Editor's Note: Box Office Games

Box Office Games

You got movies in my videogames! No, you got videogames in my movies! This week, we examine the intriguing ways these two mediums are intersecting.

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Good article, I've always kind of looked down on cinematic games as a misuse of interactive media, but I do take your point that there is a lot to be gained in crossovers, as long as they're done well. For my money, Half Life 2 is still one of the best cinematic games I've played, precisely because it finds the sweet spot between interaction and passive participation.
On a side note, no Russ this week?

Spark Ignition:
On a side note, no Russ this week?

And no Russ means no 'fingergun' :'(

After all, as much as I love movies and games, the last thing I want is for the two to become indistinguishable.

Pink Floyd's "The Wall" is heralded by some people as one of the best musical films ever made, but that doesn't mean that you can't make a good film that has no sound whatsoever.

No matter how much crossover may occur, some stories are best told through a single medium. Some are best told through text, some are best told visually, and -- as we're just starting to find out -- some stories are best told interactively.

UNHchabo:

After all, as much as I love movies and games, the last thing I want is for the two to become indistinguishable.

Pink Floyd's "The Wall" is heralded by some people as one of the best musical films ever made, but that doesn't mean that you can't make a good film that has no sound whatsoever.

No matter how much crossover may occur, some stories are best told through a single medium. Some are best told through text, some are best told visually, and -- as we're just starting to find out -- some stories are best told interactively.

Yeah, I totally agree. There are profound differences in what games and books and movies are meant to do, which is why I try not to get upset when my favorite parts of books are left out of films, or my favorite parts of films are left out of games.

Steve Butts:
As technology evolves and becomes more accessible, videogames will be able to deliver living room experiences that rival what Hollywood is offering.

Considering how creatively bankrupt Hollywood has been in recent years, what they are offering nowadays is very poor. So this statement is actually more of an insult than a compliment.

And yet, unfortunately, that is the correct image of the modern game industry. Just like Hollywood, the modern gaming industry is also creatively bankrupt.

 

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