The Big Picture: Going Green: Part I

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Kyle Rayner is neater I think, but I haven't read the comics, so I don't really have much of an opinion. I loved Green Arrow in the Justice League cartoon, because it was just the most ridiculous thing that he was coming out with all this politically charged stuff in the wake of a giant monster destroying a city. Maybe Hal Jordan had that going for him.

We all know that the one true Green Lantern is Guy Gardener. His name is alliterative! That's more than enough qualifications.

Also, Moviebob, you should've mentioned how the original Green Lantern is made of wood. Comedy gold.

Big GL fan here, so nothing was surprising for me.

Except HEAT. Knew nothing of that. Are they responsible for the reboot that made me give up on the series then?

I wasn't a big fan od Ron Marz's stuff. I loved what Gerald Jones was doing and was pissed they took him off it.

Exterminas:
Could someone explain to me how this buisness with the colors really works?
I mean with superman it is like "Here is Cryptonite!" "Blarg" is it the same way with the green guy and a yellow shirt?

In case no one has answered already, here: The Color yellow is the color of evil, or, rather, fear. The Green Lanterns do not acknowledge their own fear, so they literally can not use their powers on yellow things; for an example of this, go read Allstar Batman, in which Batman has Robin paint a room yellow so that the Green Lantern can't use his powers on anything in the room when he steps ito it.

Eventually, I don't remember who, but one of the GReen Lanterns (possibly the younger one Bob spoke of) came to understand fear, and conquered, well, Yellow.

Later, each emotion got a ring for it; Red is anger, yellow is Fear, etc.

Don't worry bob, the more obscure something is the more episodes i think it needs simply for sheer interest value. It's like being at comic book college.

Mstrswrd:

Exterminas:
Could someone explain to me how this buisness with the colors really works?
I mean with superman it is like "Here is Cryptonite!" "Blarg" is it the same way with the green guy and a yellow shirt?

In case no one has answered already, here: The Color yellow is the color of evil, or, rather, fear. The Green Lanterns do not acknowledge their own fear, so they literally can not use their powers on yellow things; for an example of this, go read Allstar Batman, in which Batman has Robin paint a room yellow so that the Green Lantern can't use his powers on anything in the room when he steps ito it.

Eventually, I don't remember who, but one of the GReen Lanterns (possibly the younger one Bob spoke of) came to understand fear, and conquered, well, Yellow.

Later, each emotion got a ring for it; Red is anger, yellow is Fear, etc.

What if one guy thinks it's yellow, but another person thinks it's green?

I was hoping for a recap of the story where Hal gets it on with the under-age alien girl.

Girl physically ages from 13 to 18 in the space of two pages (thank to the ring artificially aging her) and three pages later, Hal is totally hitting it, much to everyone's horror.

Hal Jordon was never really known for his sound judgments. :)

SlothfulCobra:

Mstrswrd:

Exterminas:
Could someone explain to me how this buisness with the colors really works?
I mean with superman it is like "Here is Cryptonite!" "Blarg" is it the same way with the green guy and a yellow shirt?

In case no one has answered already, here: The Color yellow is the color of evil, or, rather, fear. The Green Lanterns do not acknowledge their own fear, so they literally can not use their powers on yellow things; for an example of this, go read Allstar Batman, in which Batman has Robin paint a room yellow so that the Green Lantern can't use his powers on anything in the room when he steps ito it.

Eventually, I don't remember who, but one of the GReen Lanterns (possibly the younger one Bob spoke of) came to understand fear, and conquered, well, Yellow.

Later, each emotion got a ring for it; Red is anger, yellow is Fear, etc.

What if one guy thinks it's yellow, but another person thinks it's green?

In a story written by Larry Niven, Green Lantern defeated another GL by running away really fast and color-shifting his green beam into a yellow one.

The above explanation is the one ret-conned into the book a few years ago. Before that, it was just an arbitrary weakness with no rational explanation. One villain even got away with a (I kid you not) *invisible* yellow force field... the writer not understanding that something invisible by definition can't be yellow.

I read Green Lantern for quite a long time... and its strange how I can't point to any particularly good stories.

SlothfulCobra:

Mstrswrd:

Exterminas:
Could someone explain to me how this buisness with the colors really works?
I mean with superman it is like "Here is Cryptonite!" "Blarg" is it the same way with the green guy and a yellow shirt?

In case no one has answered already, here: The Color yellow is the color of evil, or, rather, fear. The Green Lanterns do not acknowledge their own fear, so they literally can not use their powers on yellow things; for an example of this, go read Allstar Batman, in which Batman has Robin paint a room yellow so that the Green Lantern can't use his powers on anything in the room when he steps ito it.

Eventually, I don't remember who, but one of the GReen Lanterns (possibly the younger one Bob spoke of) came to understand fear, and conquered, well, Yellow.

Later, each emotion got a ring for it; Red is anger, yellow is Fear, etc.

What if one guy thinks it's yellow, but another person thinks it's green?

Do you mean the color itself, like they have some kind of vision problem, or do you mean the personification of color as representitive of emotion? If it's the second one, then it's not up for debate in the D.C. universe; each color is bound to it's emotion in the D.C. mythos, and even if you have a conditioned fear of, say, the color Purple, and love the color yellow, the Yellow power ring is literally powered by fear; if their is fear in the universe, then the yellow power ring will exist (to the best of my understanding. Someone more well versed in DC lore can explain it better).

Bob, I checked. It's a slow movie week. Do part two of this on Friday okay? Please? I hate having to wait an entire week.

On a side note, I was one of the few who really liked Kyle Rayner, and I wished he could have been more. Having an artist be in charge of what is probably the most creative macguffin outside of the cosmic cube is a great idea. Oh well.

HankMan:
Thanks for shedding some

light

on this subject.

Okay this pun made you win the internet (laughing hard). Always getting me with your puns :)

OT: What? Robotic Superman and.. *confused* So Green Lantern ..kills- *holds my head* So confusing man. How can someone like him seriously become the ultimate super villain? I just don't see how this all works out. Least you're giving us it in pieces Bob so thanks!

Wait, how is this a bad thing? Political issues not withstanding, DC completely raped Hal Jordan's character.

Fans had a right to be angry and protest; they turned a decades old hero into a supervillain in an incredibly cheap, contrived way. Them winning should be a good thing.

i grew up on kyle way back in the Ashanti era we call the ninety's and don't get me wrong i loved him but the moment i saw Hal he became my favorite green lantern and my favorite DC superhero(well hem batman and the flash respectively)simply put hes the all american hero,one of the more powerful supers in the DC universe and the man can stand up to batman.

also Geoff Johns stuff is some of the better green lantern stuff iv seen out there, i love how he brought hal back and added to the mythos(hurts to use the ring, need to be nearby to translate,etc,etc) the sinestro corps war and blackest night were tops as well

nice wrok bob, looking forward to the next one!

Mstrswrd:
Do you mean the color itself, like they have some kind of vision problem, or do you mean the personification of color as representative of emotion?

I think they meant these cases when people can't agree what a colour is. It happens most often with blue and green as far as I know, but I've seen it happen with other colours, and green-yellow could happen too.

Like some other people here, I'm European, and I know BD much better than I do comics. I actually know mangas better too (despite the fact they used to be equated with comics, sold in the same specialty store, etc, but recently it's been different and you find mangas in regular bookstores, but not many comics).

I think ultimately it's about the object. In here our sequential art is hardcover and comes out in albums. Your comics come in smaller issues and seem to be intended to be disposable or something (not that it prevents people from collecting them). There also seem to be much more occurrences of several (or even many) artists/writers for a same series, when most of ours have just their official writer and artist (or they're both the same). To my knowledge, series that changed authors, such as Spirou and Fantasio, are pretty rare, things like that are more common when the author dies and an heir takes back the series for instance.

Another difference is that European BD has much less room for evolution/time to evolve and become that twisted and complicated, because the standard is one album (56 pages or so) per year, sometimes every other year. In the US it seems the issues are much more frequent (same thing with manga actually).

Anyways! US comic backstories always fascinate me. I didn't grow up with them so they seem so... weird. I'm sure it makes a bit more sense when you see it develop bit by bit.
I actually knew of the Green Lantern, and the basic concept. I always thought it was a lousy super-weakness. Is nobody aware of it? Because you know how in Superman every villain tries to use Kryptonite? Well if the villains in Green Lantern don't make sure to wear yellow clothes and make-up and steal gold or something, they're kind of stupid. I mean, when you can make a superhero inoffensive simply by painting stuff yellow, why not do it? It's much simpler than trying to put your hands on some kryptonite (although this thing is surprisingly easier to come across than you'd think).

I can't wait for part 2. It all fascinates me in the same way mythologies do.

Mstrswrd:

SlothfulCobra:

Mstrswrd:

In case no one has answered already, here: The Color yellow is the color of evil, or, rather, fear. The Green Lanterns do not acknowledge their own fear, so they literally can not use their powers on yellow things; for an example of this, go read Allstar Batman, in which Batman has Robin paint a room yellow so that the Green Lantern can't use his powers on anything in the room when he steps ito it.

Eventually, I don't remember who, but one of the GReen Lanterns (possibly the younger one Bob spoke of) came to understand fear, and conquered, well, Yellow.

Later, each emotion got a ring for it; Red is anger, yellow is Fear, etc.

What if one guy thinks it's yellow, but another person thinks it's green?

Do you mean the color itself, like they have some kind of vision problem, or do you mean the personification of color as representitive of emotion? If it's the second one, then it's not up for debate in the D.C. universe; each color is bound to it's emotion in the D.C. mythos, and even if you have a conditioned fear of, say, the color Purple, and love the color yellow, the Yellow power ring is literally powered by fear; if their is fear in the universe, then the yellow power ring will exist (to the best of my understanding. Someone more well versed in DC lore can explain it better).

you explined it pretty well acttuly but allow me to put a finer point on it if i may

In DC Comics, the Emotional Spectrum is divided into the seven colors of the rainbow, with each color corresponding to a different emotion: rage (red), avarice (orange), fear (yellow), willpower (green), hope (blue), compassion (indigo), and love (violet). At San Diego Comic Con 2009, Geoff Johns described his own vision of the emotional spectrum; an aspect of the DC Universe he began to shape more actively during the preliminary stages of the Blackest Night plotline. He explains that the idea is something he sees as being real, and a product of the complexity of human emotions (as well as those of other sentient, fictional beings within the comics he writes). The two emotions on the far ends of the emotional spectrum (rage and love), have a much stronger influence over their users. Johns explains that rage is an emotion that's closely related to the primal instincts one needs in order to survive. In instances of fight-or-flight response, rage would embody "fight." Johns elaborates that love is the most pure emotion, but also "powerful and just as distorting as rage." Though these emotions are overwhelming, they are not negative if used correctly. While describing interaction between the different emotions, Johns describes willpower (the emotion central to the spectrum) as being the ability to maintain control over one's emotions and grow as an individual. Hope embodies a spiritual quality that emerges from that awareness, and compassion (according to Johns) is an even more difficult emotion to explain that is more rare in today's society.

Although originally only the Green Lanterns and Sinestro utilized the spectrum, the formation of Corps around other colors of the spectrum is explored in the "Sinestro Corps War" and Blackest Night storylines.

Red Lantern Corps: With their origin introduced amongst plot elements revolving around the Five Inversions, this Corps draws their power from rage. Making their debut appearance during the one-shot Final Crisis: Rage of the Red Lanterns, they are founded by the first Red Lantern: Atrocitus.Described as "monsters" by Johns, most Red Lanterns are depicted as irrational and animalistic.

Agent Orange: Powered by avarice, the sole bearer of the orange light is a character named Larfleeze (referred to as "Agent Orange" by the Guardians); a creation that Johns has previously described as being one of his favorites.Prominently featured during a multi-issue story arc also titled "Agent Orange," it is revealed that he has the ability to steal the identities of those he's killed and is able to transform them into orange light constructs which comprise his Orange Lantern Corps.

Sinestro Corps: Story elements from Green Lantern: Rebirth and The Sinestro Corps War expand upon Sinestro's yellow power ring into a prototype for a larger group. The color yellow is established to be powered by fear, as a natural counterpart to Green Lanterns' ability to overcome fear.

Green Lantern Corps: An intergalactic police force founded and led by the Guardians of the Universe, their members draw upon willpower to generate constructs made of green energy from their power rings.

Blue Lantern Corps: The first blue ring is created by Ganthet and Sayd at the conclusion of "The Sinestro Corps War" plotline, where it is noted that the emotion of hope is the color's source of power. Blue Lanterns are only capable of the basic abilities of flight and aura generation on their own. It is only in the presence of an active Green Lantern that the full extent of their abilities is realized, as hope is nothing without the willpower to enact it.

Indigo Tribe: Johns was very secretive in revealing plot elements surrounding the Indigo Tribe in Green Lantern, which corresponds to the indigo light of compassion being especially elusive in the DC Universe. Making their first extended appearance in Blackest Night: Tales of the Corps #1, they display the ability to teleport and reproduce the abilities of other Corps.

Star Sapphires: The Star Sapphires are a Corps based around the Green Lantern villainess of the same name. The next Corps introduced after the Sinestro Corps, the "Mystery of the Star Sapphire" story-arc depicts the Zamarons creating power rings and batteries powered by love (a long running theme with the Star Sapphire character).

MovieBob:
Going Green: Part I

With only two weeks left until the movie, MovieBob sheds (mostly green) light on The Green Lantern.

Watch Video

But can you tell me that there isn't some scent of agenda when, in the mid-90's "get us out of the Gulf {Part 1)" uproar, they cast aside the military guy for a graphic artist? Not a cop, not even a security guard. Not someone who you'd look at and say, "Yes, this is a person with a calling to defend justice or whatever."

It's either a comic book writer writing his idealized self into a comic, or it's meant as some kind of statement. What that statement was, I couldn't say. But when you do something that off the wall and don't explain your rationale, don't be surprised when people fill in that gaping, obvious blank.

Don't misunderstand me. I'm not a conservative, I'm not a conspiracy-monger. But sometimes, we can allow ourselves to become the polar opposite and reject any notion that someone somewhere has an agenda or an ulterior motive. If there's a FOX News, then somewhere there's the anti-FOX. Newton's third law, man.

Cheap, Bob. Really cheap. I wanted to know more, and this whole episode you just teased. The hell, man?

does anyone knows anywhere where i can read emerald twilight? (and if possible zero hour) cause im a big fan of GL (as you can see...) and this is one event that is always mantioned and i realy would like to actualy read it...
also for everyone not familliar with the redicioless (yet awsome) story of GL if you think emerald twilight was wierd wait... when he gets close to the blackest night part thats when it all goes nuts (7 corpses nother less in all the colours of the freaking rainbow! plus a wierd explanation to the "yellow" issue...)

SlothfulCobra:
Kyle Rayner is neater I think, but I haven't read the comics, so I don't really have much of an opinion. I loved Green Arrow in the Justice League cartoon, because it was just the most ridiculous thing that he was coming out with all this politically charged stuff in the wake of a giant monster destroying a city. Maybe Hal Jordan had that going for him.

We all know that the one true Green Lantern is Guy Gardener. His name is alliterative! That's more than enough qualifications.

Also, Moviebob, you should've mentioned how the original Green Lantern is made of wood. Comedy gold.

You're talking about Alan Scot as the original Green Lantern. He's not made of wood, but it is his one weakness. He cannot use his powers to alter wood, and anything made of wood will move right through his constructs. In one comic he was killed by a bomb wrapped in a wooden crate. One of his villains is actually a tree man.

At this point Alan Scot is no longer actually a living being, but has bonded so tightly with his ring that he is a construct held together by his own force of will, and he doesn't know it. The only people who know this are Mister Terrific and Doctor Midnite. In an issue they mentioned the only reason the doctor could draw blood was because he used a wooden tongue depressor to make Alan think he was human. Alan Scot is also the only Green Lantern that is not a member of the Green Lantern Corps.

In case anyone was wondering, the sector is official 2814, each member of the corps is assigned a decimal code after the number to signify how much trouble is in the area. Most sectors have one green lantern, earth has four.

vxicepickxv:

In case anyone was wondering, the sector is official 2814, each member of the corps is assigned a decimal code after the number to signify how much trouble is in the area. Most sectors have one green lantern, earth has four.

for who is wondering why do we have four the reason is aperatly earth is the center of the multiverse (not the universe wich is for some reason centered in oa the GLC headquoters) wich means if earth is destroyed the multiverse (all 52 universes in exitance) will also colapse... (if im not mistaken that almost happened in crysis...)

idodo35:
does anyone knows anywhere where i can read emerald twilight? (and if possible zero hour) cause im a big fan of GL (as you can see...) and this is one event that is always mantioned and i realy would like to actualy read it...
also for everyone not familliar with the redicioless (yet awsome) story of GL if you think emerald twilight was wierd wait... when he gets close to the blackest night part thats when it all goes nuts (7 corpses nother less in all the colours of the freaking rainbow! plus a wierd explanation to the "yellow" issue...)

Between the two of them, it's going to be about 40 bucks on amazon.

I'm not really a big fan of any of the GL Corps, but I don't have any problems with Alan Scot or Jade. I guess I'm not cut out for too many space stories. That was the part of 52 I enjoyed the least(Don't bother reading it for any of the major DC superheroes, as most of them are MIA).

I don't know which is scarier, the fact that fanboys got together to form a huge organization to protest fictional events, or that they won.

On a side note doesn't say much for the Green Lantern Corps. when they could easily be defeated by Rainbow Brite.

idodo35:

vxicepickxv:

In case anyone was wondering, the sector is official 2814, each member of the corps is assigned a decimal code after the number to signify how much trouble is in the area. Most sectors have one green lantern, earth has four.

for who is wondering why do we have four the reason is aperatly earth is the center of the multiverse (not the universe wich is for some reason centered in oa the GLC headquoters) wich means if earth is destroyed the multiverse (all 52 universes in exitance) will also colapse... (if im not mistaken that almost happened in crysis...)

Depending on which one you read, will depend on your answer. I know Crisis on Infinite Earths(back in the 80's) was actually designed to remove the multiverse by destroying all of the other universes. Infinite Crisis brought some(?) of them back, and destroyed others.

It's all pretty damn confusing, especially when they brought back super villains from one universe, but didn't give it the same universe number as the first time. Earth 2 was at first home of the Justice Society of America, and Earth 3 was the Crime Syndicate of America. After Crisis on Infinite Earths, the rest of the universes were supposed to be destroyed, everything wrapped up in a tidy package, and never to be spoken of again. Somebody said screw that and opened the door to Earth 2, home of the Crime Syndicate of America.

Of course Power Girl, Psycho Pirate, and a few others decided they didn't want to not exist, so they existed. It's all kind of a reason why I pretty much just said, screw it, it's time to read Y, the last man.

HankMan:

klasbo:

HankMan:
Thanks for shedding some

light

on this subject.

I was hoping you'd do something with limelight, limes being green and all...
Come on, you can do this!

Why would I want to make a joke about limelight?
MovieBob made it quite clear that the Green Lantern is no fruit!

I... I have nothing worthwhile.
The fruit in question must have been a banana. Its yellowness has defeated me.

Also, my captcha:
image

Dastardly:

MovieBob:
Going Green: Part I

With only two weeks left until the movie, MovieBob sheds (mostly green) light on The Green Lantern.

Watch Video

But can you tell me that there isn't some scent of agenda when, in the mid-90's "get us out of the Gulf {Part 1)" uproar, they cast aside the military guy for a graphic artist? Not a cop, not even a security guard. Not someone who you'd look at and say, "Yes, this is a person with a calling to defend justice or whatever."

It's either a comic book writer writing his idealized self into a comic, or it's meant as some kind of statement. What that statement was, I couldn't say. But when you do something that off the wall and don't explain your rationale, don't be surprised when people fill in that gaping, obvious blank.

Don't misunderstand me. I'm not a conservative, I'm not a conspiracy-monger. But sometimes, we can allow ourselves to become the polar opposite and reject any notion that someone somewhere has an agenda or an ulterior motive. If there's a FOX News, then somewhere there's the anti-FOX. Newton's third law, man.

I think the idea was more to give the ring to someone with a strong sense of creativity, hence, an artist. Kyle was known for creating mechs, dragons, even supermodels for constructs while Hal was more known more for simple tools (hammers, boxing gloves) or formless energy fields.

Given this was all on the heels of killing Superman and breaking Batman's back, I'm amazed anyone thought there was much political behind it. Just the lastest in big DC marketing schemes...er...events.

canadamus_prime:
I don't know which is scarier, the fact that fanboys got together to form a huge organization to protest fictional events, or that they won.

On a side note doesn't say much for the Green Lantern Corps. when they could easily be defeated by Rainbow Brite.

They damn near got killed by Superboy Prime, and he barely has any yellow on him.

Not only WAS I pissed about the Emerald Twilight, I AM STILL PISSED.

One of my favorite aspects of Hal's character was that he was more or less the only "human" superhero in the DC universe. Most of the characters are near-invulnerable ubermensch or aliens with exotic features and abilities. Some exceptions include Batman and Green Arrow but their portrayal also tends to be a bit one-dimensional; Batman's primary motivation consistently being his thirst for justice and yadda yadda parents killed, and Green Arrow, as Bob noted in this episode, is the poster child for Seattle-brand liberalism.

Unlike the superpowered individuals around him, Hal was a mere human and the ring was the source of power. That tended to make him more aware that there are consequences to utilizing power, sometimes unintended ones. Granted I may be taking a little bit of this from his "walk da earth" period of self-discovery but I just have a memory of him being singular in viewing his powers at times as a curse rather than a blessing and/or de facto license to punch bad guys.

It was thus that his meltdown and metamorphosis into Parallax was completely non-sensical to me; it was far out of character for Hal, and it dehumanized the most human superhero in the lexicon.

When they made him Spectre, I thought at least that was something. But ironically, the one thing that pissed me off more than the way they wrote Hal off was... the thing that happens in Bob's part two. On a related note, I never understood the geek-love for Geoff Johns; I haven't found his mega-stories to be particularly awesome. Mark Waid's work on The Flash was one of the few bright spots of the 90s.

:edit: And also, Kyle Rayner's a punk.

Cyborg evil Superman?!
Man, I love when Bob goes all comic, its like super-complex math made easy by the awesome teacher.
I love you Bob.

So, since I loved JLU, for those of you that know things: whence came John Stewart? I dug him as GL.

On a side note, I think it speaks well for Hal Jordan that over the years, he was/will be portrayed by Angel, The Prince of Persia, Spider Man, Deadpool, Doc Holliday, Captain Reynolds AND Jayne, the Dragon's Lair narrator, Kevin Smith and that guy from Law and Order SVU.

:edit: re John Stewart, Guy Gardner was originally supposed to be the "backup" for Hal or something, but he got hurt and the Guardians selected Stewart.

He was a stand-in from time to time, but most notably, he took the job when Hal left the corps in the 80s to be with Carol.

Ugh could we please just pretend the movie isn't coming out? There are plenty of good comic book heroes but considering any iteration of the Green Lantern can be defeated by a #2 Pencil...

Hollywood needs to know where to stop.

Great show Bob, I think your making the Green lantern story more simple than it really is but you only have a limited amount of time after all.

And before the internets we had this thing called pen and paper. Another thing called a telly-o-phone. And people would talk. So people could work together ya know. But now its just so much better, :P

Fanboys got so butthurt they formed an organization to protest the change. Why does that not surprise me?

Really, it doesn't. If the whole Parallax thing happened today, then I bet DC would find their website hacked.

Fanboys are idiots, and calling their objections towards something as "pissing and moaning" is the correct thing to do.

I hate to bring this up in comments section of video about comics, but if you want grade A examples of fanboy pissing and moaning then all you need to do is go to the WoW forums during the beta of a new expansion.

Blizzard introduces new lore or progresses current lore, and the fanboys nerd-rage.

So it's no surprise that comic fanboys do it too, and take it to a whole new level.

I've been reading through the green lantern comics for over a year now, starting at the beginning and working my way up. I am currently at the begging of Brightest Day, I have also read the entirety of Zero Hour. That does not make me an expert but it does give me an different perspective. I've noticed a lot of moral messages are imposed on the reader not only in Green Lantern comics but almost all comics. Many of these moral messages are political as well. I enjoy this because by reading multiple comic titles I'm exposed to different ideals and can better understand others points of view. That being said, I understand that DC wasn't trying to be "Politically Correct" or "Anti-Military" or "Feminizing the Culture" when they turned Hal into Parallax but that doesn't mean that there is no political undertone or message there. I get that many of the people who made the arguments toward it being "politically correct" can be seen as "bigots" but it's understandable that a character who is perceived as more of a conservative is turned evil and replaced by a young artist can strike a chord with people who are fans of Green Lantern and read deeply into the underlying messages of comics to get upset with the message that is sent through this event.

Now I get this show is solely Movie Bob's opinion, but I think that it's wrong for the people who disagreed with political implications of the transformation to be completely written off.

That being said I enjoyed the transformation story and the revival story but I disliked how long it took for Hal to come back.

It's not confusing at all, Bob just left out a LOT of stuff (hope he covers that in part 2) also the fan boys who were like "boooooo Kyle Rayner" and other stuff are dumb asses, Hal turning evil was SO awesome!! Kyle Rayner is also very kick ass as well.

Well atleast now I know I won't have to bother watching the next episode... I mean seriously I'm starting to find this show pretty misleading, I thought it was supposed to be about games, movies, current events (and maybe a little bit about comics) but at this point they might aswell rename it to the comic blog or some shit like that. I'm not just whining because I'm not in any way, shape or form interested in comics but I really don't think this kind of show is fitting for the escapist.

Last episode I will ever see :(

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