Film This Chick Stuff! Part One: A Call for Aid

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Usagi Vindaloo:
- Lady Lovely Locks (does anyone else remember this show? For some reason I loved it as a kid. It had a few interesting plot threads, weird magic system, and a kind of cool villainess)

ROFL! I stumbled on this at 6am, one forgotten Saturday. It involved a bunch of noble blondes being assaulted by a bitchy brunette trying to steal their hair. Wow, that's a great message to be sending to girls, n'cest pas? If you thought the villainess was cool(I know I did) it's because she was trying to put a bunch of snobby princesses/cheerleaders in their place.

Frankly though, I think Raven Waves could have better spent her time and magic on pillaging hamlets and blowing up castles than stealing hair. Raising undead warriors, charming armies of orcs to overrun the country side. Maybe get a dragon or two.

Hang on, I'm gonna write this down.

DAMN MY PENIS!!!

I cant really think of much as my sister was abit of a Tom Boy so we just watched anime together which as you said is fairly open for all.

My cousin (ironically a guy) used to watch Xena but im sure I dont have to go into what that is, I mean come on, ITS XENA!!! Funny enough now I think about it Xena was just one of those male counterparts, you mentioned, of Hercules, which ironically ended up more popular.

Off the top of my head, Sailor Moon (again you guys already know this) and possibly Escaflowne which was basically Gundam Wing but girlier if thats possible concerning Gundams later character design.

http://www.google.co.uk/images?hl=en&source=imghp&biw=1366&bih=576&q=escaflowne&gbv=2&aq=0&aqi=g10&aql=&oq=escafl&gs_rfai=

http://www.animenewsnetwork.com/encyclopedia/anime.php?id=240

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Vision_of_Escaflowne

Sorry I cant find better sources and it already seems it has a movie, although this was also an anime so was proberly by the same company and ANIMATED BY BONES!!! WOW!!!

HOLY CRAP, I FORGOT ABOUT POWERPUFF GIRLS!!! I watched and loved that show.

Grievous222:
Honestly, I can't believe that no one has ever done a big budget Powerpuff Girls movie. I honestly don't know if that counts as a "girl show" but as a boy, I loved it, and always wanted a good movie. Of course Hollywood would probably turn it into a teen romance story, but still, it feels like an untapped well.

I loved that show too! I feel that because toys marketed at girls are attempting to be in the "now," they are dated very quickly. Whereas, GI Joe, when are specialized soldiers ever out of fasion? Or Legos, who doesn't like legos? I also feel that as women grow up, they want to hide away their childish toys and act mature as they see their "idols" on MTV and the like being older than their ages suggest.

And yes, I sometimes still play with my Legos when i visit my parents while hiding from my wife.

I think people are forgetting MovieBob's rule, that you can make a good movie out of anything.

Yes a lot of the franchises of the 80s that were aimed towards girls sucked. I tended to like Transformers and ThunderCats more than My Little Pony and Jem. But that's mainly because those shows were just so poorly made.

I'm sure a feature length movie made based on She-Ra and Jem, if done right, would actually turn out better than most people think. All it would take is a very talented director and screenwriter.

And yes I know She-Ra was a spin off but I for one would still like to see it because I was a big She-Ra fan as a child. It was the one "girly" thing of the 80s I did like.

Jem is perhaps the best bet. Its one of the shows looked on the most fondly of the girl franchises for the grown woman geek. Jerrica is a girl with some musical talent who manages her own company, takes care of the needy, and is an international world travelling rockstar who raises awareness to issues. Sound like anyone we know? Sure the whole wonder woman vibe may be much but it says alot that not only was there some substance behind things but there was a good deal of accomplishable goals and ideas.
The big thing about girl franchises often is how constraining they were. NO girl franchise I hear about in geek circles, admittedly not much for the girl geeks, is enjoyed straight in every interpretation of the word. The Misfits are thought of as cooler. Every female fan hates Rio and even likes making the girls gay for each other to a degree.

This is mainly because all girl franchises often were about forcing you to play house only ya know with this specific toy.

Now as to My Little Pony, might I just suggest a [URL="http://forum.rpg.net/showthread.php?t=489807"]second look[/url] its got some exploitable fun there. but also, the main thing is yes, they are tools for imagination which trend to social networks not icons into narratives you can follow to achieve a destiny of greatness.

Sailor Moon is pretty good, but also didn't really hit the cultural radar until the 90s. It would make a neat movie...I still want to a see a live action Full Metal Alchemist first though.

Azumanga Daioh.

I know it is "technically" a shonen series (Shonen being a Japanese term that means directed at a male audience) but out of the entire cast, there are only 3 named male characters, and only one of them is a human*. The entire rest of the series is focused on girls, in a way that is accessible to all audiences. The only real problem is that it wasn't a very long manga and even the anime only had enough material to fill a single season, so adapting it further might be difficult. (although, *hint hint*, there are 3 chapters of the manga released about a year ago that weren't adapted into the anime. Just saying.)

*EDIT: For clarification, of the other 2, one is a dog, and the other is a cat.

**EDIT^2: There's also a (presumably) male cat (thing) that shows up from time to time, that may or may not be the father of one of the characters.

I don't know how much I can say, I was also one of the girls who always did the boys stuff, I always ditched barbie dolls for videogames and always insisted on having the boys Happy Meals at McDonalds. But when I was growing up the girl things were Powerpuff Girls, Sailor Moon, Barbie, My Little Pony, Polly Pocket and Beanie Babies. Polly Pocket was quite popular back then, it was a lot different to the new Polly Pocket.

I'll deffinately be interested in what come up next week in your article. But I don't think there'll be much to be honest, girls toys of that age range and era seem to be mostly just negative female gender stereotypes. For instance a Barbie movie wouldn't work at all, it would probably fall under so much criticism for giving out an outdated and sexist message to you girls. Of course its the same message already given out by the toys but you bet more people would be angry about it on screen, or at least they should be... maybe it would sell but that would be depressing.

Darmani:
Jem is perhaps the best bet. Its one of the shows looked on the most fondly of the girl franchises for the grown woman geek. Jerrica is a girl with some musical talent who manages her own company, takes care of the needy, and is an international world travelling rockstar who raises awareness to issues. Sound like anyone we know? Sure the whole wonder woman vibe may be much but it says alot that not only was there some substance behind things but there was a good deal of accomplishable goals and ideas.
The big thing about girl franchises often is how constraining they were. NO girl franchise I hear about in geek circles, admittedly not much for the girl geeks, is enjoyed straight in every interpretation of the word. The Misfits are thought of as cooler. Every female fan hates Rio and even likes making the girls gay for each other to a degree.

This is mainly because all girl franchises often were about forcing you to play house only ya know with this specific toy.

Now as to My Little Pony, might I just suggest a [URL="http://forum.rpg.net/showthread.php?t=489807"]second look[/url] its got some exploitable fun there. but also, the main thing is yes, they are tools for imagination which trend to social networks not icons into narratives you can follow to achieve a destiny of greatness.

Peh, I'm sticking to my assessment that Jem should have been a holographic cyber-ninja and maybe did the rockstar crap on the side. You know why playing house is boring? You're emulating your parents, why the hell would any kid wanna do that?

Okay She-Ra is smuggling rainbow dust into New York and getting Barbie and the Rockers high and making their music suck, in fact it's a rainbow dust epidemic and all the toys are getting shit faced and dying in the street. Han Solo and Spider-Man are the detectives trying to break open the case, but they're carting Sailor Moon along as a klutsy rookie who screws up the operation. April O' Neal is the bitchy mechanic/tech girl who is violently hot for Han Solo. Shredder is the captain who is gonna have Han and Spidey's asses nailed to his office door if they don't knock off the loose cannon shit. Mean while Rainbow Brite is the rainbow dust ki-er queenpin? Anyway, she's using Ninja Turtles as slave labor and running guns from Cobra Commander and Destro who have eyes on taking the business for themselves, with a secret imported weapon, codename: VOLTRON! And yet one cannot over look pleasant baker Strawberry Shortcake, whose name keeps coming up in the confiscated files. Could something more sinister be on the horizon? And how does a ninja vigilante called Jem figure into all this?

It's a story so fucked up, the bat computer exploded trying to predict the outcome, can you?

Sir John the Net Knight:
And was there really lesbian stuff between Xena and Gabrielle? I mean, in the actual show not in the endless halls of bad fan fiction?

Xena is actually a pretty interesting case of an "unexpected-audience" occurance.

So goes the story, when they (the producers, Sam Raimi, Rob Tapert, etc.) created the show they figured the main appeal would be to horny teenaged boys, so they made it a hard-action show (actually much darker/meaner than Hercules) with almost no overt "femininity" but LOTS of sexuality and kept Xena herself casually-dismissive of men.

After about a season (this was pre-"everyone is online," so fan reaction was slower then) they were supposedly REALLY surprised to find out that the series had developed a HUGE lesbian following, so they "retooled" the central relationships accordingly. They never really "went for it" until the very last shows (though they had plenty of overtly lesbian supporting characters), and then only-subtley, but it was widely hinted and wink-wink'd for pretty much the whole rest of the run.

Anacortian:

This brings us to our current situation. As a guy, I can say proudly the the Ghostbusters and TMNTs were staples of my childhood fiction diet. I know of no adult girl who will so proudly laud Gem. My wife (an exception for never apologizing for the gender of her tastes) would joyfully see a Rainbow Bright remake, but she appears to stand alone at the grave of Miss Bright.

That's Jem hehe. I miss that show so much. It was my favorite growing up. I always made sure my grandmother recorded it for me so I could watch it after I school. To this day, someone can't mention synergy without me making a Jem reference. If a Jem movie, video game, or whatever came out I would be on it just on blind nostalgia. You probably couldn't even convince me that it sucked, even if it did.

I should also mention that it's rare that I go a week without someone mentioning Rainbow Brite or Strawberry Shortcake.

I and several of my friends would totally go see a Last Unicorn remake. I was strolling through Wal-Mart, saw that movie and just had to snatch it up.

Oh! And something that should totally get a second run are Popples. I love those little fuzzballs. http://moonprincess.com/popples/

For something a little more modern, I would dig a Totally Spies movie, but the way the show ended doesn't really leave any room for continuation, so I wonder how that could be approached.

Winx Club was cute, but I don't see any room to make that into anything more than a straight up kids movie.

Well, given that I'm the one who put She-Ra on the second page of your article, Bob, you can probably guess what I watched as a kid. As for toys, I had Weebles and Tree Tots and effing loved my Fisher Price castle, but nobody's going to make a movie out of any of those. The first movies I really embraced were Hangar 18, Raiders of the Lost Ark, and Star Wars, and the tv shows I watched were Dungeons & Dragons and The Smurfs.

There wasn't any good geek stuff for girls when I was young, because girls weren't allowed to be geeks. God help you if you liked "boy things" like slot cars and science. I did have a Barbie, and Fashion Plates, but I read a lot of Choose Your Own Adventure and Encyclopedia Brown. Nothing very movie-worthy there.

OK, I was a mid-80s boy who was into G.I. Joe, Transformers and He-Man hardcore, and transitioned into a fan of James Bond and the various 80s action stars (Der Governator, Stallone, Seagal, etc.). But along the way I became a fan of She-Ra and Jem.

The latter I found superior to its originating Spear Counterpart, for much the same reason I ended up liking Xena over Hercules. Both She-Ra and Xena were former villains who turned a new leaf, and spent the rest of their series redeeming themselves through heroics. In She-Ra's case, it was as the underdog. In He-Man's series, the good guys were clearly in charge of the place, and Skeletor and his goons were miscreants who occasionally showed up to try and overthrown the social order, but were always put down by He-Man & Co. While on She-Ra, the Horde ran Etheria as a police state, and she was an important part of the resistance. Maybe it was because Star Wars was still very fresh in everyone's mind, but I preferred the heroic rebels over the guys just maintaining the status quo.

(As an aside, has anyone ever noticed that being the heroic dissidents to an oppressive authority is one of the few times good, heroic and honourable characters are shown to be proactive? While in settings where society is portrayed as "good" and the villains as the occasional external threat, the heroes only ever react to the villains' plans? This might be one of the reasons I never really got into superhero comics.)

Jem was another property I'm surprised has never really been brought back (they bring back My Little Pony but not Jem?). Although much was made of the Clark Kent-style "love triangle" between Jem, Jerica and Rio, it was never an overwhelming part of any episode, and allowed to be a long-term plot complication (which was practically unheard of in 80s cartoons). And so much was going on in that series, from backroom corporate intrigue, to trampled egos, high fashion, vicious musical feuds that gave Tupac-Biggie a run for their money. The world of Jem is a place where women have a lot of power and personal agency while still thoroughly enmeshed in stereotypically feminine pursuits, e.g. pop music, high fashion, romance, traditional maternal roles. You'd think this would be a home run. Surely there's something here for the Hannah Montana crowd that's better than Hannah Montana?

I mostly had stuffed animals, Shiningtime Station and flight simulators when I was a kid. Explains why I like animals and trains and can recognize just about any warplane ever built.

Allison Chainz:
Oh! And something that should totally get a second run are Popples. I love those little fuzzballs. http://moonprincess.com/popples/

OH MY GOD, POPPLES!!

Sir John the Net Knight:
Peh, I'm sticking to my assessment that Jem should have been a holographic cyber-ninja and maybe did the rockstar crap on the side. You know why playing house is boring? You're emulating your parents, why the hell would any kid wanna do that?

Isn't that your premise right there? Rocker has special powers to manipulate light. Bad(tm) happens. Rocker realizes she can use her power to help, and plot goes from there.

As has already been said, I think the biggest problem is so many of the girls' toys tend to either lack any sort of conflict to be made into a mature premise, or simply are based on the childhood fantasies that don't age well.

Grievous222:
Honestly, I can't believe that no one has ever done a big budget Powerpuff Girls movie. I honestly don't know if that counts as a "girl show" but as a boy, I loved it, and always wanted a good movie. Of course Hollywood would probably turn it into a teen romance story, but still, it feels like an untapped well.

They did. The origin story was made into a movie and was even released in theaters (I think). Although you are certainly on to something there. Make a movie about what they're doing now. Hm...

My suggestion: SAILOR MOON! That was geared toward girls, right? I know I got picked on for watching it. But they did Dragon Ball Z, and that was a disaster, so maybe this isn't such a good idea. Still, I stand by it.

Two "girl-shows" that I tended to watch as a kid were She-Ra and Jem.

Not sure how these movies would turn out (probably pretty crappy - although that's how most of these nostalgia-films turn out anyway).

Aqualung:

Wakefield:
I don't think I can really make a contribution to this. I grew up with Digimon, Power Rangers, Ninja Turtles. I was way more into the boy stuff. I hated barbies and dolls and anything remotely girly...

I was a strange little girl.

Likewise. I was that one girl who always went to the little ditch the guys dug and played Beyblades with them. :/

The problem with female toys, though, is that they're often filled with so much fluff that it's extremely difficult to get a conflict out of it to make a compelling movie.

Fuck yeah Beyblades were awesome.

That is the problem. Boys stuff centers entirely around conflict...girl things... not much.

I'm sorry, Bob, but I think you're out of luck. I'm not so sure the big screen is an apt place to embrace any sort of female-oriented nostalgic franchise. The problem definitely lies in the substance of "the chick stuff". Don't get me wrong, the substance in most boy stuff was nothing more than billowing candy floss, but at least Michael Bay had something to work with when he made Transformers. It wasn't good, but it should have been easily translatable.

Explosions in the cartoon? Check. Put 'em in the movie.
Giant fucking robots from space in the cartoon? Check. Put 'em in the movie.
Sweet vehicles in the cartoon? Check. Put 'em in the movie.
Stupid love story between high school kids? No, but we'll throw that in for good measure, JUST SO THE GIRLS HAVE SOMETHING TO CARE ABOUT.

There lies a different problem. They really do TRY to make girls care about nostalgic boy-franchise movie adaptations. They don't try hard, and they ultimately fail (seriously, how many females here gave a shit about anything that happened in G.I. Joe?), but there is some element of trying to fit in some "substance" for the ladies.

Is there anything you could possibly put in My Little Pony that I would care about? Or the Care Bears? Strawberry Shortcake? Cabbage Patch Kids? Jem? Doubtful. Why? There aren't any explosions, guns, or sword fights. I'm not saying that I need those things in all of my movies for the movies to be enjoyable, but that's all any 8-year-old boy cares about, it's all that the cartoons of my youth reflected, and it better damn well translate to the screen exactly so.

What someone needs to do is quit trying to draw the gender-line between the girl stuff and boy stuff and translating them exactly, and try to make them enjoyable for everyone. It's hard, I know, but it's totally possible...through COMEDY. Action and romance usually follow strict gender-lines, but comedy doesn't. Everybody likes to laugh, and both guys and girls with thick enough skin can laugh at the same jokes.

They did this with Josie and the Pussycats (female-oriented show of the bygone era) with some mixed success. I'm pretty sure the film was a flop, but I found it quite enjoyable. Because it was FUNNY. It had jokes that EVERYBODY could laugh at, and the romance was more of a subplot than anything else. The subject matter didn't follow gender lines (for the most part), and I thought they did a great job at making some jokes and throwing in lots of visual humor.

There lies your solution.
Quit making gender-films, and turn old shit into COMEDIES. Imagine how much larger an audience could be reached by making them all laugh...

I was and 80's child along with my twin sisters who are a little over a year older then me. At an early age, if I wanted to play with them, they would essentially make me use their toys. Based on their toys compared to mine, I feel the following toys are a good representation of what was marketed towards girls:

-My Little Pony
-Rainbow Bright
-Jem
-Pound Puppies
-Cabbage Patch dolls
-Popples
-Shera
-Strawberry Shortcake
-Berenstain Bears
-Barbies
-Glow Worms
-Care Bears
-Keypers
-Wuzzles
-Chubbles
-American Girl Dolls
-Kid Sister
-Hungry Hungry Hippos (What? There was a pink one..)

I was subjugated to playland torture when I was young. Although my payback came in the form of a G.I. Joe, Star Wars action figure, and Army men coalition that resulted in an epic scene depicting the decapitation of hundreds of Barbies. I laugh when I think of the screams heard when they entered their room on that particular afternoon.

Seems that most of the comments say the same thing: girl toys were not movie-worthy. I think the problem is that they simply pandered to the more girly desires, which didn't go much beyond making something cute and frilly. Naturally, they made money because those desires do exist, but it underestimated the market. With G.I. Joe, you can make a halfway entertaining action flick, same with Transformers. I mean, that's just soldiers and giant robots, which are blockbuster material even without the name.

But what is Strawberry Shortcake beyond her name and brand? Just some girl? She smells good? Same goes for Barbie, she's just some chick without the name. To make a good movie with those, you'd basically be coming up with an entirely new IP, in which case you might as well just drop the name. Isn't any movie about a fashion-obsessed girl already as far as a 'Barbie' movie could go?

movienut:
Those are all (with the exception of She-Ra) not just "girlie" but also toddlerish. The pink side of the aisle is not quite out of the forumla and diaper stage apparently. The is at the heart of the problem, girl stuff was (is?) boring and babyish. Nothing witty, deep or epic. Pablum mixed with pink frills and lace.

This, exactly. Nowhere for the properties to go, really.

Whargarble:
Hollywood knows that. They want to reach as much of an audience as they can. Seeing as how a "boy movie" would bring in both the male and female audience, rather than a "girl movie" bringing just the female, it's the safer (and more profitable) bet to just make the "boy movie" and not bother with anything else.

This too, definitely. From the outset we're looking at an imbalance in how the different types of films are perceived. Hollywood's best bet is to just incorporate feminine sensibilities into story and character development, while still providing the meaty action we love. A specifically feminine film is excluding a large potential audience.

Susan Arendt:

There wasn't any good geek stuff for girls when I was young, because girls weren't allowed to be geeks. God help you if you liked "boy things" like slot cars and science. I did have a Barbie, and Fashion Plates, but I read a lot of Choose Your Own Adventure and Encyclopedia Brown. Nothing very movie-worthy there.

If they did a Choose Your Own Adventure movie, some fat guy would be poisoning me in the basement about ten minutes into the movie. The End.

Um...Bob, lack of research isn't exactly something you should be proud of.

/pointless university student bitching (what, I like people to actually INFORM themselves before they start making claims)

As a man who used to watch Gilmore Girls and loved it, I hold no judgement against people embracing media directed at both genders.

Please, someone make a Baby Laughalot movie:

She's like a Great Old One, the sight of her drives people mad.

Thank you for remembering Mighty Max. Was nice to see someone besides me remembers them.

Now I think the main reason why there is more guy toys than girl toys being made into movies and such goes back to the Feminist movement. Of women wanting to be treated like a man, and men not wanting to be treated like a woman.(Yes I know this is a bit offensive but it is in the purpose of a point.) For guy toys all they had to do to include the female audience was to have a girl character. Didn't matter if the only difference was the Y and there was an inclusion of the female audience. My sister when younger had a Polly Pocket but would more often play with me and my Mighty Max toy because she could be Bee since the only difference was hat color.(Max being blue while Bee was pink)

There was times when I did play with her and her Barbie but I would have Picard or some other toy I own. This was because there is only Ken as the only male character(there may have been others I have no idea). There was the idolised version of a dream guy. Other than that the guys were boxed out of girls toys. Which a lot of things still towards the female persuasion without including the male audience. Now a lot of male target shows like SWAT Kats did included the female audience(or atleast tried) with adding female character Lieutenant Felina Feral.

Now it is not to say all female targeted shows fall this way since Pepper Ann(the female equalivant to Doug I believe) a great female focused show worked outside the box of what a girl should be much like Barbie. It wasn't till going outside of the same old same that you get with Carrius Explains it All of the same old same old of a underclass (see loser, unpopular, not with the cool kids, ect) girl that wants to be the upperclass (see popular, cool, ect) girl.

A lot of times even if it isn't a lot of exectives of the show wants to make it. Secret World of Alex Mac for example. Which is done to get it appeal to more girls they will gut out what makes it good. Turing the main character into the Barbie girl which will often alienate any of the male crowd or the female crowd that were there be cause the character was intresting.

Where the best shows that do have females in it aren't female central shows, but gender nuteral shows. Tiny Toon Adventures, Animaniacs, Beetlejuice, Recess, Where on Earth Is Carmen Sandiego?, and Big Wolf on Campus(and ect but stopped before becoming a list of shows I like). Where it doesn't matter if the character was male or female they were both just characters would you find the best male as well as female characters.

Any show that is away from the idea of making a boys show or a girl show ends up being just a show where characters are able to exsit.

I thought some more about what in general I am nostalgic about from my childhood, and, being the bookworm that I am, a book series stood out (aside from the one that got me into reading, Harry Potter).

The protagonist's three main qualities were as follows:
Stoicism
Perseverance
Strong Work Ethic

Now, take into consideration, the protagonist is training to become a knight, what gender is this mystery protagonist?

She's a girl, and she is, bar none, my favorite protagonist geared towards my gender. One of the main messages you get from this book is hard work and determination beat prejudice any day of the week, and that's a lesson that's pretty universal for us, I think.

The part that's geared towards girls specifically, is the fact that she's a pseudo-veterinarian. She takes care of animals, and in return, when she looks like she got in over her head, they end up lending some small hand that turns the tide of battle. This translates as "tending relationships makes you a stronger person."

Yeah macho men don't want to hear that and will probably demean people for watching a movie with that message in it, but macho men aren't the target audience. Girls are. And if you haven't noticed, that is pretty much the ONE message media geared towards girls ever has, if it has a message at all.

Also, the series is called Protector of the Small, by Tamora Pierce, if anyone cares.

No mention of Herself the Elf? That was an awesome 80's cartoon! And David the Gnome, but that was more all encompassing as opposed to just female.

I remember growing up on Sailor Moon, My Little Pony, Barbie, Animaniacs, Mighty Max and the entire Nicktoon lineup. I'm sure there's more but my brain's a little fuzzy today.

As far as toys go, I remember having Popples, Strawberry Shortcake, Pillow People, and again, probably more that escape me at the moment.

Also, girls aren't so different from boys that boys can't hazard a guess as to why girls do and don't like things based on the merits and detriments they find in them.

I only read the first line. That's all I really wanted to read.

If you don't do research for your shows you're only going to piss more people off that way, and you'll end up losing respect in some areas. Not to mention, it makes me feel bad for believing you and supporting you.

MB202:
I only read the first line. That's all I really wanted to read.

If you dont' do research for your shows you're only going to piss more people off that way, and you'll end up losing respect in some areas. Not to mention, it makes me feel bad for believing you and supporting you.

Maybe you should at least read the second line. The whole point is when you work in a certain field long enough, you generally don't have to. I'm sure if an auto mechanic with years of experience started talking to you about cars, you wouldn't complain about him not having researched what he was saying. Bob's recognizing that he lacks knowledge in this area and is asking for others' experience and opinions.

Wait a moment, that is a form of research.

MB202:
I only read the first line. That's all I really wanted to read.

If you dont' do research for your shows you're only going to piss more people off that way, and you'll end up losing respect in some areas. Not to mention, it makes me feel bad for believing you and supporting you.

Maybe you should at least read the second line. The whole point is when you work in a certain field long enough, you generally don't have to. I'm sure if an auto mechanic with years of experience started talking to you about cars, you wouldn't complain about him not having researched what he was saying. Bob's recognizing that he lacks knowledge in this area and is asking for others' experience and opinions.

Wait a moment, that is a form of research.

Sir John the Net Knight:

You know why playing house is boring? You're emulating your parents, why the hell would any kid wanna do that?

From an anthropological point of view, why the hell WOULDN'T you want to do that? If the culture doesn't make you want to follow tradition, it's going about its own demise.

Now that I'm into that train of thought, that's an interesting way of looking at things. The institution of the "Working Man/Dad" is no longer being supported by the institution of "Media," and this change of reinforcement occurred significantly before the institution of "House Mom" stopped being supported by the institution of "Media." However the institution of "Higher Education" has stopped supporting the institution of "House Mom" in favor of the institution of "Working Woman/Mom," but continues to support the institution of "Working Man/Dad."

Times. They are a-changing.

I would think that Jem and She-ra would make good movies; heck, Jem was a superior "Hanna Montana" before Mylie Cyrus was born.

My Little Pony could make a decent kids' movie (80s version).

...yeah, the list is pretty short.

I would like a better Smurfs movie to come out than "Smurf'd". I could write a better Smurfs movie.

Ultimately: I'd make the Jem! movie and be done with it. It's the only "girls" property from the 80s that would translate well to 2010.

Eeeeeh...

Well, me being very specifically male, I have a very outsider looking in approach to this, but from my experience hanging around sisters, girlfirends and other assorted females, it seems to me that the chick nostalgia is going to happen in ten to fifteen years.

Because, yeah, we got the cool stuff in the 80s and 90s, but they totally own it now. In 2025, the big revival of heavily marketed, pre-cooked crap aimed at children will be those W.I.T.C.H. comics my little sis used to have littering her room or any of the various girl-firendly anime series we haven't really heard about. Powerpuff girls? It's coming. Both of my sisters and my mom religiously followed Charmed and Buffy and Angel and all those shows with ass-kicking girls in them. And you know what? So did I.

And, like others said, that's the key. They are regurgitating the boy stuff because with some tweaks the girls can get into Spider-man or Transformers just as well but, get this, a nice chunk of the pop culture we guys like? That's girly stuff. It's aimed at them. We just go with them to watch. Sure, Twilight missed the mark with men but, really, other than a few cosmetic elements (glitter et al), the formula for Harry Potter is exactly the same as the formula for Twilight, and nobody can seriously claim that anything about Supernatural is intended to engage a heterosexual male.

So yeah, girly pop culture? It's here. It's just not a nostalgic rehash of cheap 80s toy commercials, but new content, and the kind of new content that will be remade in a couple of decades to attract the current teen girls with their boyfriends in tow.

Snake Plissken:

What someone needs to do is quit trying to draw the gender-line between the girl stuff and boy stuff and translating them exactly, and try to make them enjoyable for everyone. It's hard, I know, but it's totally possible...through COMEDY. Action and romance usually follow strict gender-lines, but comedy doesn't. Everybody likes to laugh, and both guys and girls with thick enough skin can laugh at the same jokes.

They did this with Josie and the Pussycats (female-oriented show of the bygone era) with some mixed success. I'm pretty sure the film was a flop, but I found it quite enjoyable. Because it was FUNNY. It had jokes that EVERYBODY could laugh at, and the romance was more of a subplot than anything else. The subject matter didn't follow gender lines (for the most part), and I thought they did a great job at making some jokes and throwing in lots of visual humor.

There lies your solution.
Quit making gender-films, and turn old shit into COMEDIES. Imagine how much larger an audience could be reached by making them all laugh...

THIS PERSON HAS WON ONE INTERNETS.

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