Name Game: Podi Puss Plural

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I'm going to trust Merriam-Webster on this one.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wFyY2mK8pxk

If i remember correctly, Octopi is incorrect, octopuses is acceptable, but the correct plural is octopodes. God, I love knowing that and annoying people with it.

Always a great comic.

....

OCTOPI!

In today's episode of NameGame: Grammar Police, I would like to inject one little comment:

Cool strip.

Wow. I always thought I was being smart when I said "octopi".

Now I know how to say it properly, and I can tell people why it's right. Thanks

TheDoctor455:
Umm... actually...
Octopi and Octopuses are both valid.

It just depends on which you prefer
or maybe the context (not sure what context would rule out one or the other).

Trust me, I'm an English major... and an aspiring novelist/poet/videogame writer.

This.

Both forms are valid.

Off the top of my head, the only word that sounds weird with "-i" is "platypi", since I'm not sure of the origin of the word.

But "uses" and "i" is correct in this case. Sorry you are misinformed and adamant about your ignorance :/

Why don't you just shoot the protesters? It'd be far more fun and satisfying to see them get massacred.

Octopus is a word of Latin origin. Not Greek. Therefore the correct plural form is OCTOPUSES. Not Octopi.

Octopus comes from the Greek word, but yes it is Latin, you are right about that. Actually that is the precise reason why it is "octopi" in plural. That's how Latin works. Second declension plural nominative, to be precise, ending is "-i".
Even if it were Greek the plural form would be "octopodes"; under no circumstances besides English corruption of the form would it be "octopuses".

Abedeus:

TheDoctor455:
Umm... actually...
Octopi and Octopuses are both valid.

It just depends on which you prefer
or maybe the context (not sure what context would rule out one or the other).

Trust me, I'm an English major... and an aspiring novelist/poet/videogame writer.

This.

Both forms are valid.

Off the top of my head, the only word that sounds weird with "-i" is "platypi", since I'm not sure of the origin of the word.

But "uses" and "i" is correct in this case. Sorry you are misinformed and adamant about your ignorance :/

Platypus is of Greek origin. In Greek the plural would be "platypodes", but the ending also works with Latin declension, which would pluralize it as "platypi"

You tell 'em, Leels. Take them down! Change the world!

If it was legal, I would "drink for 4 days straight" too. It turns out that the test that I thought I did very well in slammed me with a C, so I can kiss my hopes for honor roll goodbye at this rate.
My college had a Friday off last week, not this one.

"Octopi" is my exception to descriptivism... Yes, normally, whatever words people normally use, and whatever words people will understand easiest without risk of confusion are by definition the "correct" words. Except "octopi", it doesn't count.

But more seriously:
"Octopodes" is the etymologically-correct plural, as that's how it was pluralised in both Greek and Latin ("ὀκτώποδες" and "octopodēs", respectively), but it's hard to call it "correct" in English if people don't know what you're talking about when you say it. Best saved for responding to people who try to smugly correct people by claiming that "octopi" is etymologically-correct. Also, be sure you pronounce it correctly - before watching that Merriam-Webster clip that I see has already been linked to aways up the thread, I had been pronouncing it wrong for years.
"Octopi" is a hypercorrection, but strictly-speaking acceptable from a descriptivist standpoint, in that people will know what you mean when you say it, but if you try to claim it's more correct than "octopuses", or that it was "octopi" in Latin, then you're entirely wrong.
"Octopuses" is entirely fine, as it's the standard English way of pluralising words.

Stupid people. No one can get their spelling right.

It's *obviously* "Octopussen". God.

Language changes constantly. The greek origins might mean it should be octopuses, but we aren't speaking Greek, we are speaking English, which is a mix mash of all sorts of earlier languages anyway.

So words change their means, or the spelling is changed, and as such octopi is completely fine.

I mixed up my origins. I meant to say Greek not Latin. My bad.

Can we give Podi a rest please? I really like this comic a lot and the gag is losing it's charm. Sorry.

So where does this leave:

Cactus
Colossus
...and
Genius

I'm not a native english speaker so i'm actually looking for a serious answer to this one.

Hem. Octopus; the appropriate Latin plural nominative clause is octopi. Look up the o-declension's clauses. Here's a link to a German Wiki, but the table should be self-explanatory enough.

http://www.lateinwiki.org/o-Deklination

So unless octopus is actually somehow part of the u-declension like the word virus (in which case the plural would simply also be octopus), octopi is perfectly correct.

http://www.lateinwiki.org/u-Deklination

The Greek origin of the word doesn't really matter when octopus is considered the Latinized version, so Latin declension rules would apply. It's like the screwy medical Latin we use where lots of words of Greek origin are included.

It's a similar thing with the humble cactus. Its plural is actually cactus plants.

Ulquiorra4sama:
So where does this leave:

Cactus
Colossus
...and
Genius

I'm not a native english speaker so i'm actually looking for a serious answer to this one.

Genius is definitely geniuses, but I'm not sure about colossus.

Zaverexus:

Octopus is a word of Latin origin. Not Greek. Therefore the correct plural form is OCTOPUSES. Not Octopi.

Octopus comes from the Greek word, but yes it is Latin, you are right about that. Actually that is the precise reason why it is "octopi" in plural. That's how Latin works. Second declension plural nominative, to be precise, ending is "-i".
Even if it were Greek the plural form would be "octopodes"; under no circumstances besides English corruption of the form would it be "octopuses".

If it were Latin it would be third declension (octopes) and thus octopedes in plural.

Hmmmm. Found that a little self indulgent, but it's a fair point.

It's also not a very commonly used word so I think a little lattitude wouldn't go astray.
Not everyone can know as much about the plural forms as you do, and that's reasonable.

Surprisingly, Wikipedia actually backs up your case.

Drink for four days straight? Ooh, I wanna join in on that fun.

I'm forced to wonder if this is canon or not.

Language evolves over time. Words and grammar that are 'correct' today were most likely considered incorrect many years ago, but the language has since changed to accommodate this. In the same regard, while 'octopuses' is etymologically correct, the -i plural for words ending in -us is more elegant and rolls off the tongue a whole lot easier than the mouthful that is octopuses. Therefore, although 'octopuses' is the correct form, I support the -i ending for -us plurals being standardised.

mgirl:
If i remember correctly, Octopi is incorrect, octopuses is acceptable, but the correct plural is octopodes. God, I love knowing that and annoying people with it.

Well, all three are acceptable and correct...

bakan:

mgirl:
If i remember correctly, Octopi is incorrect, octopuses is acceptable, but the correct plural is octopodes. God, I love knowing that and annoying people with it.

Well, all three are acceptable and correct...

Alright, I'll be more specific. Octopi is acceptable in language, but technically the incorrect plural that came about due to overgeneralising of a specific language rule. Octopuses is the one that is seen as 'standard', therefore more acceptable, and octopodes is often viewed as 'correct' in terms of its root language.

Is that Jared from Manly Guys?

Daystar Clarion:
It's true.

QI told me so.

And Stephen Fry never lies.

Well the other accepted form is octo-po-die, I have no idea how I am meant to spell it correctly, just phonetically.

That was also on QI.

Lukeje:

Zaverexus:

Octopus is a word of Latin origin. Not Greek. Therefore the correct plural form is OCTOPUSES. Not Octopi.

Octopus comes from the Greek word, but yes it is Latin, you are right about that. Actually that is the precise reason why it is "octopi" in plural. That's how Latin works. Second declension plural nominative, to be precise, ending is "-i".
Even if it were Greek the plural form would be "octopodes"; under no circumstances besides English corruption of the form would it be "octopuses".

If it were Latin it would be third declension (octopes) and thus octopedes in plural.

It would be if it were a foreign word that did not fit another declension, but seeing as it already ends "-us", it would just become second declension masculine.

People who edit dictionaries will tell you that there are multiple correct pluralizations, and that they're tired of being asked that question by neurotic people who insist only one could possibly be correct.

In fact I won't just state this and leave it on it's own merit. Here is a video by Merriam Webster dictionary editor Kory Stamper reminding you to loosen up and stop harassing others with misguided pedantry. http://youtu.be/wFyY2mK8pxk

Language is not a fixed subject where every question can have only one answer which never changes. If you view language that way, you cannot possibly be more incorrect. Speakers, not linguists, determine what is "correct" in a language. Linguists simply study this and then seek to wield education to keep this consistent and compatible across regions. They do not address the public from on high and dictate their own language to them.

Florion:

(second-year linguistics specialist, bitch :D)
EDIT: bitch not being directed at the author or anyone in particular, just added for effect 'cause I'm proud...

Best effect.

I sometimes just like to add it in for flavor.

"Hey, can you pass my the milk? Bitch."

"Yo, you up for a game of Magic? Bitch."

Also, the way you say "Bitch" has to be very precise, no matter the context, it always sounds the same. You pause for a moment, hard B... medium ch? Also, you have to swivel your head a little when you say it.

On a side note...

image

Is the Escapist giving me his/her/its number? Should I be flattered?

Ulquiorra4sama:
So where does this leave:

Cactus
Colossus
...and
Genius

I'm not a native english speaker so i'm actually looking for a serious answer to this one.

Colossus is latin... So it would be "Colossi", but I can't seem to work it into a sentence without it sounding weird. Anything "Colossi" describes, just seems better described with "colossal"

"There are many colossi tree"

"There are many colossal trees"

Eh... I suppose it all depends on what you want to pluralize. Grammatically both are correct (I think, but I suck at English, so I might be wrong) but the latter simply SOUNDS right.

Octopuses...yeah that's more fun to say anyway

I think that if you look up "pseudo-intellectualism", this panelset, with the accompanying explanation, would be next to it.

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