291: Secrets of the Guild

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Secrets of the Guild

The Guildhall at SMU, the country's foremost graduate program for videogame design, is sort of like Hogwarts for game designers - but with more energy drinks and pictures of Batman.

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This sounds like the god-damn Promised Land. I'm not even interested in being an artist or developer and I want to go there.

Though a place like this is something the medium needs if we want it to progress to a truly undeniable art form.

I, like a good 40% of the people here i assume, WANT to make video games. I have ideas in my head that i want to express and i believe that Video games are the perfect artistic medium to portray them. Hence, i would not be pleased if i never got a shot at working in the industry because i may never hold a degree from this one particular school.

I don't mean to demean SMU, but i think the ultimate goal of video games, as with any artform, should be to allow as many people, ordinary people, possible to directly contribute to the industry. It's happened with Books (anyone can, theoretically, pick up a pen and start writing a book), and film (who doesn't have a video camera and an Youtube account?). So why not Games?

I mean sure, you have the odd Markus Persson and the Braid guy who hit the jackpot, but if the gaming culture has to expand: it has to expand through it's community..... not from it.

It really does sound like some sort of heaven, and this from another one who isn't interested in being an artist (though gods know I was once) or a developer. A few more of these dotted around the world would go down nicely, I think.

How do I sign up?

GrizzlerBorno:
I, like a good 40% of the people here i assume, WANT to make video games. I have ideas in my head that i want to express and i believe that Video games are the perfect artistic medium to portray them. Hence, i would not be pleased if i never got a shot at working in the industry because i may never hold a degree from this one particular school.

I don't mean to demean SMU, but i think the ultimate goal of video games, as with any artform, should be to allow as many people, ordinary people, possible to directly contribute to the industry. It's happened with Books (anyone can, theoretically, pick up a pen and start writing a book), and film (who doesn't have a video camera and an Youtube account?). So why not Games?

I mean sure, you have the odd Markus Persson and the Braid guy who hit the jackpot, but if the gaming culture has to expand: it has to expand through it's community..... not from it.

I understand where you're coming from, and by your enthusiasm I can tell you understand just how complex games are and therefore will understand that games are much more difficult to create than any of those other mediums. There are many tools that aid people with no programming knowledge to dabble in game design but none of them are even close to the ease with which someone can pick up a pen, camera or even an instrument (which is definitely the most complex).

Until those barriers are brought down, we're not going to see that kind of spontaneous talent that comes other mediums and if we want well-made games, we're going to have to rely on programs like Guildhall and Digipen to create talented designers.

P.S.: I love your avatar.

____

To the article I'd like to say that this place sounds fantastic, but unfortunately I wrote off this place pretty quickly because I'm an athiest and a snob. Which would make me hesitant to go to a place called Southern Methodist University and Texas, respectively. I am, however, accepted to Digipen and I think I'll look forward to working with designers that have graduated from Guildhall.

@ Grizzler: The gate to the game industry is difficult to get over if you don't have the skills and best practices to both gain entrance and succeed in it. Ten years ago, the "Community" entrance path was a lot more viable. Tools and processes were more accessible to potential designers and artists. The Guildhall exists to give graduates the skills to vault that gate ... and to overcome Sturgeon's Law, which basically says "90% of everything is crap."

@ Prophetic Heresy: Unfortunately, you let your prejudices keep you from an exceptional educational experience. The Guildhall program is not on the main campus, has no faith-based education components or teachings, and has embraced students of all belief backgrounds ... including snobs (you might want to ditch that attitude before you try to get a job though).

Paul Jaquays
Founding Guildmaster
Lead Level Designer for CCP NA

Prophetic Heresy:
[quote="GrizzlerBorno" post="6.261942.9875568"]
... I wrote off this place pretty quickly because I'm an athiest and a snob. Which would make me hesitant to go to a place called Southern Methodist University and Texas...

Don't let the name fool you, religion is not part of the Guildhall's curriculum, and no one is "frowned upon" for being atheist. I know I'm not.

Why does this place have to all the way down it Texas? :(

Paul Jaquays:
@ Prophetic Heresy: Unfortunately, you let your prejudices keep you from an exceptional educational experience. The Guildhall program is not on the main campus, has no faith-based education components or teachings, and has embraced students of all belief backgrounds ... including snobs (you might want to ditch that attitude before you try to get a job though).

Paul Jaquays
Founding Guildmaster
Lead Level Designer for CCP NA

DarK SouL:
Don't let the name fool you, religion is not part of the Guildhall's curriculum, and no one is "frowned upon" for being atheist. I know I'm not.

Don't worry about that, it was meant to self deprecative humor not disrespect to the Guildhall or the Lone Star state (well...maybe the state).

From the article:

Robert Rath:
As a result, The Guildhall was designed to simulate the pace and work style of the games industry. During heavy development periods, students sometimes spend up to twenty hours a day coding, designing, fixing, debugging. Walk into the project development rooms and you'll find mini-fridges full of energy drinks. "It's important," he insists. "People always talk about the cruelty of military training, or of giving doctors 24 hour shifts during their residencies, but it's not out of cruelty. That's done because one day you will be called upon to work under extreme conditions and you need to be prepared."

Simulated crunch? 20-hour lab time? Energy drinks instead of more healthy chow? Horrible. Sounds like a school that reinforces the worst practices in the electronic entertainment development industry: crunch schedules, long shifts, and bad diet. I understand the need to prepare students for the harsh gauntlet that they've wanted to devote their lives to, but there is a distinction between extreme training and preparedness, and going too far. On the subject of training: training is often more harsh than day-to-day activities, but sometimes there are situations that are 10x more taxing than training, and I understand the need for preparedness. Practices and habits learned in training remain after training, including bad practices.

I like how the article goes from one quality-of-life issue (extreme working conditions) to another (look how pretty the offices are!) in a paragraph, and continues to describe the facilities for two.

The survey for the professors sounds interesting: "Why do you teach here?" Some other relevant questions would be:
"Have you authored or substantially participated in the development of any entertainment software during your lifetime?"
"In what ways have you utilized the medium of games to communicate a message worth seeing or hearing?"
"Why aren't you making games right now?"
I'm sure people have heard the axiom: "Those who cannot do, teach."

I'll end on a wild and unverified assumption: the most admirable game developers were self-taught and were not churned out through a digital entertainment school. I challenge anyone to refute my claim, although my hypothesis is somewhat irresponsible without verification. There's a good chance that I am right, but in a way I want to be wrong.

"It's done when it's done."

GrizzlerBorno:

I don't mean to demean SMU, but i think the ultimate goal of video games, as with any artform, should be to allow as many people, ordinary people, possible to directly contribute to the industry. It's happened with Books (anyone can, theoretically, pick up a pen and start writing a book), and film (who doesn't have a video camera and an Youtube account?). So why not Games?

I mean sure, you have the odd Markus Persson and the Braid guy who hit the jackpot, but if the gaming culture has to expand: it has to expand through it's community..... not from it.

You can. Check out Yoyogames Game Maker. http://www.yoyogames.com/make

Admittedly the games it can make are pretty tame, compared to big budget masterworks with big dev teams, but the interface is easy enough, and someone with little literacy training's first novel isn't going to be that great in terms of language or prose, is it? Same thing here.

@Michael O'Hair ... you bring up a number of good points.

Simulated Crunch - This is not an "Ivory Tower" program. When you simulate a real working environment, you also simulate real working conditions. Meaning demanding schedules in which you have to both learn what you are doing and then do it. The program prepares students to plan, to scope, to re-scope, and to think on their feet when the plan meets the process. It has a limited amount of time to do this. That's why it's also a graduate level program ... no time-sharing of education with non-game development classes. It is boot camp for game developers.

The curricula and the team projects were designed by working game development professionals in order to instruct and improve the craft and the industry.

Regarding the instruction staff - one of requirements to teach at Guildhall is hands on experience making games. They often come from the companies in the Dallas area and are backed up by part time adjunct instructors who continue work at those companies. Plus, many local developers are involved with the school. Just as the Guildhall curriculum is structured to teach the process of making games, the faculty are expected to have been there and done that. Faculty are here because they believe in passing their own craft skills and knowlege along to the students. In the process, they also develop and hone their owns skills (want to improve your skills at something ... teach it). The majority of the faculty eventually return to game industry as stronger developers.

There are certainly a number of admirable, self-taught game developers out there ... men and women who started in the industry at a time when gameplay, code, graphics, and audio could all be done by one person. They were force of nature hobbyists. I'm sure we could both name some of the same people. But that was then and this is now. There's certainly room for folks following that kind of path today ... and I know a few folks who have come in that way recently. But the reality is, most folks trying that today are going to get lost in the shuffle. Good game schools provide the opportunity to learn how not to get lost AND provide the networking connections that are crucial to getting in.

"It's done when it's done" is a great mantra for the future unemployed.

Paul Jaquays:
Simulated Crunch - This is not an "Ivory Tower" program. When you simulate a real working environment, you also simulate real working conditions.

You mean "simulate a really crappy working environment". There is no excuse for crunching. Evidence shows it is detrimental on multiple levels, including productivity. If there's anything crunch-related students should learn, it is how to not fuck up their scheduling and/or slack off to such a degree that they have to work around the clock before the deadline - maybe if the old-timers knew this stuff better, the whole crunch culture would have never developed in the industry. Crunching should be punished in schoolwork gradings due to how it would harm the long-term productivity of a real studio. *That* is realism for you.

Nutcase:

Paul Jaquays:
Simulated Crunch - This is not an "Ivory Tower" program. When you simulate a real working environment, you also simulate real working conditions.

You mean "simulate a really crappy working environment". There is no excuse for crunching. Evidence shows it is detrimental on multiple levels, including productivity. If there's anything crunch-related students should learn, it is how to not fuck up their scheduling and/or slack off to such a degree that they have to work around the clock before the deadline - maybe if the old-timers knew this stuff better, the whole crunch culture would have never developed in the industry. Crunching should be punished in schoolwork gradings due to how it would harm the long-term productivity of a real studio. *That* is realism for you.

I don't think I've had an actual 20 hour working day, ever. I've been in the Navy for 12 years, and the closest I can claim is 90 days of 19 hour working days. I'm pretty sure that anyone who survives this course is doing it for nothing but love, because they're not doing it for any other reason.

good piece.

but it needs pictures

vxicepickxv:
]I don't think I've had an actual 20 hour working day, ever. I've been in the Navy for 12 years, and the closest I can claim is 90 days of 19 hour working days. I'm pretty sure that anyone who survives this course is doing it for nothing but love, because they're not doing it for any other reason.

As a graduate of the Guildhall, I can say this is the case with every one of the hardest working former classmates I've worked with. Crunch is an unfortunate reality in this industry, but I've found that a lot of those students who put in those 20-hour workdays and gave up hobbies like personal life and games to build their portfolios/master's projects would spend what was left of their spare time getting together and working on personal side projects simply because they love this kind of work. I'd hate to see someone invest that kind of money in a program, only to become burnt out shortly after finding their first industry job because it ultimately wasn't the career they wanted. One of the best benefits of The Guildhall, I've found, is the friends you make who become great colleagues and contacts around the industry later on.

That said, I've been through both army training and the Defense Language Institute cram school, and The Guildhall stands as the craziest program to explode my brain. Was pretty fun, though. 0:

@Nutcase - Out curiousity. Do you now or did you ever work in the digital game industry? Do you still work in it? Did you work for more than one employer or on more than one project?Has your life actually been damaged by "crunch?" Do you have stories you can share? You don't need to out yourself or reveal employer specific details.

I choose to work in the game industry. It's what I know and love and has been my career long enough for me to be one of those clueless old-timers. Every digital game development company that I have ever worked for has required some kind of crunch time, ranging from scheduled pushes at the end of a milestone deadline, to months-long unmanaged "death marches" brought on by poor decision making. I don't love EXTENDED crunch periods, but managed crunch time not only can bring in projects under deadline (or ensure that features are completed, rather than dropped), but can also be a morale builder, if handled properly.

The Guildhall sets an agressive schedule for the students. Regardless of what discipline a student chooses, there is a phenomenal amount of material to be learned and put into practice. What students take away from the school is proportional to the time and effort they put in. There is little room for the slacker mentality that some feel permeates the game industry. Not at the school and definitely not in the industry ... at least not for those who make of a career of it.

The student work available to be seen on the site is damn impressive in a lot of instances. I'm mostly curious though about the ethics courses mentioned and what really gets covered in them.

Nice article but lacking content, perhaps likening it to Hogwarts is not the best place to start, gives a perhaps incorrect impression of an idyll.

shouldn't the goals and work of the SMU program for game design be the kind of thing ALL schools all over the world in EVERY field should be doing?

This is supremely frustrating.

What do I get for a BA in economics in four years? A fucking piece of paper. What do they get in 2? 1-5 year industry experience.

Bullshit.

Paul Jaquays:
@Nutcase - Out curiousity. Do you now or did you ever work in the digital game industry? Do you still work in it? Did you work for more than one employer or on more than one project?Has your life actually been damaged by "crunch?" Do you have stories you can share? You don't need to out yourself or reveal employer specific details.

I have worked in mobile games and a middleware company. I currently do non-game application development under tight deadlines. I have never been in crunch mode and would not work in a company where it was the norm. I can understand unforeseen circumstances leading to people doing 60 hours for a few weeks or something, but even then of course I would expect to be fully compensated for it. In my current work it's rare we do overtime at all.

Like I said, research shows that over a longer time anything over 50 hours per week doesn't even help in producing more. It's merely stupid for everyone involved.

I choose to work in the game industry. It's what I know and love and has been my career long enough for me to be one of those clueless old-timers. Every digital game development company that I have ever worked for has required some kind of crunch time, ranging from scheduled pushes at the end of a milestone deadline, to months-long unmanaged "death marches" brought on by poor decision making. I don't love EXTENDED crunch periods, but managed crunch time not only can bring in projects under deadline (or ensure that features are completed, rather than dropped), but can also be a morale builder, if handled properly.

I have worked and made people work long periods under all kinds of stress, sleep deprivation and overall discomfort. That was in the army, and it had a purpose: teaching people mental toughness with which to maintain minimal effectiveness in crappy circumstances which cannot be prevented. Anything other than that is most efficiently done in full health and comfort, fully rested and fed. There are no truly uncontrollable circumstances in software development, just unprofessionalism and fuck-ups.

Frankly, it sounds to me like Guildhall is perpetuating low expectations and stupid ways of working for no reason, and in doing so, setting up its students for exploitation.

Sounds like tuition would cost more money than I'll likely ever see.

It's actually a good idea. If you go to school to get into an industry, that school should be like the industry. This is true in any field, but especially in something like game design of which so much skill is based on actual experience. This makes people who are very good in this industry field. Does this mean it makes good game designers? It's not the same thing. But I'm sure it produces more than its fair share.

If crunch is a standard in the industry, it would be against Guildhall's purpose to not include it in the program. Too bad that by including it, it does in some way condone it.

HankMan:
Why does this place have to all the way down it Texas? :(

better question:

why does this place have to be all the way up in USA?

teh_Canape:

HankMan:
Why does this place have to all the way down it Texas? :(

better question:

why does this place have to be all the way up in USA?

Even better question:

Why does this place not exist in my own home?

Nutcase:
... research shows that over a longer time anything over 50 hours per week doesn't even help in producing more. It's merely stupid for everyone involved. ... perpetuating low expectations and stupid ways of working for no reason, and in doing so, setting up its students for exploitation.

I've worked in the industry for many years and am now an instructor at a similar game school, and I agree with you completely. People within the industry need to fight the senseless practice of "crunch" and work toward creating more efficient practices and better-organized scheduling. Every time a team has an extended crunch, it shows the project has undergone failures. I warn my students that crunch is a likely possibility, but I don't force them to endure it in preparation of that possibility. I'd rather spend my time encouraging them to help the industry grow in its maturity and stability by resisting antiquated conventions, and educate them on all the reasons why crunch doesn't work.

I am an aspiring film director/video game director (either one is fine to me, hoenstly), so I will definitely look into this school.

Some other posters do raise a good point, however, with the "crunch time"mentality. In my opinion, I think the games industry needs a good overhaul in it's development procedure. As far as I know, there is no "Pre/Pro/Post-Production" procedure system in video games. There's "Alpha/Beta/Gold" phases, but those steps and what happens in them can vary drastically from developer to developer. Having to constantly to "crunch time" doesn't make for a good situation.

BizRodian:
It's actually a good idea. If you go to school to get into an industry, that school should be like the industry. This is true in any field

Nope.

If crunch is a standard in the industry, it would be against Guildhall's purpose to not include it in the program. Too bad that by including it, it does in some way condone it.

Wrong. You can't learn to be a "better cruncher". All it means is staying at work stupidly late and not getting paid for it. What can be taught is scheduling and project planning that prevents having to overwork at the end.

If the school is resigned to the idea that its students will crunch in the future no matter what, then what the school should do to prepare them is to teach them normally, plus train their physical fitness because that, unlike "practicing crunching", actually helps to lessen the effects of stress and fatigue. Only slightly, but still.

bobisimo:
I've worked in the industry for many years and am now an instructor at a similar game school, and I agree with you completely. People within the industry need to fight the senseless practice of "crunch" and work toward creating more efficient practices and better-organized scheduling. Every time a team has an extended crunch, it shows the project has undergone failures. I warn my students that crunch is a likely possibility, but I don't force them to endure it in preparation of that possibility. I'd rather spend my time encouraging them to help the industry grow in its maturity and stability by resisting antiquated conventions, and educate them on all the reasons why crunch doesn't work.

Thank you for the work you do for your students and the industry as a whole.

I believe it's also important for game developers to have a good idea about what the wages, working conditions and best practices for someone of their skillset are outside the game industry. No matter how much you love games, if things are bad enough, jumping ship is likely the most effective way to both improve your conditions and force the studio to think about changing their ways.

... Two years left of high school. Must continue superior grade average. Must get into good university. Must fucking ace development course.

Must attend this school.

Drake_Dercon:
... Two years left of high school. Must continue superior grade average. Must get into good university. Must fucking ace development course.

Must attend this school.

Boy, you've just listed all of my concerns in a good 3 statements >_< God, the future never slows the fuck down, does it?

Nutcase:

BizRodian:
It's actually a good idea. If you go to school to get into an industry, that school should be like the industry. This is true in any field

Nope.

If crunch is a standard in the industry, it would be against Guildhall's purpose to not include it in the program. Too bad that by including it, it does in some way condone it.

Wrong. You can't learn to be a "better cruncher". All it means is staying at work stupidly late and not getting paid for it. What can be taught is scheduling and project planning that prevents having to overwork at the end.

If the school is resigned to the idea that its students will crunch in the future no matter what, then what the school should do to prepare them is to teach them normally, plus train their physical fitness because that, unlike "practicing crunching", actually helps to lessen the effects of stress and fatigue. Only slightly, but still.

I don't believe that "conditioning students to accept crunch" is exactly the reason why crunch exists at the GH. For the most part, it's a simple matter of having only the duration an 18-month program (I think it might be something like 22 months now) to learn a trade often time completely from nothing.

An artist, for example, may have had no knowledge of 3d modeling, Photoshop or digital art at all when they started. I had never modeled a single object before, and had no knowledge of the game development pipeline. But by the time you are five or six months out from graduating, you need to have not only gained those foundational skills, but developed into an artist who can not only compete with experienced professionals, but have built up a solid portfolio to prove it. It's only in the last few months that you may be strong enough in your skills to create work worth showing to a recruiter, and the students find that it's when they're busiest with their MIT testing, final game projects, and the rest of their courses.

We have specific courses on rapid application development, the pros and cons of different lifecycle models and the best practices/mistakes that lead to crunch, death marches, and failed projects. But in the end, if you really want to get a job and compete with experienced people with shipped titles and awesome skills, you have to be willing to put in as much time as you must. Especially in this economic state, and with so many talented people laid off from their jobs. It's not simply about accepting that you'll be exploited in some way and that you must get used to it before it even starts. I think just about everyone knows that extended crunch is terrible, destroys morale and does little to improve productivity. Except maybe for those who find it necessary to require it, anyway v:

Jumplion:

Drake_Dercon:
snipped because of embarrassing statement.

Boy, you've just listed all of my concerns in a good 3 statements >_< God, the future never slows the fuck down, does it?

Yeah, that didn't come out right.

My whole idea is that where I live (that would be Canada in general), there aren't really any good schools geared towards video game design. Then, reading this article, I found a "dream school". Your concerns are quite important, I admit, but I personally have turned out most of my best work while working through fatigue (and not stopping long enough to lose where I left off). The whole idea of working through the crunch, for me, is a fantastic one because my own thought process functions better when I don't give it time to stop or become distracted.

I also recognize that it's not for everyone and different people work better under different circumstances. I was merely stating that for my personal path, this seems a great option.

bobisimo:

Nutcase:
... research shows that over a longer time anything over 50 hours per week doesn't even help in producing more. It's merely stupid for everyone involved. ... perpetuating low expectations and stupid ways of working for no reason, and in doing so, setting up its students for exploitation.

I've worked in the industry for many years and am now an instructor at a similar game school, and I agree with you completely. People within the industry need to fight the senseless practice of "crunch" and work toward creating more efficient practices and better-organized scheduling. Every time a team has an extended crunch, it shows the project has undergone failures. I warn my students that crunch is a likely possibility, but I don't force them to endure it in preparation of that possibility. I'd rather spend my time encouraging them to help the industry grow in its maturity and stability by resisting antiquated conventions, and educate them on all the reasons why crunch doesn't work.

I notice a lot of people questioning the Guildhall's use of crunch as part of the curriculum. I think that an important point about that is being missed here. Namely, that crunch is a necessary evil for a student.

For the record, I also am a Guildhall graduate who is now gainfully employed at a AAA studio as a designer/scripter. In fact, ChemicalAlia and I were in the same cohort (C11 represent). I also had little-to-no experience in level design prior to attending.

No one here is trying to argue that crunch is a good thing, or that it's an optimal (if sometimes necessary) working condition. Here are a couple of things to consider, though:

1) Anyone who goes to the Guildhall is extremely passionate about making games. In fact, during the admissions process one thing that they try to make sure of is that the people who start the program are certain about this. This isn't a program for people who think that making games "sounds like it could be pretty cool." It's for people who know that what they want to do more than anything is work in this industry. Keeping this fact in mind,

2) Guildhall is an arms race. Now, I met some great people while attending--people I'm delighted to call my friends--but at the end of the day I knew that, along with everyone else in in the mod community and other experienced devs, these friends were also my competition. So while it was always friendly and everyone was ALWAYS helpful, everyone's constantly trying to top each other.

Combine extreme passion with heightened competition, and suddenly this thought starts popping into your head on a regular basis: "Aw crap. It's midnight. Now, technically I am done with this assignment, but I bet if I did [something] it would be so much better...plus I bet [classmate] is still up working." Next thing you know it's 12:50PM and you're racing to zip up and submit your assignment that's due at 1PM. That or you're working on a group project and you think to yourself, "Yeah, I could stop now, but it's not the best level it could be. I feel like I'd be letting my teammates down if I didn't do everything that I could." No sleep yet, and you've got another thing due the next day. Rinse, repeat. "Should I keep going?" ceases to be an issue, and it becomes more a question of "Can I keep going?" If yes, keep going.

For the record, the Guildhall NEVER forces people to work any certain amount of hours outside of class. There is no "20-hour lab time." In fact, the building shuts down at 1AM to encourage students to stop working for the day (a policy we'd bemoan and petition to change over and over again to no avail). They do, however, give you plenty of work. Some students could call it quits at midnight and be perfectly happy with what they've done. The rest of us got hired. Ultimately, the guy sitting across from us in the interview wasn't going to know or care how much sleep we needed to get while finishing whatever portfolio piece. All he cares about is how good your stuff is when compared to everybody else's that's out there.

So yeah, there's crunch, but it's self-induced 99.9% of the time (as Drew Murray would say, "Hard Work > Talent"). The students at the Guildhall are passionate about making games and want to work in this industry literally more than just about anything. This can easily translate to "I will work insane hours to achieve my goal." At the same time, my tenure there contains some of the most fun I've ever had. I was glad to do the work and lose all that sleep for the right to be where I am, and *gulp* I'd probably do it all again if I had to.

Drake_Dercon:

Jumplion:

Drake_Dercon:
snipped because of embarrassing statement.

Boy, you've just listed all of my concerns in a good 3 statements >_< God, the future never slows the fuck down, does it?

Yeah, that didn't come out right.

My whole idea is that where I live (that would be Canada in general), there aren't really any good schools geared towards video game design. Then, reading this article, I found a "dream school". Your concerns are quite important, I admit, but I personally have turned out most of my best work while working through fatigue (and not stopping long enough to lose where I left off). The whole idea of working through the crunch, for me, is a fantastic one because my own thought process functions better when I don't give it time to stop or become distracted.

I also recognize that it's not for everyone and different people work better under different circumstances. I was merely stating that for my personal path, this seems a great option.

I don't I really get the misinterpretation, but regardless I wish you luck with your ventures. Right now I'm keeping my options open for the future as I'm going into film making/video games, so this school does pique my interests as well.

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