Where Do You Fall on the Fandom Spectrum?

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Obsessions, though, the kind that makes them wish every moment of their life was happening in this fictional world, can be seriously unhealthy. Are Twilight fans even on the same spectrum as people who argue over which Star Wars movie was the worst?

Now let's get serious for a moment... what sonic screwdriver are we talking about? The 3rd Doctor's, the 9/10 edition or the new version?

"Ask the 19-year-old me how she felt when The Phantom of the Opera hit movie theaters, and be prepared for a lot of profanity." I would love to see an article on this, but I suppose I'm the only one. D: I remember that I spent the entirety of the moving pointing out where they did things "wrong". Though, in retrospect, I suppose it could have been much worse on poor Erik. :(

I'm a very casual fan. I like stuff....a lot of stuff. why obsess over one thing when there's so much out there to see and do? if there's one thing that I may be a tad over protective about is my sports teams. I will defend my teams no matter how bad they suck(I'm looking at you Senators)

I am low maintenance fan. The reason is simple. By not diving deeply down into any giving fandom I can experience a lot more. So to speak.

I got a way to describe myself and it goes something like this: "If there is something that makes you a geek there is a good chance I have been into it at some time or another."

As for those three classifications I think it may be oversimplified but I suppose that is inevitable when trying to classify anything.

Great article; the sonic screw driver was to awesome a toy to pass up huh?

Incidentally, what does the 19 year old you think of Schumacher's Phantom of the Opera?

It's kind of rare to me to disagree with almost everything in an article I read.

Intellectual Fan > Emotional Fan. If you intellectually find something stimulating and with intelligence determine it's worth and judge it with intelligence then... I think you're a step or 50 above the emotional screaming narutard (not to point fingers).

The point is: intellectual fans find a reason to like something with intelligence, if you read a book for the first time and announce "THIS IS THE GREATEST BOOK EVER!" with no previous book-reading experience then you are an emotional fan.

Did I miss something or is this whole article just an attempt to justify being a fanboy/girl?

Hey! I liked Butler's Phantom!

Anyhoo, no. I don't think that people somehow deserve credit simply because they encountered something first. Also, if you indulge in too much escapism, your behaviour will become challenging (stalkers, depressives, dilusionals etc).

I like the trend of internet discussion however. Multiple perspectives in conflict is healthy. Crucible of truth yada yada...

bushwhacker2k:
It's kind of rare to me to disagree with almost everything in an article I read.

Intellectual Fan > Emotional Fan. If you intellectually find something stimulating and with intelligence determine it's worth and judge it with intelligence then... I think you're a step or 50 above the emotional screaming narutard (not to point fingers).

The point is: intellectual fans find a reason to like something with intelligence, if you read a book for the first time and announce "THIS IS THE GREATEST BOOK EVER!" with no previous book-reading experience then you are an emotional fan.

Did I miss something or is this whole article just an attempt to justify being a fanboy/girl?

I wouldn't say that. You're still going off the belief that one type of fan is better than the other.

Why does the intellectual fan have to be better than the emotional? Because he grew to like something that made him think as opposed to just entertaining him? That made him question his beliefs as opposed to making him admire how badass another character is? Seems kinda unfair if that's the case.

The real point of this article is that no fan is more superior than the other. Or at least they shouldn't be.

I myself like to place myself somewhere between obsessive and low maintenance.

I love Star Wars (I have the tattoo to prove it) but I don't visit star wars forums and can roll my eyes at whatever George Lucas is doing to ruin the franchise these days. Some people enjoy a book/film/play/game, others become obsessed, and these are the fans that in some ways end up ruining it for all.
Take for example Star Wars obsessive's. Because of their obsession, they go out and buy everything that the Star Wars logo gets slapped on. They watch the Clone Wars cartoons, buy the books and the Jar Jar Binks drinks cup. Instead of saying "Hey stop ruining my favourite films" their compulsion to own every thing Star Wars encourages every one at "Brand Lucas" to continue pumping out bad tie ins and half finished works (Clone Wars and The Force Unleashed II being my examples here)

I love Star Wars (I still have the tattoo to prove it) but I will not buy or watch anything produced after Ep III, I will enjoy the movies and ignore the rest, including the obsessive fans.

Elizabeth Grunewald:
The passion of the obsessive fan is a bit beyond my grasp, but it would be foolish to say this emotionally driven fan is any less legitimate than the intellectually driven one.

The emotional one tends to take things into emotional territory though, like anger, self-harm or depression. Intellectuals only usually sit their seething on forums about people who haven't heard of the first 8 Who's. ;)

If those Twihards are happy imagining Edward singing them to sleep every night, or what have you, let 'em. Similarly, I'll try not to bite your head off if you misquote early Simpsons episodes, or if you mix up your Muppet movies.

There is a difference though. People who delve into cosplay, fanfiction, or *shudder* slash are a lot better off than people who make decisions due to it. There are obvious parallels with religion here.

After all, I let Joel Schumacher live after Phantom came out, didn't I?

More than he deserved.

I can, and do, still get passionate about Who among other things, but I've never altered part of my life because of it. And that's what seems to happen with a number of the emotional fans. I can still say that Toshwood has a good plot occasionally *twitch* and the Doctor Who has had some god-awful plots in the past.

If someone doesn't want to watch it because "It's trash", then fair enough, not for them. But I dare you go back to the Twihard forums and criticize one iota of those books.

Quaxar:
Now let's get serious for a moment... what sonic screwdriver are we talking about? The 3rd Doctor's, the 9/10 edition or the new version?

There's been 8 so far. The First/Second Doctor shared one. Third had one. Fourth had a different one. Seventh/Eighth shared one in the film (though it may have just been a colour change). Ninth's one was used until the Tenth burnt it out on the xray machine. Next lasted until the Eleventh Hour. Penultimate was bitten in half by the Christmas Shark. And then there's the future one. At the moment there's not one in the concurrent timeline.

If it's the shop bought one, it probably resembles Mark VI.

Yeah, no.

Appreciation, obsession and fetishisation are different things and they are not equal. What a bland article to ignore this in favor of bland "let's all get along" paste.

You see this attitude in a lot of areas, though. It's one of my biggest frustrations with being an English major, particularly the creative writing courses. I can't even get a proper evaluation of my work unless I play their game, and everything I've learned in school about writing has been obtained by either sifting between the lines or learning what not to do. A subject that's partially titled "creative" shouldn't exclude everything and anyone's ideas that fall outside of "serious fiction." As much as I personally like pursuing the intellectual side of fandom, I like having people who I can talk to about a subject on any level.

I saw Phantom of the Opera on Broadway early last year, and as a major fan of the musical I refuse to see it again until they change the main cast.
Bare minimum: new Christine. I don't know who thought that interpretation of her character was a good idea.

putowtin:
I love Star Wars (I have the tattoo to prove it) but I don't visit star wars forums and can roll my eyes at whatever George Lucas is doing to ruin the franchise these days. Some people enjoy a book/film/play/game, others become obsessed, and these are the fans that in some ways end up ruining it for all.
Take for example Star Wars obsessive's. Because of their obsession, they go out and buy everything that the Star Wars logo gets slapped on. They watch the Clone Wars cartoons, buy the books and the Jar Jar Binks drinks cup. Instead of saying "Hey stop ruining my favourite films" their compulsion to own every thing Star Wars encourages every one at "Brand Lucas" to continue pumping out bad tie ins and half finished works (Clone Wars and The Force Unleashed II being my examples here)

I love Star Wars (I still have the tattoo to prove it) but I will not buy or watch anything produced after Ep III, I will enjoy the movies and ignore the rest, including the obsessive fans.

Wait what? clone wars cartoon a bad tie in?! as in the 2003 clone wars cartoon as opposed to the 2008 the clone wars animation? are you all there man? the 2003 clone wars were pretty epic.. I think you're getting your clone wars mixed up :)

Also the current animated series ain't all that bad when you give it a chance.. I mean it started off rocky but is pretty solid now... I mean TNG started off with Encounter at Farpoint

Also the franchise wasn't just ruined now... it started with the OT..I mean there was that ewok cartoon.. oh and lets not forget... wait more like lets just forget the christmas special ever took place...

Well, I'm not obsessed with any one thing, but I've got a low maintenance finer appreciation for a few things. And a tattoo bearing some other things that go a little beyond a casual appreciation.

I'll have a nerd off and win with anyone over Halo.

But then, Halo Cannon is so totally screeeeewed up, that's it's pretty hard to firmly establish.

I don't think I've ever been obsessive enough to count into this type of fandom.

Though I want a sonic screwdriver.

I enjoy a lot of franchises. I'm a fan of them. Not sure I can do much more than critique them as a fan, though.I'll never go to war over which Trek is superior, or try and kill someone who enjoys Attack of the Clones. And while I miss the Tenth Doctor, I'm not holding a candle light vigil.

I wouldn't say that one type is a better fan than the other, but someone with a genuinely intellectual understanding of something (I don't mean just knowing minutia, I mean someone who is able to do something genuinely academic with their interest) has probably achieved a lot more with the time they spent on it than someone who just whiled their life away obsessing over the thing. The same is true of people who use their interests as a springboard for new and creative artistic endeavors of their own. In other words: there's no such thing as being a better fan, but there is such a thing as being a better human being. There's also a big difference between someone who is a fan of Stephanie Myer (a hack who can't even use words correctly) and someone who is a fan of Lu Xun (one of the greatest writers in modern Chinese history, a significant part of of whose work remains untranslated).

Personally, I tend to be slightly obsessive and retain details well, but I never get so wrapped up in my hobbies that I lose sight of my goals or stop trying to create something meaningful. I feel that I can be critical enough of my own interests that I can actually gains something valuable from them rather than just putting something on a pedestal.

Sorry, accidental double post.

All hail the Doctor!

Seriously, fans are fans because something about their chosen material resonates within them. It's like if something sudden explained everything about how you thought and felt and it gave you such a sense of kinship that you felt it had been created just for you.

Though these classifications can work on a certain level, for me there will always be two types of people. Fans and fanatics.

Being a fan is not a problem at all - everyone is a fan on some level or another of one thing or another. Heck, you can be a fan of potato salad and I'd consider that to be just as valid as being a fan of Star Trek because it's not about the subject matter itself - it's moreso about what your love for the subject matter tells others about yourself. But above all else what makes a fan such to me is that they know never to rely on any one of their fandoms much! Potato salad is good, but if I see someone binging on it well...I tend to think twice about them. And the same stands for being a fan of fiction really.

I, for example, like a good amount of the Star Wars mythos. But if someone decides to tell me of how the Clone Wars canon officially 'overrides' some of the stuff I might happen to like, I think to myself "So what? Just like whatever you like about Star Wars and I'll like what I like about it." You can quote me all the freaking G-Canon and C-Canon sources in the world, but if I liked something that is overriden by that through official canon, it'll stay in my head as the thing that happened regardless of what someone in a position of authority says otherwise. And I've never lacked finding people who think in a similarly relaxed way that I do. In fact you'd be surprised that the number of these types of fans is far higher than most assume, though the internet for example can warp that perspective beautifully because these types of fans aren't *nearly* as loud as the other type.

On the other hand there are the fanatics. If anything defines these people it's the fact that they just can't let go of their subject matter. It's like trying to pull a stick out of a dog's mouth. Either it has the elitists bludgeoning others with canon to death so as to stroke their own egoes, regardless of how important that peice of canon actually is to get everyone onto the same page, or it has the obsessives going on drama binges when you tell them that you don't think much of their favorite part of whatever they adore. It doesn't matter much in the end, because *both* types lack any kind of perspective of the fact that hey...the stuff they're a fan of isn't all that important in their life! It's just a *part* of life, so get over it already!

I think it's safe to say that I've grown tired of talking about things I'm a fan of though, or if I do it I am very careful about the person with whom I happen to talk about it. Because either the loss of perspective in the case of fanatics or ultimately not much to talk about in the case of fans tends to guarantee that the discussion would be unsatisfying. There are a few fans out there, who can actually fall into a comfortable medium zone too I guess, but they are very few and far between indeed.

The term "fan" originated in the world of sports. From Wiki

Paul Dickson, in his Dickson Baseball Dictionary, cites William Henry Nugent's work that claims it comes from fancy, a 19th century term from England that referred mainly to followers of boxing. According to that unsupported explanation, it was originally shortened to fance then just to the homonym fans. However, Merriam-Webster, the Oxford dictionary and other recognized sources define it as a shortened version of the word fanatic, and the word did first become popular in reference to an enthusiastic follower of a baseball team. (Fanatic itself, introduced into English around 1550, means "marked by excessive enthusiasm and often intense uncritical devotion". It comes from the Modern Latin fanaticus, meaning "insanely but divinely inspired". The word originally pertained to a temple or sacred place [Latin fanum, poetic English fane]. The modern sense of "extremely zealous" dates from around 1647; the use of fanatic as a noun dates from 1650.) However, the term "fancy" for an intense liking of something, while being of a different etymology, coincidentally carries a less intense but somewhat similar connotation to "fanatic". The word emerged as an Americanism around 1889.

I'm a fanboy when it comes to Star Wars. I used to be able to say I knew EVERYTHING about Star Wars, but then the prequels came out, and the universe expanded even more, and stuff started not making sense or changing, that I only follow events that take place after Return of the Jedi. Anything before A New Hope doesn't interest me enough to commit it to solid memory, but I still follow it. Basically, I can give anyone the rundown on pretty much any major character that survived Return of the Jedi, and I'm proud of it. I don't beat people over the head, but if they ask me a question, they better be prepared to listen.

I'm a fan of other stuff, like Naruto, Negima!, video games, etc. But Star Wars is my badge of honor. Different types of fans don't bother me--it's fun to come across someone else who is in to something as much as I am--until they start beating people over the head with information or because said person disagreed with them.

People don't realize that what makes a great book isn't complicated words or great literature skills but it's how the author gets emotions out of you and creates the characters and invokes human emotion.

Twilight is actually art because it gets emotion out of people and even though I don't like it Edward Cullen is actually a good character because Stephenie Meyer managed to create the stereotypical dream boy that girls like in television shows and other media.

It's too bad the movies couldn't improve on how boring the books are (I know it's made for teenage girls but why can't they try and appeal to other people as well and change the plot a bit? Even Stephenie Meyer thought of letting them change it...seriously the plot in the first book being the only book I read was fucking boring)

EDIT: I'm a big fan of Mass Effect and Star Wars and know a lot about their universes, just finished reading all the Mass Effect books.

EDITEDIT: I think Twilight is an interesting film because it's the first film in awhile that has been really memorable to people and created such a large fan base, maybe it's because of all the books it has behind it or because of it's target fan base but it's still pretty fucking weird that it managed to get so many fans and inspired so many young girls to read which in itself is a good thing

My problem with fans (at least the hardcore ones) is they try and force their views on whats considered good on everyone else and pity the poor sod who dares to disagree. I'm one of those weird people who thought the prequal trilogy was entertaining, some of the Ulimate Marval line is a decent read and Star Trek: Voyager is perfectly good TV. However, if I was to mention any of this on a related forum (hell, even here its dangerous) I would be told that my own personal view is somehow wrong.

Ah yes, Joel Schumaker. But Elizabeth, we must remind ourselves that ALW was looking for 'an actor who could sing, not a singer who could act'. If he'd had any sense, he would have got Anthony Warlow to play the role like any SENSIBLE person would. Failing that, he would talk Michael Crawford back into the role. Butler was a terrible choice of Phantom for a number of reasons but the one that topped my list was the fact they had to transpose the role because he didn't have the range to...

Aw damn. Yeah, I'm a "phan". That said, at least I'm a fairly well-researched fan and can see the point to the film.

But the point from the article is valid. Some fans are far too emotional. I know that people often mistake my outrageous love of something to be serious, but I take great delight in just pretending to be completely bonkers about certain fandoms (deep breath, Twilight does not make that list).

I'm the kind of guy who get's deep into lore, will argue lore, and will get deeply offended when creator's "fuck up their own lore", but even I have some of my restraints.

For example, I can rant all day and night about how Blizzard completely raped the storyline from Burning Crusade onwards, but I'm still nowhere near the level of the infamous "Red Shirt Guy".

Recently I've gotten really into Spoony's videos about the Highlander series because he pretty much sums up the entire fanbase's feelings towards the series. The only thing that really separates our opinion is that I actually got really into the cartoon series for a while, and it wasn't really that bad. Having said that, I had no idea of the existence of the Jaguar game, nor have I seen the anime.

Sometimes I do get so into something that I'll memorize backstory and behind-the-scenes info and can get very encyclopedic with it, like with the Metal Gear series; to the point where I'm heavily considering either a FOXHOUND or Militaires Sans Frontieres tattoo.

Let's see how many people can get "full credit" on this question.

Space marine armour save?

Most, however, contained threads such as, "which Cullen bit you and where?" "Sweetest Moments aka I so wish I was Bella right now moments," "Do you think vampires have sex?," "what is your best qutation [sic] in twilight," and "WHAT WILL U DO IF U'VE GOT A MAIL FROM EDWARD CULLEN...?"

So what you're saying here is that the Twilight forums are remarkably similar to a lot of dross thread on the Escapist, if you were to replace the words 'Edward' and 'vampire' with 'avatar' and 'game'?

Yeah, I can see your point - fans are depressingly similar everywhere :-(

In Soviet Russia,

Pariahwulfen:
Space marine armour save

YOU!

What do I win?

Obviously, I agree entirely with this article. Emotional fans are just different than intellectual fans, and obsessive fans, etc. Just as long as we all like it for the same reasons, it doesn't matter to which part of our psyche those reasons appeal.

But, I'm sure we can all agree that other people who like what you like for the wrong reasons are harmful to what you love, and entirely deserving of every ounce of your vitriol. Right? They should burn for their sins! BURN!!

In terms of the article's fan spectrum I fall somewhere in between obsessive and low-maintenance. The are some things, video games in particular, that I really like but very rarely freak out over. Then there's movies and music. OBSESSED over music and movies, not so much in terms of collecting related things but just possessing encyclopedic knowledge.

But yeah, compared to some Twilight fans I would come off like a poser.

You know, compared to Wagner fans, SF/Gamer fans are just pikers. Heck, I got actually yelled at once for saying I liked parts of the Ring of Nibelungen. Apparently, TRUE Wagnerian fans just call it "The Ring".

My point, and I do have one, is that any form of art will have its fanbase. For the most part, fans are cool people. Well, cool by the definition of "stuff I like" as opposed to James Dean. They have a certain unabashed love of something that is so lacking in our modern cynical culture.

But fandom goes bad when fans start traipsing down the ingroup/outgroup path. When you actually believe you're better than someone else for having read more of a series, you need to seriously rexamine your outlook on life. Remember when you first read that book? Wasn't it fun? Why not try to go back to that earlier you? Or better yet, find another series/game/book that is equally wonderful. Trust me, they're out there.

I'm part of the 9 fandom and that thing has mutated into some human-looking dolls with stitchmarks and filled with blatant sexually. All this coming from a film based after a short that was meant to show alchemy in a different view.

I'm afraid of mankind at times...

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