Film This Chick Stuff! Part One: A Call for Aid

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Hmm, I don't really have any girlishness-oriented nostalgia, seeing as I'm a guy and all. The only thing I really know about to contribute are some girls anime I've seen. Escaflowne has already been mentioned, which did an excellent job of appealing across genders as it mixed a traditional boys plot of giant magical robots and reclaiming a lost kingdom with relationship building between characters and a female main character who women apparently found pretty relatable. Sailor Moon has also been mentioned, which might not be remembered fondly, but actually had some really good narrative and character arcs if you cut out the filler and ignore all of the times that characters renig on their growth. The only other one I have to add is Princess Tutu. Sounds extremely vapid when you hear the name, but the story is actually an extremely interesting meta-narrative in a sort of Brothers Grimm style fairy-tale where a dead author trys to torment all of the characters in a story he wrote because he thinks tragedy makes for better drama. Things start to get interesting when the characters decide that their traditional fairy tale archetypes are stupid and rebel against the plot.

I don't have a point, just thought this was interesting. A prof once told me a story how toy companys noticed little girls played with toys marketed towards boys much more then boys would play with toys marketed towards girls (I know, this statement is obvious). So what did they do? They made toys marketed for girls that were the pink counterparts to so called boys toys. I mean that literaly, they made pink fire engines and such. Guess what? They didn't sell. Girls hated them. She-Ra also came around when an executive notived his daughter playing with her Barbie like she was a superhero. Also, a feminist/psychologist once took away her daughters dolls, and replaced them with toy trucks and other so called boy toys. She walked in on her daughter playing only to see her daughter had swaddled up a truck, was rocking it in her arms telling it what a nice baby truck it was.

On a side note, I read a little while ago because of the high number of women who play video games (ages 18-30 make up 40% of video game consumers or something like that, beating out males 18 or less) they decided to make more game that appeal to women. Guess who there getting to come up witht he concepts, MARTHA STEWART. This seems like another example of the pink fire engine to me.

My sister used to love playing with the sylvanian families, which was basically a sort of dolls houses with friendly forest creature folks.

They'd proabably attempt something like this if they tried to bring most "girly" stuff into the movies these days:

I'm glad Escaflowne was mentioned! As omegawyrm said, " which did an excellent job of appealing across genders as it mixed a traditional boys plot of giant magical robots and reclaiming a lost kingdom with relationship building between characters and a female main character who women apparently found pretty relatable."

I'm surprised no one's mentioned Card Captor Sakura! (seeing as anime's could be mentioned...) It was such a good show; the main character grew up and changed through out the story, as did those around her. Her powers grew reasonably (she captures a more powerful card; she can use it, she's forced to transform cards that will use her energy; general power increase) and the increase in her power is mentioned and has an effect on the story!

Other than that, in Hayao Miyazaki's films, the main character is usually a strong female who grows through the movie. There is romance too, but it's usually secondary to the main plot/vital in a not annoying way. For example, Castle in the Sky. Sure, Pazu cared for Sheeta, but he also didn't assume she was helpless.

And I also never really played with boys toy's or a lot of girls toys, for that matter. I was reading all the time.

Nerf Ninja:
My sister used to love playing with the sylvanian families, which was basically a sort of dolls houses with friendly forest creature folks.

They'd proabably attempt something like this if they tried to bring most "girly" stuff into the movies these days:

This person also wins one internets.

Just for the 6 year old at the end. Priceless.

OceanSapphire:
I'm glad Escaflowne was mentioned! As omegawyrm said, " which did an excellent job of appealing across genders as it mixed a traditional boys plot of giant magical robots and reclaiming a lost kingdom with relationship building between characters and a female main character who women apparently found pretty relatable."

I'm surprised no one's mentioned Card Captor Sakura! (seeing as anime's could be mentioned...) It was such a good show; the main character grew up and changed through out the story, as did those around her. Her powers grew reasonably (she captures a more powerful card; she can use it, she's forced to transform cards that will use her energy; general power increase) and the increase in her power is mentioned and has an effect on the story!

Other than that, in Hayao Miyazaki's films, the main character is usually a strong female who grows through the movie. There is romance too, but it's usually secondary to the main plot/vital in a not annoying way. For example, Castle in the Sky. Sure, Pazu cared for Sheeta, but he also didn't assume she was helpless.

And I also never really played with boys toy's or a lot of girls toys, for that matter. I was reading all the time.

Miyazaki's films are great in their own right, no live-action necessary.

conflictofinterests:
Also, girls aren't so different from boys that boys can't hazard a guess as to why girls do and don't like things based on the merits and detriments they find in them.

That is why any show that doesn't just cator to boys or girls tends to be good. I understand there needs to be a certain basic demographic at first to aim at when starting off. Pepper Ann start out with female demographic fist and then blossomed out after having that clear focus.

OceanSapphire:
I'm glad Escaflowne was mentioned! As omegawyrm said, " which did an excellent job of appealing across genders as it mixed a traditional boys plot of giant magical robots and reclaiming a lost kingdom with relationship building between characters and a female main character who women apparently found pretty relatable."

I'm surprised no one's mentioned Card Captor Sakura! (seeing as anime's could be mentioned...) It was such a good show; the main character grew up and changed through out the story, as did those around her. Her powers grew reasonably (she captures a more powerful card; she can use it, she's forced to transform cards that will use her energy; general power increase) and the increase in her power is mentioned and has an effect on the story!

Other than that, in Hayao Miyazaki's films, the main character is usually a strong female who grows through the movie. There is romance too, but it's usually secondary to the main plot/vital in a not annoying way. For example, Castle in the Sky. Sure, Pazu cared for Sheeta, but he also didn't assume she was helpless.

And I also never really played with boys toy's or a lot of girls toys, for that matter. I was reading all the time.

Card Captor Sakuria I believe wasn't mention earilier is because the dub and the sub are two seperate shows. There is a whole story arch of Sakuria and Lee are after the same guy for awhile. Another aspect might be that is anime that came from Japan. Getting the rights for a property becomes that much harder then one here in America. Which is I believe most are going with American(or atleast was shown in America) for making a movie based on the property. Since it would be easier to get the rights to.

conflictofinterests:
I thought some more about what in general I am nostalgic about from my childhood, and, being the bookworm that I am, a book series stood out (aside from the one that got me into reading, Harry Potter).

The protagonist's three main qualities were as follows:
Stoicism
Perseverance
Strong Work Ethic

Now, take into consideration, the protagonist is training to become a knight, what gender is this mystery protagonist?

She's a girl, and she is, bar none, my favorite protagonist geared towards my gender. One of the main messages you get from this book is hard work and determination beat prejudice any day of the week, and that's a lesson that's pretty universal for us, I think.

The part that's geared towards girls specifically, is the fact that she's a pseudo-veterinarian. She takes care of animals, and in return, when she looks like she got in over her head, they end up lending some small hand that turns the tide of battle. This translates as "tending relationships makes you a stronger person."

Yeah macho men don't want to hear that and will probably demean people for watching a movie with that message in it, but macho men aren't the target audience. Girls are. And if you haven't noticed, that is pretty much the ONE message media geared towards girls ever has, if it has a message at all.

Also, the series is called Protector of the Small, by Tamora Pierce, if anyone cares.

First of all I LOVE Tamora Pierce, I think all girls going through their early teenage years should be required to read almost all of her books (minus the Circle ones - they weren't that great)! The series that I think is the best, and to me defined my childhood as a girl, is the Song of the Lioness quartet. Alanna, the heroine, actually paves the way for Kel in the Protector of The Small series, and she is the person I always told people I wanted to be when I grew up . . . Actually I still want to be her and I already am grown up!

The story is about Alanna, who grows up in a mideaval fantasy society, where she is supposed to go off and get married and instead she decides to become a knight! (link to more info: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Song_of_the_Lioness). This is one of thoes things that I would love to see made into a movie (or series of movies), but at the same time I cringe at the thought, because I'm sure they wouldn't be able to make it as good as it was in my head.

Other "girly" things from my childhood . . . hmm . . . mostly I liked shows where there was at least one girl who kicked some ass, usually she ended up being part of a group of all guys, but I was ok with that. Examples: Power Rangers, Voltron and others that I'm sure I'm forgetting, but thoes were definitely the main two. I really hope they make a Voltron movie, even if it is totally terrible I will go see it!

Allison Chainz:

Anacortian:

This brings us to our current situation. As a guy, I can say proudly the the Ghostbusters and TMNTs were staples of my childhood fiction diet. I know of no adult girl who will so proudly laud Gem. My wife (an exception for never apologizing for the gender of her tastes) would joyfully see a Rainbow Bright remake, but she appears to stand alone at the grave of Miss Bright.

That's Jem hehe. I miss that show so much. It was my favorite growing up. I always made sure my grandmother recorded it for me so I could watch it after I school. To this day, someone can't mention synergy without me making a Jem reference. If a Jem movie, video game, or whatever came out I would be on it just on blind nostalgia. You probably couldn't even convince me that it sucked, even if it did.

I should also mention that it's rare that I go a week without someone mentioning Rainbow Brite or Strawberry Shortcake.

I and several of my friends would totally go see a Last Unicorn remake. I was strolling through Wal-Mart, saw that movie and just had to snatch it up.

Oh! And something that should totally get a second run are Popples. I love those little fuzzballs. http://moonprincess.com/popples/

For something a little more modern, I would dig a Totally Spies movie, but the way the show ended doesn't really leave any room for continuation, so I wonder how that could be approached.

Winx Club was cute, but I don't see any room to make that into anything more than a straight up kids movie.

I think I'll be forwarding this to my wife. She would be glad to know that there are others like her out there.

My best recommendation: let it die out and stay there. I think the nostalgia for men actually allows for the old toys and series to make a new round while women are generally sick of the stuff they had as girls if not burned out and having developed an intense hatred of the color pink.

As for myself, I grew up with video games more than any other kind of toy. Largely, the toys my family had about were on the neutral side of things: Legos, board games, etc. Seeing the way my adult female friends and relatives feel about toys and games marketed at a female audience, I feel I was lucky not to be overexposed to the lacking content and single-colored insanity of it all. When it comes to the video games marketed towards girls... that's when I start to take offense to this stuff as it seems to be trying to force us backwards into abolished gender roles of yore (not to mention somehow trying to keep guys out of hobbies/talents that have nothing to do with genitilia either way).

On the topic of making movies from the girly stuff, it might be better to just make something of substance loosely inspired by it but with no real affiliation or attempts at nostalgia. Just taking the concepts and untapped potential, I'm sure that some appealing stories could be told. With as many careers as Barbie's had, she practically rivals Superman's powers in deus ex machina; imagine a story about a paragon of humanity with the capacity to do anything she puts her mind to without even needing super powers, it's practically a pulp hero drama already (though it might come off as a female recasting of The Pretender).

Probably the fatal weakness of trying to adapt girl's toys to a movie is, as many have stated, the lack of an underlying plot. Shoujo anime pretty well fills the niche that those toys played: relationships; but a feature-length film would probably be lost on an audience without a more encompassing conflict.

In the end, trying to make something that would have more than a single-gender appeal is a better bet than intentionally shunning half a potential audience. Good storytelling has, time and again, shown that the original expectation of an audience can be greatly mistaken (just look at Xena and Sailor Moon, which expanded dramatically beyond such, I'm certain there are others as well, but those two were most on my mind from reading the posts here).

P.S. If you managed to read all this, you deserve a cookie. ;)

I think one of the issues is that female centered toys and shows tended to be both anti conflict and more focused with real life. You could make a movie using creepy crawlers as a premis (a mad scientist invents an ooze that can he can use to create mutants) but what would and easy bake oven movie be about? What would a cabbage patch kids movie be about?

While not strictly "pink ale" You could argue that The Smurphs movie sort of counts as it had more crossover appeal than GIJoe or transformers (not that I am happy about it being maid).I could see Fragile Rock fitting in a similar gender "nutrual zone."

My staples were TMNT and Power Rangers, so I wasn't much for the chick stuff. I did watch Sailor Moon for a while when it was on Toonami, and I thought Power Puff Girls was fun (even though the first time I saw it I was honestly convinced it was some kind of joke instead of an actual show), but for the most part I never really knew that much about girl-centered shows until many years later. That said, here are my thought the possibilities:

-There IS a live-action Barbie movie in development, but not much is being said.
http://www.comingsoon.net/news/movienews.php?id=59406

....more later

I don't think you're going to get too many girls in here saying their favourite "girly" toys and so forth. Why? Because you're asking kinda the wrong demographic. This website is a home for geek and gamer culture. They aren't the sort of people who played with Barbies at a young age regardless of gender.

I used to buy toy soldiers and toy monsters, than I would clip them apart, and do transplants to make super mutants.

Today I'm studying biology...muhaHAHAHA!

They already turned one of my favourite childhood toys into a media franchise. Littlest Pet Shop Pets. In the mid-90s, they were cutesy-kinda-realistic animal toys, with the gimmick that each had a "trick" or special function of some sort. Like a puppy with a magnetised nose, so that it could "hold" its magnetic bone. Or a pony that pawed the ground when you stroked its neck. There was a TV show back then, too, and I think some books? but I was only interested in the toys. Anyway, the franchise was killed off at some point - late 90s, early 00s? - but a few years ago it was relaunched. Now the toys are funny-looking bobble-head creatures, and they have cutesy video games and board games and I don't know what and oops, I just vomited all over my keyboard. As far as I know, there's no Littlest Pet Shop movie, but if/when there is, I will have nothing to do with it.

Honestly, I don't think I'd have any interest in a movie based on any of the girly toys/books/TV shows I used to watch as a kid, because they were all pretty stup-- actually, a movie based on the Trixie Belden books might be okay. Horses, mysteries, good-looking young people, frequent holidays (it's so nice having a best friend whose parents are richer than Croesus and who is spoilt rotten). A bit of romance, but never getting in the way of having adventures. I don't expect a movie based on Trixie's exploits would be good, but it might be entertaining. I'd see it out of curiosity, anyway...

Holy crap, Small Wonder, I remember that.

Jem was also the first thing to pop into my mind. I never actually watched it, being a boy and all, but I always saw the end credits because it was on before something I did watch. It's an outstandingly 80's property, and it had a catchy as hell theme song. Plus, I really like movies about bands, and I might very well be willing to see it (without my girlfriend, even!) if someone did pick it up.

Bob:
(The big exception here is anime/manga fandom, which is quite frankly light-years ahead of any other fandom subculture in terms of its ability to both welcome and absorb fans both across racial/gender and sexual orientation lines.)

*Smiles beamingly, goes back to reading yaoi.*

Sorry I can't give any help for girls toys.

Gumby and Pokey hands down.
i work at a pet store and we sell more gumby and pokey dog toys than any other kinds of toys
No joke.
http://www.entirelypets.com/gumbypokey6.html

and everyone else who saw them nostalgia'd so hard.

I loved The little mermaid as a kid and Jem, the Last Unicorn, Rainbow Brite and Raggedy Ann and Andy. I guess I was pretty girly but also played video games and with my brothers X-men. Ultimately I can't help but push for a REAL Buffy the Vampire Slayer movie. One without the company influence. I know it was 90's but I started at the first episode in 5th grade and it totally changed my life (I even got a klagdah tattoo on my back to commemorate it) that or maybe a retool of Labrinth, good times.

Honestly? With the exception of She-ra, girl toys and shows were shit. My Little Pony could be okay and a kirby movie aimed at younger girls/children (with Miyazaki the helm and gibli doing animation shut up a girl can dream) is something I would push for as a hollywood exec. As far as girl geek stuff? Look no further than girl's books.

If they were to make anything for girls that would be viewed as empowering and could be turned into an all out nostalgia fueled franchise, hello American Girl. http://store.americangirl.com/agshop/static/home.jsp

This was huge when I was growing up. The premise: girls throughout history (Victorian era/prairie settler era/WW1 etc) going through problems and trials, using their wit and unique strengths to pull through. Each girl had multiple books and dolls, along with tons of clothes and accessories. There are even stores that let you customize your dolls to a finite degree. FYI, Kirsten was my favorite :)

The Eloise books have already been made into a movie so that's off. Hmm...

Actually, the more I think about it, the more I want to see a movie franchise made from these. There's a girl for every ethnicity and tons of culture and history to be gleaned and believe me, girls still geek out of these dolls.

If I come up with more I'll be sure to post it.

I've heard that Gail Simone's Birds of Prey comics are pretty popular among women. Not exactly nostalgic as it's a pretty recent comic, but they really are quite excellent. A few of the story arcs don't even have to be passed off as super-hero stories, though if you lose too many of the depth and fantastical elements of the characters backstories, the stories could lose some of their charm.

Same goes if they could just adapt one of her Wonder Woman stories, but fat chance of that.

Also, Ouran High School Host Club is an excellent comedy anime aimed at women and it probably wouldn't be hard at all to adapt into a movie or live action series. Though of course, when we're talking about these foreign properties, the licensing issues would probably be too ridiculous for anyone to even think about releasing an American adaptation.

JunebugJuJuBee:
Honestly? With the exception of She-ra, girl toys and shows were shit. My Little Pony could be okay and a kirby movie aimed at younger girls/children (with Miyazaki the helm and gibli doing animation shut up a girl can dream) is something I would push for as a hollywood exec. As far as girl geek stuff? Look no further than girl's books.

If they were to make anything for girls that would be viewed as empowering and could be turned into an all out nostalgia fueled franchise, hello American Girl. http://store.americangirl.com/agshop/static/home.jsp

This was huge when I was growing up. The premise: girls throughout history (Victorian era/prairie settler era/WW1 etc) going through problems and trials, using their wit and unique strengths to pull through. Each girl had multiple books and dolls, along with tons of clothes and accessories. There are even stores that let you customize your dolls to a finite degree. FYI, Kirsten was my favorite :)

The Eloise books have already been made into a movie so that's off. Hmm...

Actually, the more I think about it, the more I want to see a movie franchise made from these. There's a girl for every ethnicity and tons of culture and history to be gleaned and believe me, girls still geek out of these dolls.

If I come up with more I'll be sure to post it.

I think this might be the best idea yet.

Oh, and for the love of all that is good and holy please, please, please don't use Josie and the Pussycats as an example for anything that might be made in the future. That movie was so horrible and an example of how to trash an IP and waste your license. Besides, just because it's mainly a comedy won't make it necessarily any less gender aimed. I don't think anyone is going to accuse Sex and the City 2 of being gender neutral. Likewise, something like Due Date seems much more aimed at men.

As much as I agree with the principle it's going to be difficult since you're running up against a few really major stummbling blocks from the get go. First off Gril's toys rarely translate to narrative, and secondly there are few if any girl francises from the golden age of he-man and thunder cats that still enjoyed on a minor level.

First off the problem is that to do with a girl's show what was done recently with G.I.Joe and Transformers you're not so much looking for a t.v series as a francise. I suspect part of the reason thinking of subjects is so difficult is that it's rarer to find something for girls where they played with the toys, watched the T.V show and read the comic in the way you get with Transformers, G.I Joe, He-Man and numourious others. You get popular t.v shows and popular toys, but never both. I mean how many people remember the various efforts at a Barbie cartoon, and who's trying ever so hard to forget? If you want something with the same notelgia value you're going to be more lenient on how you define it. Popular books are probably a better start since they overcome the next major problem;

Girl's toy rarely have an obvious narrative. Children are effectivly playing roles with the toys they like. Boys are playing soldier and girls are play mother. O.K this is not universily true, boys sometimes play construction worker and girls play fashionable teenage girl, but during the period we're looking at it was still mostly true. The problem with this (well out of the many problems with) is that only boy's toys have an intrinsice narrative. To be a soldier you need a conflict, to have a conflict you need at least two sides and reason for them to fight, which is pretty much the basis of a story. To be fashion adept teen or a mother you need either clothing or a child, neither of which have stories intrinsically linked to them. This makes it harder to adapt girl's toys period, and will often make the adaptation more ham handed or at least foriegn to the initial toy line. Meaning that there's all the more reason why girls' don't get franchises.

The other problem is the demografic. While male nerds carry on the loves of their childhood into adult life, she geeks tend not to. She geeks tend to switch over to either traditionally male interests, or feminaised versions of them as they reach adolesance, meaning that you don't have the same nostelgia factor. Finding something that carries the same weight is going to be difficult. Geek culture is simply devided into things boys like, and things both genders can enjoy.

To my mind the best canidate is She Ra. Outside of being well within geek territory it's one of the few things that works as a full franchise that was aimed primarily at girls. I really wish that the early 2000's he man effort had lasted long enough to include She Ra (though it would have been odd since they were building up Hordak as this big powerful evil that He Man might not be able to defeat, if She Ra regually beat hm would that make her more powerful?). Also addapt the Tamora Pierce books, prefferably by peter Jackson. Seriously, nearly all female roleplayers and re-enactors (at least re-enactmors into the more geey activies such as combat) were all massive Tamora Pierce fans. An adaptation would be gold plated candy laced with crack for female geeks.

Honestly, there's no girl toy I'd want made into a movie. Guys had transformers and the ninja turtles, both of which made great shows or great movies.

I would NEVER want to see a live action Barbie movie or anything of the sort.

You know, the time to make a full length Wonder Woman movie is NOW! I know they plan on making a TV show out of it, but in my opinion, it's not the best move.
Women are forced to sit through movies with strong male characters constantly saving the weak female characters, so a movie with a strong woman would be a very nice change of pace for women.

And a Sailor Moon movie would be awesome, but if it ends up like the Dragon Ball Z movie, I may stab someone. I think it may not make a good live action movie since Hollywood can't seem to do justice to anime shows.

However, a think Totally Spies! could make a good movie. The show is pretty corny and silly, but it could translate into a goofy movie
image

You know what a really good idea would be? Make another Kill Bill-esque movie.
Kill Bill featured a strong, badass woman character and she kicked the living crap out of everyone that got in her way.
This was a movie that girls with strong stomachs (because of the gore) and guys could enjoy.

I remember getting the obligatory Barbie for Christmases and Birthdays when I was younger from people who assumed what I liked based on my gender. Eventually I had a large collection of them, and without exception they would all end up headless, naked and ignored a corner of the basement. Sure, they'd sometimes get SOME play time, but usually these sessions were short-lived, because in my opinion, you couldn't really do anything interesting with them. Barbies were static.

On the other hand, my brothers had these G.I.Joe knockoffs, and I would play with these all the time, climbing trees with them and making them survive the evils of the jungle in my backyard. These toys were implicitly dynamic, looking like they were able to solve problems, even ones that they started themselves. Compare this to Barbie, who looked like she could barely survive a clogged toilet. She's probably have to get Ken to fix it for her, and even then, he's such a wuss that he'd have to wash his hands for a good ten minutes afterwards.

This is the difference between boy's and girl's toys: are they static or dynamic? It's been said before, but I'll reiterate that girl's toys have a sense of blank-slatedness around them, and a lack of real conflict. Boy's toys don't have that problem.

Now, as far as cartoon and such, I was born in 1990, and can really only relate to 90's shows. Powerpuff girls were great, because they kicked butt. Sailor Moon kind of embarassed me, for unknown reasons. I secretly really liked watching Yu-Gi-Oh, Digimon and Pokemon with my brothers - though you'd never get me to admit it at the time. But most 'girly' shows would make me cringe and change the channel, because deep inside I felt that they were mocking me, telling me what I was supposed to feel and value.

-Wall of Text-

I always liked boys toys the best, but I wasn't really allowed to play with them. I went to a Catholic pre-school, and spent eight years in a Christian school after that. Anything I wanted to do, that wasn't something a little girl would do, I was 'corrected' by being lectured, and thought of as strange by faculty, and other little girls for having so many friends who were boys and wanting to play football. Rather then have snide, vicious, little girls for friends, who seemed to make fun of you more then they actually played with you. Of course, the term 'lesbian' was thrown around (when they always think they are out of ear-shot), but I wasn't attracted to girls and I didn't grow up attracted to them either, I just didn't want to be treated like all the rest of them, because I didn't have the same interests.

It was a constant conflict in the way I grew up. I'm my Father's only child, and he raised me with AC/DC, "girls don't cry, they wear combat boots", lets watch sports, shoot this gun, do you want a sip of my beer?, lets play video games, mentality. My Mother was always trying to beat that away with dresses, mary-janes, pop-music, 'plucking and waxing is fun' (shudder),Barbie, and shopping trips. And you know which one was/is way more fun? MY DAD'S! Derp.

Girls toys were forced on me, and I had them and I eventually played with them, because well, what else did I have? But mostly it was dumbed down mimicking of what I was told girls are supposed to do AND enjoy: Shopping, "Do you think that hot guy will ask me out?" stuff, it didn't really spark anything creative. I usually just hung out with imaginary friends I conjured instead. My Mother forced me to mature. When she thought I was too old for something, she'd simply swoop into my room when I was at school, put everything she thought I was too old for in a box, and give it away. I'd come home to a cleaned out room, where only a few stuffed animals survived. Then again, she was also the type of person to make me fold my pants over and over again until I got it right.

Personal opinion: The pink aisle is not imaginative. It's all about materialism, having and caring for babies,play kitchens, and shiny diamond-like baubles. Honestly (yeah, it's all coming to a close. Sigh with relief), girls toys don't make great movies, and they already make movies (animated and live-action) about all of the items intended for girls anyway. They may not be huge movies (or blockbuster), but they are there. There is nothing memorable, or worth a huge production where 'girls' toys are concerned.

Anacortian:
As a guy, I can say proudly the the Ghostbusters and TMNTs were staples of my childhood fiction diet. I know of no adult girl who will so proudly laud Gem. ..... In short, chicks (on the mass) either don't want the pink aisle revisited or are utterly apathetic towards it.

I don't think you have probably talked to a whole lot of girls about this subject. Plenty of us fondly (and proudly) remember our "pink aisle" cartoons (and it's Jem and the Holograms, by the way).

However (and I'll be discussing this in more detail in an email to you, MovieBob), this discussion is overlooking an uncomfortable fact that is no less true for being uncomfortable: "Pink aisle" shows in the 80s and 90s had less funding, lower attention to quality, and less interesting writing than their male-oriented counterparts.

I'm gonna blow your mind here. Are you ready?

The gender crossover we're all aware of - girls eagerly sitting down in front of Transformers or G.I. Joe - as well as the one we know didn't happen - little boys adoring My Little Pony (pre-FiM, hush) or Rainbow Brite - didn't occur because of cultural stereotypes telling girls it was okay to be boyish but not allowing boys to be girlish. It happened because the girls' shows were crappy, and discerning members of both genders realized it.

Do I go back and watch my copies of the 1985 run of My Little Pony? Sure, when I'm babysitting or in a nostalgic mood, yeah, I do. But would I ever, for even a minute, consider the show to be even remotely in the same ballpark as G.I. Joe? Sorry, no. And short of a complete visionary revamp (the likes of which none of the "boy aisle" movies have had to endure), I can't imagine a single one of those intellectual properties making a good movie.

kementari:

Anacortian:
As a guy, I can say proudly the the Ghostbusters and TMNTs were staples of my childhood fiction diet. I know of no adult girl who will so proudly laud Gem. ..... In short, chicks (on the mass) either don't want the pink aisle revisited or are utterly apathetic towards it.

I don't think you have probably talked to a whole lot of girls about this subject. Plenty of us fondly (and proudly) remember our "pink aisle" cartoons (and it's Jem and the Holograms, by the way).

However (and I'll be discussing this in more detail in an email to you, MovieBob), this discussion is overlooking an uncomfortable fact that is no less true for being uncomfortable: "Pink aisle" shows in the 80s and 90s had less funding, lower attention to quality, and less interesting writing than their male-oriented counterparts.

I'm gonna blow your mind here. Are you ready?

The gender crossover we're all aware of - girls eagerly sitting down in front of Transformers or G.I. Joe - as well as the one we know didn't happen - little boys adoring My Little Pony (pre-FiM, hush) or Rainbow Brite - didn't occur because of cultural stereotypes telling girls it was okay to be boyish but not allowing boys to be girlish. It happened because the girls' shows were crappy, and discerning members of both genders realized it.

Do I go back and watch my copies of the 1985 run of My Little Pony? Sure, when I'm babysitting or in a nostalgic mood, yeah, I do. But would I ever, for even a minute, consider the show to be even remotely in the same ballpark as G.I. Joe? Sorry, no. And short of a complete visionary revamp (the likes of which none of the "boy aisle" movies have had to endure), I can't imagine a single one of those intellectual properties making a good movie.

I understand that you were attempting to refute me, but I think you just supported my position.

...thanks.

Anacortian:

I understand that you were attempting to refute me, but I think you just supported my position.

...thanks.

Nope. The only thing I was refuting was the idea that girls are somehow embarrassed of what they watched as kids. The rest of the post was directed at MB.

ssManae:

MB202:
I only read the first line. That's all I really wanted to read.

If you dont' do research for your shows you're only going to piss more people off that way, and you'll end up losing respect in some areas. Not to mention, it makes me feel bad for believing you and supporting you.

Maybe you should at least read the second line. The whole point is when you work in a certain field long enough, you generally don't have to. I'm sure if an auto mechanic with years of experience started talking to you about cars, you wouldn't complain about him not having researched what he was saying. Bob's recognizing that he lacks knowledge in this area and is asking for others' experience and opinions.

Wait a moment, that is a form of research.

I bring that up because sometimes in his videos, especially his Game Overthinker videos which are much longer and all about looking into details, people keep picking out things wrong with his arguments, and I'm wondering if he knew about that stuff and just chose not to mention it or genuinely didn't know about it. Because if he did know about it and didn't mention it, it might be for the sake of proving his own argument, which is kind of cheap, really...

You know if you count Care Bears as a girl-oriented franchise (I always thought it was more gender neutral myself but whatever) I can actually see a decent movie being made out of it. If I remember correctly they didn't really have any big bad guy they were fighting, they were fighting despair and apathy. And that's pretty universal subject matter.

Granted, any sort of decent movie focusing on fighting despair and apathy would have to be hella depressing for it to work.

Yankeedoodles:
You know if you count Care Bears as a girl-oriented franchise (I always thought it was more gender neutral myself but whatever) I can actually see a decent movie being made out of it. If I remember correctly they didn't really have any big bad guy they were fighting, they were fighting despair and apathy. And that's pretty universal subject matter.

Granted, any sort of decent movie focusing on fighting despair and apathy would have to be hella depressing for it to work.

There was a bad guy in the show but I can't remember the name. I know his side kicks were Beastly and Shreiky.

Since a lot of the comments have been talking about the older girl shows, has anyone heard of the Strawberry Shortcake reboot? If I remember my radio story correctly, they're changing out the dresses for more modern outfits. Don't know whether show content has evolved plotwise.
Huh, ok, wiki says there were two reboots http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_2009_Strawberry_Shortcake_characters#2009

In any case I'm firmly a 90s child so I know next to nothing about the shows being discussed on the first couple comment pages. Seems to me that girl shows got a bit of a boost after stuff like Sailor Moon showed up. Time-wise I know there's a pretty big gap and I'm not sure what, if anything, filled it(maybe Cardcaptors? I never thought of it as girly, though looking at the Japanese art it probably was supposed to be), but for recent girl shows that had the characters really doing stuff you have Kim Possible, Totally Spies, Winx Club(practically an American Sailor Moon if you ask me and annoyingly valley girl) W.I.T.C.H, and maybe some others that I haven't seen due to lack of cable of not watching Saturday cartoons anymore.
Well...there was that Bratz(agh, the eyes) show, but I doubt it had any plots more complex than your average live action high/middle school teen drama.

Come to think of it, about half the girl shows I listed don't feel really American in nature, more like they got a lot of anime inspiration and without it would default to schlock like Bratz. That stuff really shouldn't be the American legacy of girls.

Blind Sight:
Um...Bob, lack of research isn't exactly something you should be proud of.

/pointless university student bitching (what, I like people to actually INFORM themselves before they start making claims)

As a man who used to watch Gilmore Girls and loved it, I hold no judgement against people embracing media directed at both genders.

Please, someone make a Baby Laughalot movie:

She's like a Great Old One, the sight of her drives people mad.

Props for liking Gilmore Girls, and for calling Bob out on being an arrogant douche, which he kind of is in nearly all of his videos, esspecailly when he's being negative about something. And now he has an actuall soap box with which to share his opinions, which to Bob means cold hard fact in his eyes. Eh, I'll go with it until he slags something off I feel strongly about and tells me I'm wrong for feeling that way.

"Mothers and daughters, they talk so fast but they talk so true" Turk - Scrubs.
Gilmore Girls movie!

Uhhhhhh....there was a reason I prefer Transformers to My Little Pony, stuff happened that was interesting and not a 'lesson on friendship' because one pony said something that hurt an others feelings and then having the whole episode be about that. Quite frankly, the 'Pink Aisle' is full of stuff that just wouldn't make a good movie. I mean, even Battleship has more potential than Strawberry Shortcake. It's basically the aisle of 'it looks nice, now collect the accessories'. There is no story, competition, or set-up for 'protagonist antagonist' conflict really. The only one I can think of would be Rainbow Bright, and even then only as a kids movie about Murkey and Lurky stealing colors from Rainbow Valley or whereever she lives, I just grabed that name from the Sonic universe. I don't even give enough of a crap to look up where she lives.

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