295: Gifted Youngster

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We love you Susan :D

"Susan Arendt hopes that someone eventually gets Gambit right in an X-Men movie."

Me too, Susan - me too.

I am frankly on the rebound from this attitude as I grow older. Nerddom is tainted now by the faint scent of cool. There's always been a certain petty self-righteousness in us nerds. We've always been judgemental and harsh and unreasonably opinionated and hard to be around. Back in the day, when this was coupled with actual abuse and bullying and a certain amount of real, genuine social ostracism I did feel that those wish fulfilment stories about superheroes and outcastst-who-turn-out-to-be-special-after-all served a purpose.

These days... eh, not so much. Sure, I still enjoy a superhero comic book from time to time, and I am spiritually queuing up for The Avengers already, but I've also come to realize that a lot of the time people don't stay away because you're "different", but because you are... well, unpleasant. The argument of difference just comes apart in a world of iPods and Internet and Call of Duty. Nerds are clearly no more different than anybody else, and we are all piled together in these social sites and forums and everything else. I refuse to let myself and, by extension, others misunderstand a social awkwardness that stems from, quite frankly, being an asshole, as society misunderstanding how special we are inside.

I think that's kinda healthy.

This is a great article. But it's not actually news. A little tidbit for everyone. The feelings of being different, being apart of a world that fears and hates you for who and what you are, these feelings were the exact reason this comic was created. The manifestation of the characters Mutant abilities is a proxy for the feelings and changes a persons body goes through with Puberty.

This book from day one was meant to resonate with people going through that. With people experiencing the same feelings of being different, being a freak, and not being in total control of what is happening with your body.

It's never ever a bad thing to be reminded of this though. And it's further proof about the validity of comics as a form of literature meant to speak to people on a deeper level. It shows the possibilities of what someone can become with what is happening to them. Both the heroes and villains of the stories are a stand in for what each individual person can and will eventually evolve into.

Noelveiga:
I am frankly on the rebound from this attitude as I grow older. Nerddom is tainted now by the faint scent of cool. There's always been a certain petty self-righteousness in us nerds. We've always been judgemental and harsh and unreasonably opinionated and hard to be around. Back in the day, when this was coupled with actual abuse and bullying and a certain amount of real, genuine social ostracism I did feel that those wish fulfilment stories about superheroes and outcastst-who-turn-out-to-be-special-after-all served a purpose.

These days... eh, not so much. Sure, I still enjoy a superhero comic book from time to time, and I am spiritually queuing up for The Avengers already, but I've also come to realize that a lot of the time people don't stay away because you're "different", but because you are... well, unpleasant. The argument of difference just comes apart in a world of iPods and Internet and Call of Duty. Nerds are clearly no more different than anybody else, and we are all piled together in these social sites and forums and everything else. I refuse to let myself and, by extension, others misunderstand a social awkwardness that stems from, quite frankly, being an asshole, as society misunderstanding how special we are inside.

I think that's kinda healthy.

Thank you! Too often I've seen that, and too rarely is it acknowledged. No, you're not disliked because you're a bit odd. You're disliked because you're selfish and have no actual interest in other people.

The show Big Bang Theory can be seen as based around this dilemma. A comedy about a house of nerds and yet it shows that the reason they're ostracized isn't so much because they're different/smarter than those around them, but because they're basically unpleasant people who's primary focus is on themselves.

Hell, I had all the classic components of nerd-dom myself. Interested in sci-fi, geek stuff, no interest in professional sports, lousy fashion-sense (both in me and my mother who purchased the clothing I wore) etc. all through high school. Yet I never lacked for friends, never was treated as an outsider, even though they recognized I was extremely smart and "different" from them in my interests. Why? Because I was also actually interested in them and their lives, and had no interest in proving that I was superior. So all you would be nerds going, "They just don't understand me!" have you tried perhaps understanding them?

An Amazing Article! I became a fan of the X-Men many years ago for Similar reasons as you and I can honestly say that I can relate to this Article completely!

This was a great article.

I use to be extremely shy in high school myself. Geeky, awkward, bullied to no end. The cliche. But then I went to college and... my dorm happened to be located in a Pittsburgh ghetto called Homewood.

So, I found myself in a situation where I HAD to break out of my shell. I learned to just... stop caring... about everything.

Now, I LIKE broadcasting my weirdness. I make my own ultra geeky hats and t-shirts and smile when people uncomfortably turn their gaze away.

Every time I make someone uncomfortable or break the monotony of their boring little lives I get some small crumb of revenge against the norm for the hell my weirdness put me through back in the days when I cared about what people thought of me.

Bitter? Angry? Cynical? Hell yes. To be anything else seems ludicrous to me at this point.

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