary disc rattling around inside... what's up with that?

I'm glad I'm not the only one pissed off by the whole "gutting" trend.

I understand that the box contents are probably still "new" even if it's not wrapped. But what bugs me the most is that unwrapped games contribute to that nagging feeling that, when it comes to game packaging, nobody gives a shit anymore.

Forgive me if I'm being a sentimental old geezer here, but I remember when buying a game was a whole experience, and an integral part of that experience was when you walked out of the store with the shiny new box, took it home and then anxiously wrestled the shrink wrap off it so you could gaze in admiration at the care and attention to detail that went into the whole process. The game discs, the game manual(s), the catalogs from the publisher and probably at least one or two other goodies besides. I don't want to think about how much of that stuff would be missing if I bought the game in this modern "gutted" age.

I know that console gamers probably did not experience this particular golden age I'm referring to, but I've almost always been a PC gamer.

This whole argument is moot.

If you are concerned about getting a factory sealed copy of a game, politely ask the sales associate if they have a sealed copy they could sellyou instead.

If they do not, buy it somewhere else.

The author of this article is right. 95% of people buying at GS just don't care and so the guttting process is a suitable solution to serve the overwhelming majority of customers.

If you happen to fall into the minority that doesn't want your game opened, then pre-order (they don't gut pre order copies), ask for a sealed one, or go somewhere else.

Don't hang GS out to dry over it. They aren't doing it as a personal insult to you. Take some responsibility for your own shopping habits. They aren't holding a gun to your head forcing you to buy an opened game, you have the ability to refuse the sale.

-m

ritchards:

I accept the gutting issue as to me it has a sense to it. But is this just a Gamestop phenomena or common retail practice?

Gamestop's the only store I've ever seen do this, which is why it's so unacceptable to me.

Sorry but this series better turn up the interesting pretty quick.

Because finding out that a crappy retail job is staffed by people who have to do work that suck and explain policies they have no control over to customers who insist that you bend over and do it there way and that almost everyone in a position of power doesn't give a fuck about the hobby we care about is...you know, every fucking job.

Never really objected to gutting to be honest, if you're the last person to pick up the copy of the game, you're either A: some unlucky shmuck who was late to the punch finding out about the game or B: some douchebag who forgot to pre-order a game you wanted,

And that whole 'low gaming experience' thing is relative from gamestop to gamestop, sometimes you get a manager that's clueless about video games, other times you get one who's quite up to date and is capable of carrying a conversation, it's really (again) a matter of luck. =/

Still, very good read, I'm looking forward to the remaining parts.

It's pretty common knowledge that the 'gamestop dream job' isn't such a trip, that the corporate overlords are very demanding. It just gets lots of press because as they said, people are signing up for a low-stress job in the games industry when they're still in high school. Ha. Ha. No really. Heh.

No one ever interviewed me when it turned out working for Home Depot sucked.

Kyogissun:
you're either A: some unlucky shmuck who was late to the punch finding out about the game or B: some douchebag who forgot to pre-order a game you wanted,

Translation: Everyone who doesn't buy games on release day is either a schmuck or a douchebag.

That pretty much wins this topic, yes?

Does anyone else feel apathetic to this plight? I embrace digital delivery. Movies, music, television, books and games. I use Amazon, Steam, Direct2Drive, Hulu, my Kindle, Netflix and iTunes extensively. The only time I buy the physical version of anything anymore is when I simply cannot find it available to purchase online, or if I want a full Blu-Ray of something. I actually get really irritated when I need the physical copy too. I don't want discs laying around, crumpled DVD sleeves, broken XBOX 360 cases, ads sheets, fliers, guest pass cards and old books lying around - or piled in neat stacks in shelves, boxes or bins.

I find the idea of having to go out to buy any kind of information-based media completely anachronistic and a waste of gasoline, plastic, paper, retail space and time.

pneuma08:

RvLeshrac:
The problem with TFA is that, contrary to "Ben's" opinion, Gamestop doesn't need to open games. They only need to have enough empty cases to cover the shelves, and can then swap out box art as is necessary. Imagine that, a way to have only a tiny number of "spare" game cases in the back of the store (5-10, to replace damaged display cases), and never open a new game.

I don't know what kind of thinking leads to "They'd need to keep one display box for every single game ever produced," but that's just idiotic.

Gutting USED games is fine, gutting NEW games is not.

And who produces said box art? It's not a small cost, especially when you factor in all games across all stores (the DS in particular has a large number of small releases); merely replacing one section and shipping it across the country is going to cost.

Publishers don't want to do it because they have bigger fish to fry (namely, the game itself), and it favors the bigger ones that are already cranking out the things for marketing to the smaller publishers (who need a higher bottom line like I need flooding in my basement). Gamestop can't or won't do it because they need to have the art given to them before the game ships, and assuming that's possible then they need to foot the bill to print it, and all of the above might not even be viable to them given the margins of new games, again especially for the smaller releases (who perhaps ironically stand the most to gain from said system). Such a system also favors fewer, larger stores as opposed to many, smaller stores (of which Gamestop is the latter).

A lot of this cost is maintaining such a system, as well - the cost of implementing a system is much higher (in both dollars and manpower).

Moreover, the fact remains that the current system works, and not enough people care for the companies to initiate sweeping changes. Plus, as someone mentioned earlier, Toys R Us had such a system in place and they *still* gutted games every now and again when it failed them.

A 1c photocopy for each new release is hardly going to break the bank.

rockyoumonkeys:

Kyogissun:
you're either A: some unlucky shmuck who was late to the punch finding out about the game or B: some douchebag who forgot to pre-order a game you wanted,

Translation: Everyone who doesn't buy games on release day is either a schmuck or a douchebag.

That pretty much wins this topic, yes?

Um, no? Plenty of games have copies available after day one. I mean, I'm guilty of having such a thing befall me. It happened when I picked up a copy of Okami way back in like... 2006 IIRC. I got the last copy a local gamestop had and again, since I was late to the punch, I got a gutted copy.

I mean come on, as long as the disc isn't scratched, the booklet isn't missing or the game case isn't damage, I don't see anything problem with getting a gutted game. And since my gutted copy was in tact completely, I didn't feel cheated.

Sounds like you're just trying to make me seem like an asshole. And since when did shmuck become an insulting word? I was always kinda under the impression it wasn't that offensive of a word, like idiot or dork or whatever...

I add the word douchebag because I'm thinking of people who again, are like me and went 'hurr durr, I'm betting they'll still have a copy of this sleeper hit of a game that had a limited first printing!' like again, with Okami. And I also add it because if you forgot about pre-ordering a game you really wanted to play and get mad at the store for giving you the gutted copy well... Yeah, you're kind of a douchebag.

You/I/We only have yourself/myself/ourselves to blame, you/I/we had your/my/our opportunities to make a pre-order but you/I/we didn't. Unless you're/I'm/we're COMPLETELY BROKE and couldn't drop 5 bucks down on it (which usually isn't THAT difficult to come upon) then you/I/we didn't want it that badly and risk getting a gutted copy.

So it's more like... Anyone who forget about a game they really wanted to the point of not pre-ordering or picking up within the first 3-4 days of its releases (5-7 if it came out prior to/right after say, pay day) then yes, you kind of a douchebag if you complain about getting a gutted copy.

Again, unless the case/booklet are terribly damaged, the disc is scratched and unplayable or you got the wrong game, people's complaints are idiotic... And the cases in which you hear about people receiving games that are in this state are usually victims of either douchebag gamestop employees or a horrible accident wherein the game itself was already poorly packaged.

Also, I'd like to point out there have been situations in the past where this didn't happen to 'just' gamestop (I.E. receiving horribly gutted copies), IIRC there was a case where some kid picked up a copy of madden from walmart and got a case with a disc full of porn on it...

http://www.escapistmagazine.com/forums/read/7.85447-Walmart-Sells-Boy-Madden-09-With-Disc-Labeled-Redneck-S-t

See? Even Escapist reported it. :P

tl;dr if you pick up a game wayyyyyy too late (talking like, 2-3 weeks), you shouldn't get mad if you get a near mint condition 'gutted' copy, you should just accept it and move on and if you complain, then you should have bought it elsewhere. Otherwise, you're just complaining for the sake of complaining, I.E. you're kind of a douchebag.

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