Dead Space 2 Is No Resident Evil 4

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"And frankly, I'm still unclear on what the whole point of the eye thing was, plot-wise, besides someone thought it would be cool to gratuitously throw in."

The point is...

SPOILER

...to convince you that Ellie is dead, just before revealing that she is quite alive, despite having lost depth perception.

Kopikatsu:
A page dedicated to a badass helmet? Blasphemy, I say!

In Dead Space: Extraction, they actually did pull of their helmets and set them down (RIGHT IN THE MIDDLE OF THE WALKWAY. Inconsiderate jerks.) and it took painfully long. I prefer the automatic fold-down helmets, if only for the aesthetics.

Anyway, I agree with the above posters, Yahtzee. If you played Vanquish, it must be reviewed! (I thought the game could have been better if 99.9% of the enemies weren't RUSSIAN and robots. So...I don't even know how to describe it. 'Hey, we beat the Russians!' 'Yeah, about that...' 'I bet we killed all them dirty, dirty commies!' 'Well...no. They were all robots. They lost enough metal to build a city and a few billion dollars.' 'Well, we lost less, right?' 'Weeeeeell...we lost most of our fleet, and pretty much 95% of the army. But hey, we still have Sam Gideon! Oh. Wait. This report says he died of lung cancer. Well FFFFFFFFFF-'

...I lost my train of thought.

Well, you've just described the reason I loved Vanquish. I'm Russian and naturally felt slightly offended when first heard about this game. However, once I've played through it and realized that it's a story about 1 (one) Russian dude who destroyed San Francisco and most of USA army with zero casualties on Russian side.

kouriichi:
OT: I think that Dead Space is a "Nu Horror". You know how they have the "Nu Metal" music? Ment for a newer generation of metal heads? Its the same thing with "Nu Horror" games.
...
In short, its a new kind of horror game, for a new generation. Us "Veteran" video gamers have been through all the horror games. Weve seen theyer progression. And because of it, the newer ones just arnt as good. Because nothing is scarier then our memories of whats scary.

Honestly, I think that that's the best justification for differing people's reactions. Some people forget that not everyone's played the whole horror genre before = it certainly never interested me. I never played a Resident Evil or a Silent Hill; not my type. Dead Space 1 was my first experience, and I loved it - it freaked the shit out of me on my first play-through, though I was used to it by play through 2.

None the less I lapped up Dead Space 2's atmosphere and loved it. I was so un-nerved though-out the first half of the game, it was awesome. Take 2, new-game plus, with a super-charged plasma cutter and advanced knowledge of the set-pieces took the edge out of it and made it just a fun fps. I can see how lovers of the horror genre would have not found the horror aspects of the game up to scratch right from the word go, but with enough exposure everything becomes staid and boring and competing with nostalgia is a bitch, but to dismiss the game on niggles is to do it an injustice.

DeliciousCake:
Actually, the intro to Dead Space 2 is the fastest a transformation has ever occurred in the games. Usually, the person has to be dead for a fair amount of time before the flying vagina has its way with the it and even then it takes anywhere from ~5-10 seconds of sinew snapping and bone exploding before the shambling monstrosity is battle ready. Hell, I think that's literally the only occurrence where life->death->necromorph was so fast. I really believe Yahtzee is grasping for straws with that scene...granted, the fast-pass transformation is one of the first things you see in the game, but still.

Oh, and don't tell me the Stalker necromorphs didn't freak you out with their bloody bone dog faces quizzically peering out behind corners before they blind sided you and took 1/2 of your health.

I couldn't agree more. In fact I think Dead Space 2 does a great job of building tension. You go through the Ishimura for ages, ready to be attacked at any moment but nothing happens and the tension just builds until you finally let your guard your guard down and...wham! You get ass raped by a brute and 20 necros. Hell, there's even a bit early on where a bedroom alarm clock went off and I shat myself.

Lost In Space

People just tend to mix up "gore" or "ugly monsters" with "horror".

If you feel horrified, that's an emotion. Gore or ugly monsters that are supposed to install fear are just tools. Tools on their own can't achieve anything. They have to be used correctly.
In the attempt to create an analogy, exchange "horror" with "love" and let's say that the tool this time is a pretty face. You don't love a character just because they have a pretty face. It's a component that may play an important part for many people, but just showing a pretty face doesn't make us love this or that character.

Personally I didn't have a problem with them making the game have a little bit of each element of horror in it, some people say it's inconsistency but I say it's interesting. I felt the game had a good balance between being psychological horror, action horror and occasionally it did sometimes even feel like a horror survival particularly near the end a little before and after the regenerator monster shows up. I also liked the game's humour regardless of the small part it played in the game.

Having said that there are some things about Dead Space 2 that could have been better. Some of these are small gripes and doesn't have a major effect on my enjoyment of this game but I feel a need to express these gripes as I feel no one has mentioned them yet. For instance I didn't like how quickly dead Necromorph bodies disappear after I had killed them, there had been one case where a dead Necromorph body which I had killed disappeared in front of me when I was just about to stamp on it to get an item. This could be due to the fact that I don't have a digital TV but if that isn't the case, then it is one of those few small things that annoys me a little.

I also felt that the zero gravity and inside vent sections could have been better. When I went inside the vent one of the first things I thought was that scene from the movie Alien in which the captain is inside the vent doing something and the Alien is loose in there as well. I was really hoping to fight Necromorphs in the vent and if they provided Dead Space 2 with a tool that allows you to detect movement in the vents that would have been more complete than just going in the vent and out the other end.

The one thing I really liked in the first game was the ability to walk on walls and the ceiling in the zero gravity sections, it was fun and I was hoping that would be in the second game as well as the ability to fly around using your rocket boots. Instead they replaced ceiling/wall walking with the ability to fly anywhere you want, why can't we have both? Speaking of zero gravity, how come there wasn't more combat in those scenes? My guess is they tried to do the atmosphere trick in horror by making you paranoid by lack of enemies that works well in games like Amnesia The Dark Descent but for a game that is mainly focused on action horror, I was hoping for some more action or better yet they could done both in separate zero gravity scenarios.

I didn't like the fact you had to remove a equipped weapon to buy a new one which would have been better if it just got automatically stored in the safe, I found it annoying that you had to pay to remove all the nodes from a weapon or equipment (which I did once for the Rivet Gun which is completely useless to me)and if there are other gripes, I've probably forgotten (at this stage I'm probably nitpicking but other than that good game). One last gripe I have is the cover art. The first Dead Space, just by looking at it you can tell that it is a horror game that takes place in space that probably has a lot of gore because of the dismembered hand. Whereas the collectors edition and normal edition cover art it just gives off the impression that it's just a sci-fi game with no horror.

P.S. As for the Iron Man automatic assemble helmet, I personally wouldn't change it. It's believable because as technology advances humans get lazier and I personally think it is a lot more convenient to have a helmet that is automatically put together across your face rather than taking your helmet off when on break and then putting it back on when break is over. It just means that as long as you have that engineering suit, you can go back to work any time you want with ease.

Chairman Miaow:

Labcoat Samurai:

Second, regarding the helmet thing, it's true that it would offer less protection, but modern engineers wear plastic hardhats on site. How much protection do you really need? And you're not going to misplace it, so that's nice. The fact that it's used in combat is sort of an unhappy turn of events that they probably weren't planning for when they designed the thing.

Isaac's helmet however is intended for space, where overall integrity is more important than the modern building site.

Yeah, so if it provides an airtight seal, it's good enough. Hard to say whether it does or not. For some reason, you have a very limited air supply in the game. Either it leaks a lot, which seems bad, or it just doesn't retain much air. It *seems* like the latter, since the capacity is upgradable.

Got to disagree with you on this one yatzhee, they did majorly improve deadspace in this one. There was alot of psychological horror, that was put inbetween all the gore, that I really enjoyed. Yes, the necromorphs were actually the least frightening part again, but atleast we got to see Isaac with a personality, and grow more demented as the story progresses and the moments of mental breakdown grow more and more intense. It would have been great if they could have somehow combined these moments with the necromorps, because they turned into safe havens due to necromorphs refusing to interrupt Nicole and Isaac's "private time." Plus there are quite a few subtle things, they just get drowned in the bloodflow from the contant mindless assult you have to fend off.

But as for deadspace being serious, I would say: Yes, but it does have a degree of self awareness. Just look at the ending of DS2: A direct parody of deadspace1's ending.

Also, the helmet being so easily removable is part of the plot, so as ridiculous as it is, its atleast somewhat justified. Plus, people in the future will be lazy as all hell, which explains why the only person you control seems to survive more than 5 minutes in any deadspace game.

Shamanic Rhythm:

Labcoat Samurai:
First, the fact that people argue over the intention or meaning of something doesn't mean that it did a poor job of getting its meaning across. There are whole college courses taught in literary analysis, and not a single one of them consists of a whole group of people trivially going through every work agreeing on what it was trying to say or do.

I hope you were being sarcastic, because I've been in literature college courses where they literally do just that, no pun intended.

Sounds like a boring class. "Not a single one" is hyperbole, but a major goal of those classes should be to encourage discussion and promote individuals to think for themselves. In many cases there is a "right" answer that most people agree upon, but if we start there, and there's no discussion of alternative viewpoints, you have a class full of boring people with no ideas of their own, or you're analyzing works that probably don't require analysis.

In fact, I think more gamers should be made to sit English in college, because a lot of them could do with being introduced to the intentional fallacy. Every time someone levels a shred of criticism at any game, someone pops out of the nearest manhole and declares that 'it's not trying to be this!' The value of individual response is strangely out of favour compared to lofty ideals of some meta-criticism that overrides everything else.

I think you might be misapplying intentional fallacy here, though. If someone says "This is crap because it's absurd" it does matter whether they're reviewing Airplane or The Matrix. If Dead Space *were* a self-aware parody of the sci-fi horror genre, it would be pointless to criticize it for being over the top and absurd. It's only meta-criticism if you arrive at that conclusion through developer interviews or something similar. If you arrive at the "intent" conclusion through analysis *of the work*, it's fair game, and not a meta-criticism. I don't think any of the people you're referring to were getting their data from meta-sources.

Particularly because I think the intent *was* to be serious and genuine, so I doubt any such sources exist.

So true i was more scared of RES4 than Dead space.Yes later in RES 4 it become less scary the monsters become more and more ridicules and yo get a magnum revolver.But in dead space the necromorphes after a the first 1/4 of game i don't even care and yo don't even care for your characters life its just like oh i died *reload* and for a game like dead space that's a huge flaw.

awesomeClaw:
\But i must say, i think the fold-up thingy is quite cool. I mean, sure, it isnīt espcially REALISTIC or BELIEVABLE, but it looks damn cool and like you said yourself, we donīt need realism in every game, right?

Fine line between realism & plausibility. A game can evade mundanity without betraying common sense.

I think you think to much. Yes it's impractical and unrealistic but its cool.

gigastar:

hermes200:

gigastar:
And yes i do agree with one thing Yahtzee said (or wrote), the game is just inconsistent in its messages. Gameplay is a sci-fi/gore fans dream and the story just feels like it was just stapled in then revelant cutscenes added afterwards.

That is a pretty serious problem in most games, even the good ones.

Some of the examples I can think of include Niko Bellic (troublesome, angsty past vs running over hookers and shooting cars with a bazooka), Chuck Greene (concerned parent of his motherless daughter vs riding on a tricycle over zombies wearing a bra) or even Bioshock's Jack (all the deep, intellectual conflicts can be solved with a hand that shoots bees and a wrench to the face)

I believe the main problem is that designers have a hard time marring a relatable character (which most confuse with troubled and angsty) with a badass force of nature most designers want to evoke. One of the best characters in that sense was Kratos in God of War 1, until the new directors make him extra angsty and extra badass at the same time for no good reason.

It's possible that a solution is to either tone down the characters action, at the risk of making a game that is quite boring.

Or another way is to make the story optional or just ignore the it entirely. Monster Hunter games largely ignore the story before Tri, and that led to fighting stuff like...

Of course, there is also a third, best alternative. And it is making the gameplay suit the character and the character suit the gameplay.

Look at Batman: Arkham Assylum. I believe one of the reasons why people liked that game so much was because it makes you feel like Batman, not only because you can hit guys in the face, but because you can also lurk in the shadows and hunt them down one by one. Others have tried making Batman a beat'em up or a Contra-like game and it doesn't work... You can replace Batman with any other character in those games and it would feel the same. A FPS starring Batman wouldn't work, no matter how much (or little) you tone the action or how much (or little) attention you pay to the storyline.

On the other hand, look at the last Alone in the Dark or Dead Space. Those are survival horror games in name only (even when the "survival horror" genre is more like a marketing invention). Horror games try to get to you with a sense of dread, loneliness and underpower... there is nothing helpless in an ex-marine with a flamethrower or a heavily armored guy with futuristic weapons. That is why most sucessfully dreadful games tend to be starred by unarmed kids. Its like yatzhee's review on Darksiders: "you don't get to be angsty when you are carrying a 2 meters sword and can cut a demon in half with a single swing... You are a monster truck that walks like a man"

Games is one of the few mediums that can tell a lot without relaying on text or dialog alone. If your character doesn't comunicate something to me, or what he does and says is not what he plays like, then the character designer and the writer are not doing their jobs. Maybe one of them thought they were doing an RPG and the other one thought they were doing a fighting game, or maybe they could replace the stoic heavylifting old guy with a slim lolita girl and the game would be the same... Either way, someone there is making a poor job of selling the setting to me.

WanderingFool:

I hate the idea of all these little parts fitting together, just seems that making a power armor thats two or three (counting the helmet as seperate piece) is more practicle than a suit of armor that reqiures hundreds of small components being assembled by half a dozen robotic arms, and basically cant be removed or equiped in the field. I let it slide for the Space MArines from SC, simply because they only do it once (before meeting a untimely, but predictable, death).

I think it is adjusting so much because its calibrating, also this is a movie the fact that it is doing all that stuff makes it seem that there is more life in the suit. Kinda giving the suit its own techy personallity. for instance if the suit just went on and off it wouldn't make much of an impact, but if the suit did this insanely complicated assembly then you think "whoa,that is pretty weird I wonder how it does that." Hell in the second movie he is basically upgrading his suit while other people are trying to take his suit, its all about the suit.

Honestly, I recognize that Dead Space 2 wasn't scary. But me? I DON'T CARE. I think it's a great game, and while I agree that there's no way it's a horror game, I still found it to be more emotive than the first installment. I think they did a great job on it.

Also, seriously, RE4 is scary? Did I play a different game?

Amazingly, one game DOES do the helmet thing properly - Shin Megami Tensei: Strange Journey. The Demonica suits, while their helmets look kind of weird, have to be taken off like any other helmet, and it looks large and thick enough to provide practical protection.

We have already seen the necromorphs we know what they are what they do and how to kill them, if your are a ds fan then you have seen the movies the comics and etc.

There was no mystery left by the time ds2 hit, even if you never played the first game, you probably had heard about it.

DS1 had the advantage of having a heavy dose of unknown going for it. All the monsters each type was new, you never knew what you were going to see.

It is like alien vs aliens, you know what the monster looks like, so there is no shock value in the full reveal. DS2 took the same ques from alien and aliens, and just went the action/gore heavy route.

Most gamers are pretty darn jaded anyway, few of us were scared by doom or doom 3 no matter how many demonic hellspawn burst out of the wall wanting to eat your face, after a bit it was just point and fire until it stops moving.

Tension is a good point going back to the old ship was the most creeppy part of the game just waiting for all hell to break loose, and when it kept no breaking loose the tension just ramped up much more effecting than the more or less constant slaughter fest you go thru past 10 minutes into the game.

I noted the helmet thing my logic part of my brain pretty much pointed out immediately that the helmet was unworkable and nonsensical, especially the security suits with how bulky they were, but dammit they looked cool and the whole fold out thing looked cool, so i personally said f it and let it slide.

DS@ was action focused that is the bottom line, fact the first game was seen as some touchstone of horror does not mean that the second game had to follow that path.

Labcoat Samurai:

Sounds like a boring class. "Not a single one" is hyperbole, but a major goal of those classes should be to encourage discussion and promote individuals to think for themselves. In many cases there is a "right" answer that most people agree upon, but if we start there, and there's no discussion of alternative viewpoints, you have a class full of boring people with no ideas of their own, or you're analyzing works that probably don't require analysis.

I'm in complete agreement with you, actually. I can't stand lecturers, or even other classmates, who try to force their interpretation of a work through the idea that what the author 'intended' is the only way you can read or judge a text.

I think you might be misapplying intentional fallacy here, though. If someone says "This is crap because it's absurd" it does matter whether they're reviewing Airplane or The Matrix. If Dead Space *were* a self-aware parody of the sci-fi horror genre, it would be pointless to criticize it for being over the top and absurd. It's only meta-criticism if you arrive at that conclusion through developer interviews or something similar. If you arrive at the "intent" conclusion through analysis *of the work*, it's fair game, and not a meta-criticism. I don't think any of the people you're referring to were getting their data from meta-sources.

Particularly because I think the intent *was* to be serious and genuine, so I doubt any such sources exist.

When I apply the intentional fallacy I mean in the way people leap to the defence of a game by dismissing any criticism that can be generated through comparison to another game. People who say 'It's not trying to be Resident Evil 4' are missing the point: in the minds of enough audience members, the game is similar enough in tone to Resident Evil 4 to warrant comparison. Whatever ambition the developers may have had in mind is not enough to warrant ignoring anyone's opinion about how they reacted to the game.

Ok, i played through Dead Space 2 two times; not because i really liked it, but because i was trying to find something in the game that i could reflect upon and say "this made the whole experience worth while". No such epiphany occurred to me in either run through. While i can't say the original Dead Space was by any means the best horror game ever invented i still really enjoyed it and actually found the plot, though cut and pace, moderately disturbing. Dead Space 2, as far as i can tell, is a ripoff of its predecessor that got so bent on trying to appease to the juvenile crowd that it comes out looking like something a ten year old could have made.

Now, before Dead Space 2 fans get out their limited addition plasma cutters and start trying to hunt me down, let me say that i still found Dead Space 2 fun. Any game where you can run around with increasingly pimped out weaponry can easily get that point in its favor. Fun, however, is the only thing that Dead Space 2 offers, and that makes it a fail in my book. A game is supposed to be like a good book or movie where you leave the experience with something at the end; whether its a different outlook on a certain concept or with something as simple as the thought "that was really interesting". All i left Dead Space 2 with was a increased tolerance for blood and a new standard of lower tier gaming. Huzzah EA; you have now set the standard for my "crap list" bar.

As for the helmet thing, well, i personally thought it was cool looking; but Isaac did it so many times that it just got irritating.

Getting off the whole folding helmet thing.

Honestly I think you have something going with the generic monster screaming thing, Honestly the level that unnerved me most ever was Ravenholme in Half Life 2. You knew that the person inside the headcrab is in all likelihood dead. But the screams and moans that emit from the creatures, especially as you light them on fire...

It added a lot. It gave you the dark thoughts that maybe the headcrab was controlling the body but the mind and soul were still trapped still feeling every tiny ounce of agony that you or the crab inflicted.

That, I think should have been the direction they could have taken with the necromorphs adn made them more effective as an engine of terror. Have them call out to you in alien gibberish. Have them moan with all too human cries and grunts when isaac gives his Reb Brown man roar. Give the impression that whatever is getting to them(virus? fungus?) didn't quite remove every ounce of humanity from them.

As far as what kind of horror. Science-fiction horror, which is gory with a side of psychological. See Event Horizon, The Thing or the original Alien.

FinalFreak16:
I loved Dead Space 1, and I mean I really loved it. To the point that I played it through three times on different difficulties and collected every Trophy. It was scary and had just enough gore and in my opinion a good story.

Dead Space 2 on the other hand... I have yet to buy. The reviews, the comments and trailers have put me off. Games with gore are good, but games just deliberatly trying to be gory and 'Gruesome' just dont appeal to me. For instance I have never seen the appeal of the Saw films beyond the story behind them. I dont want to watch a man pull his eye out or cut his arm off or whatever.

I'll probably get the game eventually, when its cheaper probably so i can see for myself. But im already dissapointed that the series has taken this direction.

What you talking about...? You're putting comments from people on the internet above your own admiration for a video game series? Dead Space 2 is pretty good, it's not amazing and not as worrying as the first--as you already know what the enemy is now. But it's still an amazingly well done game for the most part. As for your "gore" concern, there's no more gore than what was in Dead Space 1. And you dislike Gore yet loved Dead Space 1, then I am at a loss, as Dead Space 1 was rather filled with such things. I remember because I have as well collected every achievement, suit, item, and text-log from the first.

As for the eye situation, there's only one part in the game that is even close to saw-level (even then it's rather tame, unless you screw up the sequence), and that's it. Is a few seconds of being uncomfortable more important than a possible 9 to 14 (depending on difficulty you choose) hour long game?

Just rent the game for a few bucks if you're curious, or at least buy it used, but if you loved the original then there's no way you should put off the second. Hell, the Train and Zero-Jump sections were worth the price of the game alone personally. Not to mention the rather sweet second boss battle. (Though I'll admit the first one is rather boring.)

So go try it out, Unitologist! Make Altman proud!

I suppose my ultimate problems with the review assumes that the reader enjoyed RE4 and HL2 more and I didn't. I certainly found DS2 more fun than the prissy RE4 PC and no do talk to me about it a prissy pc port and it's not capcoms fault. No, it is god damn capcoms fault and so yeah, no love from me there. half-life2 frankly I find it a over hyped cookie cutter silent stoic emotionless robot in the silent unconnected protagonist like HALO with a shitty physics toy stapled to its ass and the same kind of vague uninteresting story. So, yeah I guess I'm functionally lobotomized fine and I suppose this ultimate counters no point and decays into "I think your rating it harshly because your rating shit/mediocre high." but I suppose everyone is allowed a rant time to time after all you make a living off it.

Oh jeez. Now I find myself in the very difficult position of adding my viewpoint to 120+ posts talking about more or less the same, while attempting to add new information to something that's been commented over and over again. Anyway, here I go.

Foldable helmets: yeah, they're unpractical from a design point of view, BUT yeah, they're cool as hell. I personally think in the case of Dead Space 2 they stick especially out since, in my opinion, the suit's design makes the face section of the helmet something closer to a welding mask, in that it's a rigid, one-piece part of protective clothing. I think in DS's universe it would make a LOT more sense if the front section of the helmet just slid over the character's head. It could still be automated, it could still look cool, but you know, just add a hinge around the person's ear and let it move from front to top. Simple, elegant, and credible for the even bitchier fan. When on top it would still offer protection to ANYWHERE except the face (that is, top and back of the head) if that's the user's will. Want to have all your head exposed? Then take it off. I think that'd be the best option, while still looking cool and sci-fi and being convenient and shit. But the multiple-piece animation looks way cooler and it's still the future, so yeah: it's something we'll have to accept, same as explosions/thrusters noises in space.

Now, I'd like to stand out for something I hold very dear while on the subject: Mass Effect. I don't quite remember if that happens in Mass Effect 2, but at least on 1 the helmet comes off from virtually nowhere, which would stick out as another fairly unrealistic plot device, BUT: This game revolves around mass effect fields, which is the techno-magic used to explain a lot of the unrealistic tropes in that universe. Mass Effect makes everything lighter or heavier, which would explain that disappearing helmet: it just folds and goes unnoticed (still, it doesn't explain a 150+ item space), but hey: helmets don't need to be protective because there is an energy barrier that wards off kinetic hazards, so the helmet could be perfectly made of ultra-light alloys only designed to be hermetic, so there's that. I know Yahtzee didn't even mention that, but damn I'll show my ME fanboyism if I have the opportunity to do so.

And about the lack of human-like emotions to enemies: I think that's just lazy. In my opinion if you make everything look painful, bizarre, gorey and most importantly, if you make it happen SLOWLY, that'll be hella lot more unnerving and scary. But the game seems almost absurdly focused on showing Isaac's inner turmoil, and almost all of the horror is concentrated on making us fear for the character's safety. Which is cool, I guess, but doesn't even bother on showing us much of what happens when you turn into a monster. So the game is more "don't let me die to these non-descript things" instead of "I'M FACING ONE OF THE GALAXY'S MOST TERRIBLE HORRORS -also don't let me die while doing it". But again, that would require the game to radically change its focus and turn it into something more similar to a coral documentary about the necromorphs instead of a single person's adventure against the monsters. So it's the plot's natural trajectory and is more than expected, I guess.

So there. It isn't really a surprise to me, since I kinda felt the same way after the first Dead Space, but I thought it was something that could be improved towards a second installment: we already learned to fear the creatures, now we could feast in the bigger-than-the-universe horror and how it predates on humans OR in Isaac's personal demons. It still feels like it chose the wrong path to me.

A Curious Fellow:
I can't wait to see how many people missed the sarcasm in the last paragraph *makes popcorn*

Easier to suspend disbelief when the problem is hidden implication of the interface, or a menu. I can understand why Yahtzee singed out the helmets but not the even bigger weapon bulk storage and weight problems.

Anyhow, those probs don't tend to come in moveies so much anyway.

While Iron-Man's suit is entirely made up of hinges and joints and flappy bits, which in reality would make the suit fall apart or malfunction really easily, it still looks, visually, impressive. Although that scene where he gets hit by a tank missile and survives is ridiculous. As for RE4, I think the closest comparison I can make with Dead Space is the similarities between the monsters and the Regenerators. Both are aesthetically similar, but Regenerators move at a much slower pace and all they do is breathe heavily. Yet they're the most terrifying enemies in the game. Subtlety and suspense really works well in any horror game, and you'd be lying if you said you didn't panic whenever you heard that breathing noise.

It's called a nanosuit.

Motakikurushi:
While Iron-Man's suit is entirely made up of hinges and joints and flappy bits, which in reality would make the suit fall apart or malfunction really easily, it still looks, visually, impressive...

Tony Stark's ridiculous technology is more believable because he is an octillionaire & mega-genius. Not sure grunt engineers should have comparable funding.

Still, style over substance is the mantra these days. Not much to be done. It does look nice, if you can suspend disbelief.

TarkXT:

Honestly I think you have something going with the generic monster screaming thing, Honestly the level that unnerved me most ever was Ravenholme in Half Life 2. You knew that the person inside the headcrab is in all likelihood dead. But the screams and moans that emit from the creatures, especially as you light them on fire...

It added a lot. It gave you the dark thoughts that maybe the headcrab was controlling the body but the mind and soul were still trapped still feeling every tiny ounce of agony that you or the crab inflicted.

The Ravenholme zombies actually scream "ЕЕЕЕБАААААТЬ! БОЛЬНО!", which means "FFUUUUUCK! IT HURTS!" in Russian.

Normandyfoxtrot:
I suppose my ultimate problems with the review assumes that the reader enjoyed RE4 and HL2 more and I didn't. I certainly found DS2 more fun than the prissy RE4 PC and no do talk to me about it a prissy pc port and it's not capcoms fault. No, it is god damn capcoms fault and so yeah, no love from me there.

They released a patch (official one, not the custom so-called "HD patch", that stuff is crap), that fixes the lost graphic effects (like fog) and lighting, so if you still have it, might want to give it another go.

I'm probably reiterating someone else's point because I don't feel like reading through all the comments.

On the subject of horror: real horror is likely just unpalatable to most people in the mainstream audience(which is the target of most games cause that's where all the money is to be had). Considering that is the target of most games, movies, and some books these days, it's not surprising one doesn't get the true horror experience from these works.

Real horror is about hopelessness and one's powerlessness to alter or even mitigate one's plight. You will descend into madness and then be destroyed. You will do this bit-by-bit and be fully aware of the process the entire time, and there will be absolutely nothing you can do to stop it. To truly screw with you, a carrot of false hope might be dangled in front of you just to spur you on to the possibility of being able to find a way out. But then, just as you see the light at the end on the long dark tunnel, it's all ripped away from you at the very last moment, revealing the true inevitability of your descent into madness and then annihilation.

Let's be honest, to most people, that just would not be fun or enjoyable. Sure, there is definitely a contingent of people that would find it to be enjoyable(H. P. Lovecraft has his fans, after all), but most mainstream audiences would not. So, in order to sell the game in massive numbers, the horror has to be toned down or altered to something more whimsical. Hell, just the fact there's actually a win condition(I'm speaking in general terms here, because I haven't actually played the series) means the true horror is lost.

Regarding the folding helmets: dude, I'm a graduate physics major. Every time I go to the movies these days, I have to take off the suspenders of disbelief else they will snap and smack me in the face, really freaking hard. So, I feel your pain, but sometimes it's better to just enjoy the ride and not try to analyze things to within a gnat's ass of precision and accuracy for realism. It's just a cool-looking concept, and that's why it gets used(of course, one can argue that cool-looking is really not a sufficient aesthetic, but that's another rant). It doesn't have to actually be feasible. It's probably something borrowed from anime as you would see something primitively similar there(the space or flight helmet that would suddenly whoosh away behind the head and neck at the push of a button).

just searched around youtube for this (not my video) http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xbUD5t8cVuo&feature=related starts 5 seconds into the video fold up helmets are nothing new ... although this is probably even less realistic ahem.

Frankly, I'm surprised a thread (partially) about good horror in games hasn't mentioned Thief: Deadly Shadows and the "Shalebridge Cradle" Level. The rest has to be spoilers, because some people might not have played it, and I don't want to ruin it for them.

Ben, I honestly don't have a clue as to how on earth you think Resident Evil is trying to be funny in any way. I would have thought you to be a bit more intelligent as to not forget Resident Evil belongs to Capcom, and Capcom live on another planet where Sayans are butlers and Wonder Woman is as much of a wonder as Jesus is. You have to kill giant scorpion men with exploding barrels and action movie somersaults in every game Capcom ever made. At times I wonder if the original creators of monster hentai aren't perhaps the founders of Capcom. It's not over the top humour, Resident Evil takes itself even more serious than Dead Space does because Capcom takes itself more serious than EA does. Either you've forgotten all about Devil May Cry and Lost Planet or you actually think those freaks at Capcom have a sense of humour. Hell, even Silent Hill (apart from The Room) had stupid boss fights and Capcom still live in their little fantasy worlds where games simply need to have loads of boss fights and superhuman characters.

Ben, you have no idea what constitutes horror. It's true that the most unbearable notion for most normal people is suffering and making others suffer, and yes it evokes sympathy...it doesn't frighten us though. Yes, we are afraid we might die a horrible death, most are afraid of death to begin with, afraid of the possiblity there is no after-life, afraid of suffering... However, we are much more afraid of the unthinkable, of the unknown. Amnesia The Dark Descent showed us more than anything else how we forget about what suffering another human can bring upon us and become utterly insane with fear of what unthinkable things walk down the hallway and what on earth they could do to us. I've seen people die in horrible ways, both via the internet and in real life. I've seen things which made me stay awake for months at a time... Yet people grow accustomed to anything... I've played through Amnesia 3 times and I'm playing it for the fourth time...and still, even now I've never experienced such fear as when I play Amnesia... Sure, you might say those mutants were once humans...but it's not the things I've done to them which scare me...it's the things they might do to me.

There's absolutely nothing about Resident Evil which is touching. The characters, the Ganados, I couldn't care less about all those bland and boring protagonists and antagonists...Daniel on the other hand is an entirely different story.

I just recently started playing the original Dead Space, and literally four days ago i tweeted the following. "plays like RE4 in space but the tension of having to stop to fire your gun is gone" Without the tension of having to stop to fire fighting the big impressive necromorphs becomes nothing more than a kite fest. the game has yet to challenge me and the more i play it the more i think having to stop to shoot in RE4 was less lazyness and more a design master stroke.

When he mentioned the possibility of the necromorphs having retained a human voice, my stomach churned and I was instantly reminded of the Zombies from half life.
The ones which instead of shouts of agression yell lines of human speech "Oh god help me!" and the like.
I went on a hunting trip once and found it easier to pull the trigger than I did when I first saw the zombies.

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