Mystery Case Files: The Malgrave Incident Review

There's such a thing as "hidden object"-fans? I've never met one D:

Anyway, it seems troubling enough to use the Wiimote for that alone, considering how hard it can be to aim at it sometimes (at the very least for me, anyway).

EternalFacepalm:
There's such a thing as "hidden object"-fans? I've never met one D:

Anyway, it seems troubling enough to use the Wiimote for that alone, considering how hard it can be to aim at it sometimes (at the very least for me, anyway).

They sell fairly well, so there must be some.

I think the most attractive thing about these games (and that also sort of applies to adventure games) is that they're easy to get into. No need for twitch reflexes or hard controls, although apparently the maze section violates that. It's easy for anyone to get into, which means a wide audience, even if they wouldn't consider themselves "gamers".

It's all about knowing your audience.

I've always wondered why the Point and Click genre never exploded on the Wii. I'm sure there are a few obscure titles, but the hardware seems perfect for it, as does the demographic.

And I'm talking about ACTUAL story-based point and click games btw, like Monkey Island, not "hidden object" games. No offense to Big Fish, though. I played one of the old MCFs on the PC and quite liked it. Glad to see they're branching out.

I think hidden object games are a genre (?) where being inventive and engaging is actually quite hard to do. It depends how willing the creators are to build the right architecture around it - I mean, (to make a tangential comparison) if it weren't for the story, the angaging characters and the aesthetic, Professor Layton would basically just be a collection of mensa puzzles, suitable only for those who really like mensa puzles.

I personally like to play hidden object games on flights. But even then, only if they have a nice story with them.

EternalFacepalm:
There's such a thing as "hidden object"-fans? I've never met one D:

Anyway, it seems troubling enough to use the Wiimote for that alone, considering how hard it can be to aim at it sometimes (at the very least for me, anyway).

There's a fair number of HOG fans on The Escapist staff, actually. :) And hidden object games are huge in casual gaming. You know how it seems like every other hardcore game is a shooter? Every other casual game is a HOG.

justnotcricket:
I think hidden object games are a genre (?) where being inventive and engaging is actually quite hard to do. It depends how willing the creators are to build the right architecture around it - I mean, (to make a tangential comparison) if it weren't for the story, the angaging characters and the aesthetic, Professor Layton would basically just be a collection of mensa puzzles, suitable only for those who really like mensa puzles.

I personally like to play hidden object games on flights. But even then, only if they have a nice story with them.

I agree. There are a number of HOGs that are just straight-up searchfests, but I don't enjoy those nearly as much as those with narratives. The Mystery Case Files series has some of the best HOGs out there - I just finished The 13th Skull recently, brilliant game.

I wonder if the MCF crew will ever release another game as huge as Ravenhurst or Return to Ravenhurst. Those two are HOGs that I routinely send people to learn about atmosphere so thick you could lose your momma in it.

I'm surprised that they missed the twitchy controls during QC with the Malgrave Incident. They're usually spot on with their quality so I wonder what sort of pressure they were under to get this one out the door.

I really, really wish they would release more of their games for the DS. The stylus interface was perfect.

HydraMoon:
I wonder if the MCF crew will ever release another game as huge as Ravenhurst or Return to Ravenhurst. Those two are HOGs that I routinely send people to learn about atmosphere so thick you could lose your momma in it.

I'm surprised that they missed the twitchy controls during QC with the Malgrave Incident. They're usually spot on with their quality so I wonder what sort of pressure they were under to get this one out the door.

I really, really wish they would release more of their games for the DS. The stylus interface was perfect.

Agreed, but cramming in the visuals is a bit tricky. You're left with the choice of making the HOG sequences super itty bitty, or scrolling. Neither solution is ideal.

Susan Arendt:

Agreed, but cramming in the visuals is a bit tricky. You're left with the choice of making the HOG sequences super itty bitty, or scrolling. Neither solution is ideal.

Oddly enough the zoom box on MCF Prime Suspects on the DS didn't bother me as much as the inability to click multiple items. It's only, at most, half a second of waiting time but add that up over the entirety of the game and I was ready to rip out my hair by the end of it.

nice to see this review here; this game seems to be well made and polished, i might pick it up if I get the chance

 

Reply to Thread

Log in or Register to Comment
Have an account? Login below:
With Facebook:Login With Facebook
or
Username:  
Password:  
  
Not registered? To sign up for an account with The Escapist:
Register With Facebook
Register With Facebook
or
Register for a free account here