Editor's Note: The Broke Gamer

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The Broke Gamer

You might be broke as a joke, but that doesn't mean you have to stop gaming.

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I definitely feel it right now. I have $74 to my name, haven't started my new job yet, and owe just about $373 in taxes still. Luckily, my parents are backing me up with the taxes and everything, but it does leave me very short for games. I've resorted to going to my friends' houses and rifling through their game libraries for something I might borrow for a while. Just got Castlevania: Lords of Shadow from my buddy, which will keep me occupied for quite some time.

It is an expensive hobby, thats for sure. Piracy makes it seem easier, but, as I've found out from an attempt or two, its much less a hassle to find the money and buy the game. I have about six virtual drives on my desktop trying to run the same .iso and it still won't work. (Can't even get legitimate .iso files to run. Installing the school copy of Windows 7 was a pain in the ass for sure.)

I've looked into selling games I'm finished with, but I tend to be attached to my games and find it hard to sell any back. I'm still hanging on to The Orange Box for my xbox with absolutely no intention of ever putting it into my console again, yet I just can't bring myself to go to the store and sell it.

Ahh well, at least my buddy is nice enough to allow me use of his second WoW account (now my account since the inception of Battle.net 2.0). I'll always have at least one game to play.

Stop calling piracy stealing.
When you people learn?

technically it's impossible to game for free since you will always be paying for electricity (and to an extent internet) unless you are playing solitaire on a laptop that you will never recharge again but I see your point.

I've grown to the point where I will only buy a PC game if it's on a Steam sale and haven't bought an xbox game since September, although that's mainly due to the fact that I don't see my xbox much with it being at home and me at uni. I made the mistake when I first got a debit card to preorder every game that I thought would be decent and getting fairly disappointed most of the time (why the fuck did I get Halo Wars and WET .....) so I also vowed never to pre-order unless I know that it will be amazing ... or in a time frame where I will actually have time to play it (why did Portal 2 get released in the middle of exam revision time ...)

that, and I have a backlog of games from packs I bought in last summer's sale ....

After watching Extra Credits and learning how many full price games my favourite developers typically have to sell to break even, I feel guilty waiting for sales. After all, it's not like I don't ever think these games aren't "worth" the sixty dollar price tag new; think of all the money and man hours that went into its development! It's just thriftiness on my part... everyone loves a bargain. So way to go, James, Daniel, and Allison; you have officially guilted me into pre-ordering LA Noire and Catherine. I hope you're happy to touched my conscience. >:(

Still a big fan of cruising by yard sales/flea markets for older used games though. Picking up an old Gamecube/PS1/PS2 title for ten bucks beats buying it off eBay and paying for shipping any day. In general, I do not care about the quality of the manual or the box; as long as it plays with no issues, I'm a happy duck. Ditto the "bargain bin" games you find at malls and Best Buy; I've found some surprisingly awesome games in those for barely any cash. I will tell you that I bought Order Up! for seven dollars and I got way more than my money's worth of enjoyment out of that. "OH MY GOSH HONEY LOOK AT THIS I AM TOTALLY USING THE WIIMOTE TO MELT BUTTER IN A PAN AAAAAAA SO IMMERSIVE."

Yeah, I don't care who knows I'm a dork.

a lot of pc gaming elitists don't know just how expensive it is to get into that. especially in the hard times like what Russ described.

Well well,
pirate them Borrow without permission with no intent of paying, That's how I get by.

I get heaps of benefits paying regular users go without. Really other than Portal 2 I see no game worth buying this year anyway, most releases (this year) have been rather disappointing imo.

There have been some great games released of late but if a beta sandbox rip of infiniminer can beat most generic console trash then something is wrong. I know they work long and hard to produce these games but it's not meeting the standards it could, we should expect better from them.

I could go on about Sony's customer treatment, piracy law suits and such but not today.

A better alternative is open source games, there are many good open source fps's and just engaging with the community to build something wonderful is a much more filling experience then paying $70> for average game that requires you to pay for DLC.

tl:dr Less cash cows more good games.

koeniginator:
Stop calling piracy stealing.
When you people learn?

Taking something without paying for it...preeeeetty much the definition of stealing. Granted, in some parts of the world, you quite literally have no choice but to pirate.

Azaraxzealot:
a lot of pc gaming elitists don't know just how expensive it is to get into that. especially in the hard times like what Russ described.

Or just don't care.

Given how often the "I can afford it" logic comes up, I'd assume a good chunk of PC elitists are entitled kids.

koeniginator:
Stop calling piracy stealing.
When you people learn?

Piracy is stealing. Get over it.

Russ Pitts:

koeniginator:
Stop calling piracy stealing.
When you people learn?

Piracy is stealing. Get over it.

Susan Arendt:

koeniginator:
Stop calling piracy stealing.
When you people learn?

Taking something without paying for it...preeeeetty much the definition of stealing. Granted, in some parts of the world, you quite literally have no choice but to pirate.

I once saw a picture online that made a differentiation. Just throwing another side of the argument out there, it said:

"Stealing: Removing the original"
"Piracy: Making a copy"

It doesn't make it any less wrong, it just means there's a difference.

believer258:
*snip*

You rang?

image

Anyway they only claim its "stealing" to try to guilt you that little bit more. Not only is it stupid but does anyone think that pirates give half a rabbits anus what others think of them? Seriously.

Piracy is not stealing.[1] This is not a topic for debate. They are two entirely different crimes. If you are not going to use the correct words then maybe you should get someone to spell/grammar/language check your articles before they go up.

Illegal: Yes.
Wrong: Depends on your own moral code.
Stealing: No.

Anyway, some of my best gaming, book and movie purchases have been made using the bargain bin.
Shit I would never have touched otherwise but only picked up since its like $2 and the cover was pretty so why the hell not.
And some of the free MMOs I have played have actually been pretty damn good. Some are even on par with WoW.
[2]

[1] Well technically piracy is stealing so technically using the word "piracy" when talking about file sharing is incorrect. But that is a issue for another day.
[2] Btw, doesn't the escapist tend to suspend people who admit to pirating stuff?...

i know full-well the effects of being broke on my gaming addiction (not that i don't love every second), this might seem crazy or hard to believe and you might wonder how i haven't gone insane. but i only have a ps2 i've had since before xbox came out, and i've been playing the same 13-14 games, and on the off chance i get a new game, and by "new game" i mean been out for at least 3-5 years/ used/ bargain bin...that kinda new ;)

and i have to say, if it weren't for those lil cheapo games on addictinggames.com and other sites of the like, i would've gone insane. they should get an award or something.

Zachary Amaranth:

Azaraxzealot:
a lot of pc gaming elitists don't know just how expensive it is to get into that. especially in the hard times like what Russ described.

Or just don't care.

Given how often the "I can afford it" logic comes up, I'd assume a good chunk of PC elitists are entitled kids.

i can't agree any more. no wonder they have no idea how expensive their hobby is or why they claim 500 to 600 dollars is cheap :P

I stopped buying games for a while, at least on a regular schedule and happened to pick up comics.. They are way more expensive than games >.<

Going broke caused me to sell my mint complete edition of Earthbound along with just about every Snes RPG I owned.

I figure when the day comes that i'm financially secure i'll give myself a treat and blows 2-3k on a backlog of games that give me a warm fuzzy feeling.

Russ Pitts:
As for piracy ... well, I don't like to talk about that. I'm not proud of it, but I would never have played Medal of Honor: Allied Assault any other way. That was one of two games I've pirated in my life, and I regret to admit I didn't "pay for it if I enjoyed it" as so many thieving pirates claim they'll do.

What was the other one?

HankMan:

Russ Pitts:
As for piracy ... well, I don't like to talk about that. I'm not proud of it, but I would never have played Medal of Honor: Allied Assault any other way. That was one of two games I've pirated in my life, and I regret to admit I didn't "pay for it if I enjoyed it" as so many thieving pirates claim they'll do.

What was the other one?

You know, I don't actually remember. It was an older title, something I pulled straight off the net before torrents and sharing services made it easy. And well before I had any morals to speak of. I'm pretty sure I did it, then, just to see if I could.

John Marcone:

Piracy is

/snip/

Illegal: Yes.
Wrong: Depends on your own moral code.
Stealing: No.

<notalawyer>Actually at least in the US distributing software without the copyright holders permission is copyright infringement and is a civil tort, not a criminal offense. It only becomes criminal falling under the fraud category of selling counterfeit goods if the copy is sold for profit.</notalawyer>

And to anyone who says copying software is illegal (in the US) please point out which law is being broken? Or please link to an arrest report of someone charged with "software piracy".

In some countries (Spain) courts found downloading for personal use to be perfectly legal. In Canada downloading copyrighted music for personal use is legal because of a tax on blank media which is distributed to rights holders.

The staff of this site get their paychecks form content publishers so they aren't allowed to present a nuanced view of the subject but the reality is a lot more of a gray area.

Y'all are in the wrong shop if your aim is to legitimize piracy. The Escapist never has and never will condone the practice.

You can draw as many funny pictures as you like, but taking a commercial product without paying for it is immoral, illegal and detrimental to the industry as a whole.

Bottom line: If you love games, pay for the games you play.

if you can't appreciate the wisdom of that sentiment, then you're hopelessly amoral and not worthy of the time and attention game developers spend trying to make you happy.

rembrandtqeinstein:
The staff of this site get their paychecks form content publishers ...

I'd like to see your evidence of this, or else I label you as guilty of misrepresenting the facts as you seem to think are those suggesting piracy is illegal.

John Marcone:

believer258:
*snip*

You rang?

image

Anyway they only claim its "stealing" to try to guilt you that little bit more. Not only is it stupid but does anyone think that pirates give half a rabbits anus what others think of them? Seriously.

Piracy is not stealing.[1] This is not a topic for debate. They are two entirely different crimes. If you are not going to use the correct words then maybe you should get someone to spell/grammar/language check your articles before they go up.

Illegal: Yes.
Wrong: Depends on your own moral code.
Stealing: No.

Anyway, some of my best gaming, book and movie purchases have been made using the bargain bin.
Shit I would never have touched otherwise but only picked up since its like $2 and the cover was pretty so why the hell not.
And some of the free MMOs I have played have actually been pretty damn good. Some are even on par with WoW.
[2]

By copying property that doesn't belong to you (especially when it has a copyright to it which says who can copy, distribute and adapt it) you are still in the end taking that property that doesn't belong to you, some people call that stealing, regardless if you pass it on or not for free or for profit because you copied property that doesn't belong to you. Just like saying that piracy is a form of guilt to make people buy games, it seems like "file sharing" is a way to make people feel less guilty because even though the games were copied without permission from the owner they are giving them away for free.

But about the article, I am basically broke on a day by day basis so I know the feeling of diving through the bargain bin pretty well. Many games that I play today, I probably wouldn't have known about if I could afford all the games I wanted. Same goes with other things like movies and books.

[1] Well technically piracy is stealing so technically using the word "piracy" when talking about file sharing is incorrect. But that is a issue for another day.
[2] Btw, doesn't the escapist tend to suspend people who admit to pirating stuff?...

Russ Pitts:

HankMan:

Russ Pitts:
As for piracy ... well, I don't like to talk about that. I'm not proud of it, but I would never have played Medal of Honor: Allied Assault any other way. That was one of two games I've pirated in my life, and I regret to admit I didn't "pay for it if I enjoyed it" as so many thieving pirates claim they'll do.

What was the other one?

You know, I don't actually remember. It was an older title, something I pulled straight off the net before torrents and sharing services made it easy. And well before I had any morals to speak of. I'm pretty sure I did it, then, just to see if I could.

I tried the same thing once with the original StarCraft. It took hours to download and then the computer could even access it. I'm glad it didn't work, Now I'd never steal from Blizzard.
Sony on the other hand...

I always thought that when people at The Escapist say 'keep out of the basement' they meant that you should never talk about piracy on the forums or admit to it, lest a mod find you and unleash their wrath upon you. To me it seems a bit childish (hear me out). Yes, piracy is a stain on us as gamers, but sometimes it's a subject we need to get out in the open and discuss, much like the many 'Verses Threads' we've all seen here. We've all committed piracy at some point (yes, even me), some more than others though some of us feel guilty and some of us do not. Any guilt I may have had burned out long ago as I've invested thousands of dollars into my hobby (as Russ mentioned, it's a damn expensive pastime) and have gotten to the point where I'm indifferent about it, as I've been through all the phases; having no money for games, having some money for games and having plenty of money for games. It's not hard to see the appeal when you've go nothing left, like how a blunt sounds like a good idea to someone in a lot of pain. I guess I expected people to be used to idea instead of cramming it in the 'basement' so to speak, and calling it off-limits. But I suppose that the more you talk about it the more touchy people become about it.

Moral: Yes it's wrong, but not everyone is able to dismiss it as a foul taboo as most people do.

Man, I needed to get that off my chest.

Russ Pitts:

rembrandtqeinstein:
The staff of this site get their paychecks form content publishers ...

I'd like to see your evidence of this, or else I label you as guilty of misrepresenting the facts as you seem to think are those suggesting piracy is illegal.

Here is my reasoning for the statement but feel free to correct me if anything is wrong.

This site is supported by advertising. A large percentage of purchasers of this advertising space are content publishers.

If a staff member prints any opinion other than "piracy is illegal, immoral, and anyone engaging in it is a dickbag, end of story" then it increases the possibility of a content publisher thinking the an official statement condones piracy. Since content publishers hate and fear losing control of "their" content/golden goose they will rabidly penalize anyone who doesn't actively and enthusiastically toe the party line.

Therefore even if a staff member personally feels there is room for discussion they can't express their opinion as a staff member. However the staff members that are actually in lockstep with the publishers against copyright infringement can express that opinion freely.

This isn't a slight against the staff or the publication, that is just the nature of advertising supported media. The ones who pay the bills are the ones who call the shots.

believer258:

Russ Pitts:

koeniginator:
Stop calling piracy stealing.
When you people learn?

Piracy is stealing. Get over it.

Susan Arendt:

koeniginator:
Stop calling piracy stealing.
When you people learn?

Taking something without paying for it...preeeeetty much the definition of stealing. Granted, in some parts of the world, you quite literally have no choice but to pirate.

I once saw a picture online that made a differentiation. Just throwing another side of the argument out there, it said:

"Stealing: Removing the original"
"Piracy: Making a copy"

It doesn't make it any less wrong, it just means there's a difference.

There's only two technical differences really, one is that with stealing, the retailer also loses some revenue and that somebody who pirates wouldn't necessarily steal the product from a shelf.
Years ago (when I didn't have a regular job) I pirated more than a few games. Now, if pirating wasn't an option, I probably would've not played those games at all. I am also happy to admit that I did buy New copies of the good games (unreal tournament, sims) when I was able to. So if it weren't for pirating, they may have not have made those sales.
I'm not saying this to justify pirating or anything. I'm just wondering if my experience is that uncommon or if publishers have ever thought of taking advantage of the free marketing they get from pirating.

Maybe what they should do is saturate the torrents and p2ps with sample copies of their games. Rooting through everything would discourage the guys pirating because they're dicks who can afford it and it would give those pirating just because they're broke more incentive to buy the real thing when they can.

Maybe I'm overestimating how many people would actually do the stand up thing and buy the game when they can: only pirate because it's really all they can afford.
Am I?

If you buy a game, you have the right to use the game 24/7 from since you bought it till you die and are not owning it any more or you go to jail or something.

As long as you yourself and however people you've shared that game with do not use it more than it is logically possible for it to have been used in the time that elapsed since your purchase (so, if you bought it 3 days ago, you shouldn't have used it for more than the 72 hours that have elapsed between however many people it is shared) you're actually not doing anything wrong or taking anything you don't already own by allowing people to use the game for the time you won't be.

File sharing is a low-tech version of physically lending something through teleportation basically, we can't do that yet since there is no such technology but we simulate it by file sharing.

Letting anyone who is into a game you like play it when you're not playing it and doing so in a way that your game gets the most out of the use you purchased with real money shouldn't make you feel wrong, right?

rembrandtqeinstein:

Russ Pitts:

rembrandtqeinstein:
The staff of this site get their paychecks form content publishers ...

I'd like to see your evidence of this, or else I label you as guilty of misrepresenting the facts as you seem to think are those suggesting piracy is illegal.

Here is my reasoning for the statement but feel free to correct me if anything is wrong.

This site is supported by advertising. A large percentage of purchasers of this advertising space are content publishers.

If a staff member prints any opinion other than "piracy is illegal, immoral, and anyone engaging in it is a dickbag, end of story" then it increases the possibility of a content publisher thinking the an official statement condones piracy. Since content publishers hate and fear losing control of "their" content/golden goose they will rabidly penalize anyone who doesn't actively and enthusiastically toe the party line.

Therefore even if a staff member personally feels there is room for discussion they can't express their opinion as a staff member. However the staff members that are actually in lockstep with the publishers against copyright infringement can express that opinion freely.

This isn't a slight against the staff or the publication, that is just the nature of advertising supported media. The ones who pay the bills are the ones who call the shots.

That's not reasoning, per se, that's a lot of assumptions propped up with ignorance of how the industry actually works.

It's been my policy to not directly respond to every allegation that I or anyone in the employ of this site am on the take or receiving income directly from game publishers because it's just not true and never has been. Some people in this business are, so I understand how one could get the impression we're in that category, but we aren't. End of story. Honestly, that's been raised and addressed so many times that to hear it coming from you, now, suggests you just haven't been paying attention. Or simply enjoy making unfounded allegations as much as you enjoy pirating games ;)

Seriously, we get that complaint a lot, and there's never anything to it. Just an assumption based on some smart-aleck's "understanding" of "how the world works," without any real-world experience in the business to back it up.

Bottom line: Our editorial opinions are not and never have been compromised by relationships with game publishers. Advertisers buy space on the website, but they do not buy our words. They're as free to refuse to buy that space based on their annoyance with our words as we are to write the words we believe in, regardless of their intent to buy space on our site. We have two separate rooms in our office where advertising space is sold and where content is created, respectively. The two sides have as little influence with each other as my opinion that piracy is bad has with some members of this site's non-spending habits. ;) Reviews, news, editorials, features, videos and everything else are solely the product of our editorial team and are not for sale. Period.

Also not for sale: my opinion that piracy is bad for the industry. That's not only what I personally believe, but also just plain common sense. Here's why: If people are consuming a commercial product, which costs money to create, but not paying money to consume it, then the valuation of that product will be effected in one direction or the other. That's straight-up basic economics. Either the perceived price of that product (irrespective of the product's cost to manufacture) will decrease such that the manufacturer will no longer be able to adequately charge for the product in order to continue funding it's manufacture, or the valuation for those who are willing to pay will increase to offset the decline in revenue from those who are not.

On the one hand we enter into a scenario where the up-front payment model will fall away, and publishers will instead be forced to invest in long-tail or incremental pricing such as EA's project $10 or in-game advertising, or chose to implement potentially abusive DRM technologies in order to ensure that those who are playing are also paying. On the other hand, games prices would increase, forcing many lower-income users out of the marketplace and forcing those who are able to absorb the additional cost to shoulder more of the burden imposed on them by pirates. Either way, the very real potential for a videogame market crash exists as a direct result of remedies game publishers are being forced to take in order to continue compensating the talented individuals who are making the games you are not paying for. Either the pricing models and DRM will drive consumers out of the market, or the increase in price will. This is not supposition. This is what happens when market forces collide. Also a risk is that production of lower-tier, casual or youth/non-core games and shovelware will increase since consumers of that kind of content don't typically pirate, so the felt costs of production of that content is actually lower. This, too, could negatively impact the market, since a space overcrowded with low-quality or low-impact games will also alienate the core audience, as we observed in the 1980 videogame market crash. So, as I'm sure you'll agree, no matter how the industry chooses to respond to the growing threat of piracy, it will be the consumer who gets fucked the hardest and it will not be the publisher, nor the developer doing the fucking, but the pirater.

HankMan:

Russ Pitts:

HankMan:

What was the other one?

You know, I don't actually remember. It was an older title, something I pulled straight off the net before torrents and sharing services made it easy. And well before I had any morals to speak of. I'm pretty sure I did it, then, just to see if I could.

I tried the same thing once with the original StarCraft. It took hours to download and then the computer could even access it. I'm glad it didn't work, Now I'd never steal from Blizzard.
Sony on the other hand...

Good times on the internet for sure. You're taking a lot of risks when pirating stuff. between zombie viruses, legals challenges and simply the investment of time, I've found it to be just not worth it.

Here's the thing, even if you "only occasionally" pirate a game, you're still legitimizing the acts of a person who has either hacked the source code outright, or has purchased a game with the intent of illegally distributing it online.

So, while I may be willing to grant that the act of playing a pirated game is not exactly the worst crime against humanity, in order for one to have acquired that pirated copy, someone else has had to create it. You can't have one without the other.

It's like buying stolen electronics because they're cheaper and not caring that someone else was robbed from in order to make your purchase less expensive. It's only justifiable if you refuse to acknowledge the reality of the world in which you are living and the consequences of your own actions in that world.

Great responses, I don't agree with you but you convinced me to contribute to your beer and pizza fund.

you have a "moral code"

I am so glad I don't have one of those it makes life so much more expensive.

Thanks Escapist ! That was 20 minutes of enjoyment!
I'm enjoying the shit out of gaming at the moment,but typically I don't spend more than 10 on a game.However it annoys me that nintendo first party titles can be so expensive.For example: Halo 3 and Super Mario Galaxy.Both have a score of above 90/100 on metacritic. Both have had multiple sequels.Both had been released in 2007. Both have sold more than 8 million copies.The prices should be pretty similar right?
Halo 3's price: 6.80 or 5.15 for the greatest hits version.Super Mario Galaxy's price? 25.50 I find this utterly ridiculous for 2 brilliant games that the nintendo one is three times more expensive.

I know what you mean, Russ. I am patiently waiting for Bulletstorm to go on sale on Steam to get it. There was one Let's Play on Youtube that was fun to watch but the guy hasn't followed through lately. I'm going nuts.
I did pre-purchase Portal 2, though. But with the 10% discount on that plus the free copy of Portal I could give to a gaming buddy, it was quite the deal.
The price of a lot of new games these days is getting to be insane. It really makes me wonder if companies are just refusing to take the time and really research into what could be done to trim costs. I don't doubt that right now it is actually expensive to put out a top-level game, but one begs the question with the smaller games that only cost $10-$20 and are pretty decent quality, like Magicka and Minecraft, what are the big companies doing wrong?

Russ Pitts:
Good times on the internet for sure. You're taking a lot of risks when pirating stuff. between zombie viruses, legals challenges and simply the investment of time, I've found it to be just not worth it.

Here's the thing, even if you "only occasionally" pirate a game, you're still legitimizing the acts of a person who has either hacked the source code outright, or has purchased a game with the intent of illegally distributing it online.

So, while I may be willing to grant that the act of playing a pirated game is not exactly the worst crime against humanity, in order for one to have acquired that pirated copy, someone else has had to create it. You can't have one without the other.

It's like buying stolen electronics because they're cheaper and not caring that someone else was robbed from in order to make your purchase less expensive. It's only justifiable if you refuse to acknowledge the reality of the world in which you are living and the consequences of your own actions in that world.

Well said, Kane. Er, Evil Director, sir. Er, Lord Gaming Master of the Multiverse.*
OT: No, really, that was well put out there. The position of piracy to demo a product that otherwise doesn't have a demo does have its merits, but it only encourages the person who snagged the cracked game in the first place to continue what they are doing. Not to mention those who want to take advantage of downloaders to snatch their personal info or just eff up their computers.
P.T. Barnum would be proud. But the idea is the sucker is supposed to learn from what happens to them, not just continue being suckered by the same thing.
*: These titles hold no trademark or copyright and can be used by the beneficiary for his amusement and ego-boosting. Anybody using them for their own benefit except the beneficiary are subject to his whim and amusement and method of torture.

Russ Pitts:

On the one hand we enter into a scenario where the up-front payment model will fall away, and publishers will instead be forced to invest in long-tail or incremental pricing such as EA's project $10 or in-game advertising, or chose to implement potentially abusive DRM technologies in order to ensure that those who are playing are also paying. On the other hand, games prices would increase, forcing many lower-income users out of the marketplace and forcing those who are able to absorb the additional cost to shoulder more of the burden imposed on them by pirates. Either way, the very real potential for a videogame market crash exists as a direct result of remedies game publishers are being forced to take in order to continue compensating the talented individuals who are making the games you are not paying for. Either the pricing models and DRM will drive consumers out of the market, or the increase in price will. This is not supposition. This is what happens when market forces collide. Also a risk is that production of lower-tier, casual or youth/non-core games and shovelware will increase since consumers of that kind of content don't typically pirate, so the felt costs of production of that content is actually lower. This, too, could negatively impact the market, since a space overcrowded with low-quality or low-impact games will also alienate the core audience, as we observed in the 1980 videogame market crash. So, as I'm sure you'll agree, no matter how the industry chooses to respond to the growing threat of piracy, it will be the consumer who gets fucked the hardest and it will not be the publisher, nor the developer doing the fucking, but the pirater.

I think you got that backwards. The abusive DRM measures gets implemented in any case, and is meant to limit consumer rights for paying customers. The pirates never see the DRM anyway. Of course the developers use piracy as an excuse but they will always be able to do that.

If consumers can get fucked, we will get fucked by the industry - piracy or no piracy.

In short the industry will make as much profit as they can. And if they can't make a profit they will do something else.

Bostur:

In short the industry will make as much profit as they can. And if they can't make a profit they will do something else.

Only if there is a industry for video games, Which is why so many speak up about this issue. As more and more people pirate games; less money can be made in selling and making video games. Yes companies are looking to profit but then again every business must make a profit just like this web site or with a radio station and even non-profits have to profit.

The local efforts I run to help stop child abuse in my area couldn't run if it wasn't "profiting" with donations, without money we couldn't even afford to get the gas to get from point A to B. Like many have said, "If people don't pay for video games, there won't be many if any"

It's like beepers,everyone know has a cell phone, people stopped buying beepers, and look how many beeper only stores/manufactures there now.

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