The Witcher 2: Assassins of Kings Review

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I pretty much agree with what he said about it. The game is really good and fun but combat is so painfully annoying. Overall the controls are clunky, you're likely to set off a trap by accidentally walking onto it when trying to disarm it. Not to mention that guarding and spells pulling from the same resource makes guarding all but useless, especially when fighting groups of enemies because you can't afford to just stand there. I've heard riposte is good but I went magic so idk.

The ability to lock on to an enemy would have improved the combat drastically, because it's really annoying to roll away from an attack and then try to turn and strike back only to have your character leap towards the guy at the back of a cluster of enemies, pretty much autodeath unless you do same fancy rolling.

That said the actual battles only get hard when some mechanic screws me over, such as I hit someone with the aard and it sends them flying towards me instead of away and once they collide with me they immediately start swinging. That said, fighting a group of enemies is the hardest part about this game, and it's mostly just kiting around hitting them with aard and one shotting whoever gets stunned, your flavor may differ since you can use bombs and stuff but still lots of kiting. 1on1 boss fights, that don't have something special you have to do, are as simple as spamming throwing daggers.

Overall the game has a weird difficulty. I can sense that it's trying to do it so you have to actually be tactical and fight like someone who isn't god of all creation, but the combat system just doesn't have the fluidity and precision to accommodate that.

That's not to say the game isn't amazing, and to me it's only a lock-on system and some combat balancing away from being perfect. Contrary to what this reviewer says, everyone seems to be more badass than Geralt. They just don't have spells and potions.

Edit: I guess I should note that I play this game with a 360 controller. Idk how targeting goes with mouse/keyboard but it shouldn't matter since it has in game support for the gamepad.

rsvp42:

bob1052:

rsvp42:

Then don't play DA2 on normal. There are two levels above that and it's adjustable at any time.

Then don't complain about difficulty of TW2 on hard. There are two levels below that and it's adjustable at any time.

Touche. However, that means we can't assume how sophisticated someone likes their games based on that. The two simply have different definitions of "normal."

That being said, normal in TW2 isn't hard, but those first scenarios were the hardest normal I think I've ever played. You can't take many hits and the flow of combat should have been introduced in a better way. Heck, even a short separate tutorial would have been nice, something to explain the signs at least. I realize that figuring out fight mechanics isn't that hard, but many games do a great job of teaching how to play them by integrating it into an easier intro. This is a mixed criticism for me because on the one hand I like figuring out these things, but on the other I feel like I could have been prepared better and saved myself some time. No matter how you slice it, it's a tough intro for someone like me coming into the series fresh.

If you look at the four dialog options at the very start of the game you get:

"The morning, the king summoned me."
"The assault."
"What ultimately happened to the dragon?"
"We split up at the monastery."

If you look at them it is immediately obvious that the first one starts at the beginning, and the next three all refer to things you have no idea about.

What assault is happening? What dragon is involved? When did we go to a monastery?

Choosing the morning, which part of the impossible to see through deception is listed as the first option, defines the assault and provides tidbits on the dragon, leaving you at the top of a siege tower awaiting the assault to begin.

That leads you to the next logical, chronological, and amazingly, the second choice on the list: "The assault". The first battle you get in is a skirmish in which you walk around with no enemies swinging at you, instead they are all preoccupied with other combatants and you, along with the tool tips that, according to the review you die if you even glance at them, but really you have as long as you need with them in this no danger situation, can practice all you want chopping enemies down from behind. You then go through progressively increased difficulty fights, starting with two enemies as soon as you drop off the wall. Then you face an knight in full plate and a guard with a shield and eventually you reach the so man in charge.

After completing the assault you have the few tidbits about the dragon you picked up earlier, but no clue about any monastery, so the next logical choice appears to be the dragon. This ends at the monastery and guess which choice you have left.

The idea that this prologue is cryptic and in need of Dan Brown (note: he doesn't actually write good mysteries, he just makes them so incoherent and twisting needlessly and endlessly but still) to properly decode and that it doesn't serve as a proper tutorial is bullocks.

I honestly thought thought that The Witcher 2 was an amazing, but incredibly flawed title. The story was amazing, but the ending was possibly the worst I've ever seen in any form of media with a story. The preparation before combat was a cool idea, but the crafting and alchemy systems were... iffy, at best. The combat was great, but a lot of the complexity isn't explained to you towards the start of the game, and towards the end you're so powerful it doesn't matter even on hard. On the other hand, there's something that The Witcher 2 just gets right. Even if the combat ranges from ridiculously hard to insanely easy, it remains reasonably fun throughout. And the atmosphere is amazing.
I'll admit, I love both Dragon Age games as well. Dragon Age 2 was a good game that had some serious, serious problems. The Witcher 2 is similar in this respect, in my opinion. It has a lot of brilliant points, and some terrible ones. However, I would also say that the Witcher 2's main issues could probably be patched out with a bunch of balance tweaks and making sure that crafting items don't have weight or something to fix inventory space problems.

tetron:

That's not to say the game isn't amazing, and to me it's only a lock-on system and some combat balancing away from being perfect. Contrary to what this reviewer says, everyone seems to be more badass than Geralt. They just don't have spells and potions.

The lock on is left Alt. It's pretty buggy, but hopefully that helps. I believe they do tell you that in-game, but it's another one of the tutorial messages that pops up in the middle of a fight. It's surprisingly hard to read and swordfight at the same time.

rsvp42:

Xzi:

The game has its flaws, but this review picked out few of the actual ones. There was a lot more nit-picking about difficulty and complexity than anything else, and these are not inherently bad things. When you give a game like DA2, in which you can literally auto-attack your way through every encounter on normal, a perfect score, it's pretty obvious what your preferred level of sophistication in games is.

Then don't play DA2 on normal. There are two levels above that and it's adjustable at any time.

I played it on hard and never had to use anything but a couple of AoE attacks per encounter. Regardless of the difficulty setting, DA2 was not built to be game of strategy, nor one that requires much thought at all. It's an action game at its heart, and doesn't live up to DA:O in regards to smart game design. That being the case, obviously it doesn't live up to the Witcher 2, either.

JerrytheBullfrog:

Someone pointed out that it would be out of character for this badass Warmaster to have to go through a "and here's how you block" tutorial, so I was thinking - wouldn't it be cool if you started the game as some sort of neophyte recruit who was being GIVEN a lesson by *the* Geralt himself? That'd preserve Geralt as a wise experienced warrior while still introduce newbies to the game.

And then maybe the recruit gets killed and Geralt takes over, providing the player with an immediate emotional attachment to the game. I think it would have been a cool idea.

Based off the ending of the first, and Geralt's current situation in the second, that really isn't possible.

Haven't tried the game and not sure if I'll ever have the time and money to get my hands on it, but DAMN those combat animations looked nice!

JerrytheBullfrog:

Someone pointed out that it would be out of character for this badass Warmaster to have to go through a "and here's how you block" tutorial, so I was thinking - wouldn't it be cool if you started the game as some sort of neophyte recruit who was being GIVEN a lesson by *the* Geralt himself? That'd preserve Geralt as a wise experienced warrior while still introduce newbies to the game.

And then maybe the recruit gets killed and Geralt takes over, providing the player with an immediate emotional attachment to the game. I think it would have been a cool idea.

That's why I figure it should be optional if it were just a regular tutorial. And if not that, then just scale the fight difficulty down in the beginning. It's just getting easier so far and I know it's simply because I didn't know how to fight in the beginning. To me, the idea that some badass Witcher is getting killed over and can barely handle a few hits is worse than the prospect of a tutorial. I just wanted to get up to speed without having to see that damn 'load from last save' screen so many times.

Let me say this: the Witcher 2 was this year's juicy bone thrown to hardcore RPG enthusiasts. Some Escapists might call me an elitist, but I am glad that this game does not pull any punches with difficulty.

Perhaps I should also note that the portion of the game after the prologue isn't easier than the prologue itself - it just seems that way because the prologue really, really unforgiving. The difficulty curve isn't fucked - it just sets the bar really high to begin with.

Also, I now think that Tito is a wuss.

bob1052:
snip

I did play them in that order, but there's no reason to be able to do them out of order except for the token sense of choice it gives, which is ultimately meaningless. Why did we need choice there? But since I was never told what the signs did or what their significance was in a fight and I knew they shared vigor with blocking, I never did the solo fights properly. The very first solo fight against the guys at the ballista was really tough because I was just using Igni and Aard. It was possible to get attacked by way more guys than I knew how to handle at once (and no those first fights at the wall teach you nothing but how to right and left click). Now I feel stupid for not using other signs, but I had to learn all that through sheer attrition. It wasn't until I was being killed repeatedly by Scoia'tel during that one quest outside Flotsam that I finally learned how to handle 3-4 attackers at once.

It's not a game-ruiner in the slightest, but it could have been balanced a lot better. The problem was not the difficulty level, it was that I didn't know what to do.

Here's something DA2 did really well, actually. The idea of giving a short tutorial in the beginning and making it part of Varric's exaggerated storytelling was a really clever way to handle introducing the combat.

Oh the joys of the wars over witcher 2's difficulty. Never gets tiring.

My problem with the game wasn't the lack of tutorial really, as Demon's Souls also threw you in without much to go on. I think what annoyed me most was, unlike Demon's Souls(Which I really enjoyed the combat for, by the way, so it isn't about not liking difficulty), roll and guard feel so unresponsive at the start of the game. Admittedly they do improve with talents, but it wasn't necessary to nerf roll and guard so much for the beginning so that talents could improve it. Demon's Souls managed to be genuinly challenging with a working roll and guard.

Other than that I'm genuinly enjoying the game so far. Don't mind the UI, other than the fact it's awfully slow, though todays patch did improve it slightly. That said todays patch also broke the analog sticks slightly, now they can't be used in menu's. Just hope thats fixed in the next patch. The story and characters are interesting, the locations are amazing, and overall I'm loving it, despite the minor annoyance at the start of the game.

Ah the Escapist... Bioware fanboys to the end... even the editors.

Dragon Age II- Escapist: 100% Metacritic: 79%
Witcher 2- Escapist: 70% Metacritic: 89%

BW gets a +21% over Meta, CPR gets a -21%.

Jesus Christ, you guys really need to get those freaking nostalgia glasses off.

As Skyrim isn't made by BW, I'm calling the Escapist giving it between a 60 and 80%.

The Rasmussen of RPG reviews. Congrats on the title.

Review seems even handed to me. I got the Witcher I and wasn't a fan, not because it was hard (I in fact found it very easy) but was just boring. I'm well aware this game is probably different but if the first game in a series doesn't grab me, I'm done :) I think that's fair.

bob1052:

JerrytheBullfrog:

Someone pointed out that it would be out of character for this badass Warmaster to have to go through a "and here's how you block" tutorial, so I was thinking - wouldn't it be cool if you started the game as some sort of neophyte recruit who was being GIVEN a lesson by *the* Geralt himself? That'd preserve Geralt as a wise experienced warrior while still introduce newbies to the game.

And then maybe the recruit gets killed and Geralt takes over, providing the player with an immediate emotional attachment to the game. I think it would have been a cool idea.

Based off the ending of the first, and Geralt's current situation in the second, that really isn't possible.

Well, in regards to training a recruit, a large part of the 2nd English book written by Andrzej is about Geralt training a protege...however I think this precedes the Witcher saga and the game. But that would be cool if it could be used as a tutorial.

Maybe we guys that like challenging are getting too rough. But try understanding how frustating this day and age are for us.

I love the game and, to be honest, thought that the complaint about the steep learning curve were exagerrated. This review changed my mind on the issue a bit. After reading this I realise that I happened to play the prologue in the "correct" sequence - so the mechanics were explained as I needed to know them. I now realise that I was lucky to have done it this way as the game allows you to play them in whatever order you choose (which would be quite hard).

Fair point but I still love it. I thinks its fantastic but could not unequivocally recommend it to everybody and anybody.

Omnific One:
Ah the Escapist... Bioware fanboys to the end... even the editors.

Dragon Age II- Escapist: 100% Metacritic: 79%
Witcher 2- Escapist: 70% Metacritic: 89%

Jesus Christ, you guys really need to get those freaking nostalgia glasses off.

As Skyrim isn't made by BW, I'm calling the Escapist giving it between a 60 and 80%.

The Rasmussen of RPG reviews. Congrats on the title.

Before anyone goes crazy about the use of metacritic in this comment, that score is actually based on critic reviews, not user. Even IGN, one of the most Xbox fanboy heavy sites I've seen, gave it a 9. Just sayin.

Agreed Greg. Story, Plot, and Characters were fantastically done, but gameplay and anything involving such sucked the fun of the story out. I haven't even finished it yet because I just got so damn bored of it.

I'm a BIG fan of the game...and even bought both editions of the first game and played it in different languages.

But I'm also one of the guys who went and jumped in the Dragon part of the prologue first, and yeah it was frustrating as hell. Yes, I know, duh, FIRE, but even when I skipped through the gap unscathed suddenly he was on fire for no reason, and yeah I did it many times again and again. And the whole damn place was on fire, I couldn't tell whether I was flaming because the dragon breathed on me or because somethings were falling apart and I was too slow.

The rest of the fighting so far seems ok, a little clunky, but maybe just because I don't have the timing down so well yet. Because there are moments of pure sword ballet if you get it just right, leaping from one enemy to the next when they are open. So I'm looking forward to some of the fluidity coming back upon levelling up, which is what many say is what happens later.

The other issue I had with it was inventory, but only because there wasn't a box storage system. I wouldn't care actually, I'm not one for lugging and hoarding stuff anyways, but it's a little difficult to tell what will be crucial later and what won't be, so I just kinda sell "common" stuff and hold onto the "rare".

Really?!?! The same reviewer who gave Auto-attack Age 2 a 5/5 gave The Witcher 2 only 3.5 stars? Really?! Wow. I mean wow. Just wow. Greg what were you smoking when you wrote these reviews? Because I want some of that.

Omnific One:
Ah the Escapist... Bioware fanboys to the end... even the editors.

Dragon Age II- Escapist: 100% Metacritic: 79%
Witcher 2- Escapist: 70% Metacritic: 89%

Jesus Christ, you guys really need to get those freaking nostalgia glasses off.

As Skyrim isn't made by BW, I'm calling the Escapist giving it between a 60 and 80%.

The Rasmussen of RPG reviews. Congrats on the title.

Metacritic can be trusted. Also witcher 2 has less than 1/2 the reviews that dragon age 2 does. I disagree with Tito too, the game is perfect and just isn't for the casuals. PC is the bestest of all the consoles EVAR! It has no bugs, it doesn't re-use anything, and the inventory is easy to manage if you're not a noob. That light attack, heavy attack sword system is too deep for people.

WaaghPowa:

Before anyone goes crazy about the use of metacritic in this comment, that score is actually based on critic reviews, not user. Even IGN, one of the most Xbox fanboy heavy sites I've seen, gave it a 9. Just sayin.

IGN isn't xbox fanboy heavy, it's fanboy heavy. Anything with a lot of fanboys gets pandered too. Look at the comments so far.

I summed up what I had problems with in an earlier post.

Rationalization:
The game has some serious issues, I'm glad that you think it's a perfect game that can't be critisized. Game killing bugs, I'm experiencing one now. All of my controls are locked up and after reloading my character it is stuck. Once you're in a town you can't leave until the next part of the story happens. It's very close to what DA2 did, you know how everyone loved that. Despite having an inventory maximum, there is no sorting. I keep going over the weight limit but I can't sort by weight to see what is dragging me down. There are junk items, but no junk folder. You have to search through each item individually to find it. The camera sucks, if a loot bag and a torch are next to it, one of them is going to be overriden. The auto-save system doesn't always save, and your saves sometimes overide each other making a huge messs and not knowing where you want to load from. The journal is extremely lacking, and often won't tell you what you need to know to play the game.

The sword combat consists of light attack, and heavy attack, with no discernable combos. You can only cast 2 signs at a time(spells) and it takes a while before you can cast another. Trying to throw things is annoying and will sometimes just not work. The game also won't tell you when you're out of ammo. Input lag will kill you, and input lag does happen. There is only 2 systems of sound, music and everything else. Want to turn down the extremely loud wind that is drowning out the dialogue? Good luck because it's on the same level as the dialogue. Some of these things could be adjusted by going through the files of the game, but arn't fixable easily.

Edit: @bob1052 Pointed out that I had missed the flat boosts, and was going in to regeneration.

after giving da2 5 stars with the one location boring characters and no story how can you give this 3.this just doesnt add up.

I'm glad that there is a game out there that says "fuck you figure it out for yourself", instead of the hand holding that has become so commonplace. There is a reason Dwarf Fortress is so appealing, some people love the challenge of discovering things on their own.

I don't see that as shoddy design, just an old school choice.

What puzzles me is that in the whole (video) review is not a single word about the choice system in Witcher2, which does not give you an illusion of choice but rather manifests many decisions of the player in the real game, and not just in different dialogue options but rather in game content, either immidiatly or later on. I would call it a "horizontal" game design, which does indeed shorten the lenght of the individual playthrough, thinking of the player manouvering through the game from bottom to top, but on the opposite side does provide replay value. The developer is taking a risk here, as people will maybe say the game is too short. I would have liked to see that aspect being discussed.

I think the other points depend on personal taste. Do you like the game to hand you everything on a plate or do you like to explore and learn from failure. Do you like apples or oranges. Do you like to have convenience food in a restaurant or do you prefer to cook for yourself. Both is good and whatever floats your boat is great (as long as noone forces the other to eat oranges when they want apples).

Edit: And since the game genre has become an industry with profit in mind, catering to the majority for maximum revenue, I had my fair share of oranges tbh.

Reading this review was like reading a review of a Bergman or Tarkovsky film, where the reviewer was lamenting that the work of art was not more like another standard superhero film. Sad indeed.

Besides, reading the manual was not even necessary to adjust to the fantastic combat system. Some quick trial and error, and voilą. As for the "poorly explained side quests", you ought try reading the in-game journal with the relevant monster information. It is spelled out which bomb you need. Honestly...

The developer said in an interview that they had been inspired by Demon's Souls, and it shows. This is a work of art of nearly the same lofty heights, and that's not something I say lightly. Geralt is exactly as responsive as he is supposed to be, which makes him feel like a real person rather than a floating, fire-spewing camera with swooshing swords attached to him. You need to pay careful attention to your position, vigour, an health, making combat an exciting exercise in tactics and skill.

There is a few mechanical shortcomings, granted, such as the doors in the game, but that is nit-picking, really. Hopefully, no one has been dissuaded from purchasing this game because of this strange review. And The LotR pun was painful, aye...

EDIT: As for the potions, it seems to me that taking the time to unscrew an chug a potion during the middle of a frantic sword fight. A holdover from the meditation system? Please... If anything, it seems much more in line with the source material, which focused a lot on the importance of proper metabolism in regards to potions.

Although I support your desire to quell egregious fanboyism, I feel like I should point out a couple things:

Rationalization:
You can only cast 2 signs at a time(spells) and it takes a while before you can cast another.

If you're referring to the vigor bar, it only has two notches in the beginning, hence two casts. You get a third soon after (and I assume even more later), as well as abilities that refill it faster both in and out of combat.

Rationalization:
Want to turn down the extremely loud wind that is drowning out the dialogue? Good luck because it's on the same level as the dialogue.

So far, I've only seen this happen once. It made me leave on subtitles because I have no way of knowing when it will happen again, but I wouldn't blow that issue out of proportion.

MatsVS:

There is a few mechanical shortcomings, granted, such as the doors in the game, but that is nit-picking, really. Hopefully, no one has been dissuaded from purchasing this game because of this strange review.

The doors are actually something I was really impressed by.

It is tough to notice but right after going through a door (it also happens in certain hallways and cave entrances that are shrouded by vines in the forest surrounding Flotsam) but for the first split second all textures are incredibly low resolution.

You probably notice that the game is graphically intense on your system. That door that you need to awkwardly, and they do get pretty awkward, actually blocks your view, allowing them to downgrade all the textures and not lock your frames at 15 or force you to drop your settings any lower.

You might have also noticed how you can sometimes get a quarter second loading screen when going through a door or one of these cave entrances, thats the game prepping the area ahead, it normally can keep up with you changing in real time but sometimes it needs to load for a moment. If they didn't use those doors it would be much less pretty and much less fluid when travelling from one side of a region to another.

*sigh*

This review sure has the fanatics crawling out of the woodwork like rats.

Anyway, I'm not finding the game all that difficult. Except for the dragon part. Not gonna lie, that was utter balls.

I'm loving this game, it's refreshing to have a challenge.

That said, I am absolutely loathing those damn Endrega Queens. I killed the farther one first, and now I'm trying to kill the one next to town but I can't seem to manage it.

sta697:
after giving da2 5 stars with the one location boring characters and no story how can you give this 3.this just doesnt add up.

In DA2's defense, the characters were the highlight. Really unique and had some great banter. It also had many locations, they were simply reused too many times, which is the main issue with the game. Well, that and the exploding bodies. And it had a story, it was just episodic instead of being one long epic.

bob1052:
The doors are actually something I was really impressed by.

It is tough to notice but right after going through a door (it also happens in certain hallways and cave entrances that are shrouded by vines in the forest surrounding Flotsam) but for the first split second all textures are incredibly low resolution.

You probably notice that the game is graphically intense on your system. That door that you need to awkwardly, and they do get pretty awkward, actually blocks your view, allowing them to downgrade all the textures and not lock your frames at 15 or force you to drop your settings any lower.

You might have also noticed how you can sometimes get a quarter second loading screen when going through a door or one of these cave entrances, thats the game prepping the area ahead, it normally can keep up with you changing in real time but sometimes it needs to load for a moment. If they didn't use those doors it would be much less pretty and much less fluid when travelling from one side of a region to another.

Aye, all you say is true, but I was rather thinking about how only one person could pass through a door each time it was opened. It made for an awkward fight or two. But yes, concessions in game design such as these are to be expected on graphic-heavy releases, so I don't count it a genuine flaw.

Frankly, I'm one of the people on the "The same reviewer who gave DA2 a 5/5, gave The Witcher 2 a mark of 3.5?!?" opinion, but I'll skip that.

All I need to say is, that for the last few days I've been enjoying the game immensely. Awesome setting and visuals aside, I'm really glad the game offers some challenge. It's one of the few games doing that lately, a very unfortunate tendency.

sta697:
after giving da2 5 stars with the one location boring characters and no story how can you give this 3.this just doesnt add up.

It's a matter of taste i guess. I never took his reviews seriously, because most of the time i had different opinions, but this one is just bad.

Omnific One:
Ah the Escapist... Bioware fanboys to the end... even the editors.

Dragon Age II- Escapist: 100% Metacritic: 79%
Witcher 2- Escapist: 70% Metacritic: 89%

BW gets a +21% over Meta, CPR gets a -21%.

Jesus Christ, you guys really need to get those freaking nostalgia glasses off.

As Skyrim isn't made by BW, I'm calling the Escapist giving it between a 60 and 80%.

The Rasmussen of RPG reviews. Congrats on the title.

I just want to point out, comparing a 5-star system to a percentage system is kind of disingenuous. This system was created so that 3 stars would be average, whereas 60% on Metacritic is seen as god awful. Adam Sessler from Xplay (which uses the same 5-star system) has actually fought to have his reviews removed from Metacritic for this reason.

Not to say that you're wrong, just be careful with those cross-review-system comparisons. It's deceptive.

OT: I haven't played W2 yet for want of money, but it really, really intrigues me. Can't wait to give it a shot.

After the amount of hate Sterling got for his review of the Witcher I'm surprised it didn't fair much better here. The amount of people calling him a troll for only giving it 6 out of 10 made me think the game was the second coming of christ considering how vehemently people jumped to it's defense. Thanks to Greg and everyone who can't understand that this is just his opinion of the game for reassuring me once again that the internet is just full of complaining dipshits.

If it does end up on xbox I'll probably get it then. Then again I'm one of those people who actually realises a 6 or a 7 isn't actually a bad score. Just not great.

Another thing people seem to miss that metacritic is an average. Meaning that plenty of reviewers would have given it less than the average.

Here I know he pisses you off and now he can piss you off and tell you why you're wrong for attacking reviewers for having a fucking opinion.

rsvp42:

If you're referring to the vigor bar, it's only has two notches in the beginning, hence two casts. You get a third soon after (and I assume even more later), as well as abilities that refill it faster both in and out of combat.

So far, I've only seen this happen once. It made me leave on subtitles because I have no way of knowing when it will happen again, but I wouldn't blow that issue out of proportion.

I've slotted vigor for armor, and put points in vigor for character, I've worked my way to the last point in signs. Pretty sure I've also mutated to get more in signs, but that may have been dmg or range. I've done all I could to increase vigor, but still only 2 bars lol.
Edit: @bob1052 Pointed out that I had missed the flat boosts, and was going in to regeneration.

The wind happens everytime I'm outside in part 2 with dialogue. Especially when talking to the Palpatine looking mage. I always play with subtitles because I like to run my own music in the background, I usually just want dialogue sound to stay on. It also happened in flotsam I think with the background chatter. It's as loud as the person talking for some reason. I have to turn off my own music, max out regular sound and just deal with the ridiculous wind. I havn't gotten past the part after you cross through the fog, becuase the combat freezing glitch ruined my save. I'll play again but I have to commit to losing close to 2 hours of play time.

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