Extra Punctuation: What Kinect Can Do

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What Kinect Can Do

Kinect doesn't work if you try to replace the whole controller.

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Yeah, and it was alot more sh*t than the reveal thing made it out to be, with the Milo and kate thing, which looked amazing but was Molyneux bull, probably why they got him to do it actually

What surprised me most about this article was that Yahtzee played Endless Ocean. I thought he wouldn't be interested in a scuba-diving simulator for the Wii (though it and its sequel, Blue World, are quite enjoyable).

Personally I think it should be for short games that are simple and fun to play, that's all. That's why I liked Fruit Ninja Kinect. It's fun, and you can play every now and then and still keep coming back for more.

Games don't need a controller, but many of the games they're trying to release do.

So, more non-games like flOw or Flower? Sure, make those, just don't expect me to buy them. I nearly bored myself to death with how uninteresting flOw was.

I don't have the 360th Box of X, but is there anyone out there who's curious about the new Steel Battalion: Heavy Armor title using the Kinect for secondary controls? It looks rather nifty.

I think the idea of integrating pad and Kinect play into the same experience is pretty cool... I'd totally be interested in an Okami like experience where you have standard pad game play, then various mechanics using the motion controls.

But then again, if I was going to spend 100 notes on something, it would probably be a bitchin arcade stick for fighters.

Motion controls weren't fun when the Power Glove was released. Advancing the technology has proven that it was never meant to be fun. Can we all get over the gimmicky crap and stick to making mainstream titles better?

And "apropos." Way to use that Word of the Day Calander, Yahtzee. Have you ever spoken that word aloud in an appropriate sentence? If not, let's hope tomorrow's word is "pretentious."

Normally I could care less about this stuff, but I was amused when I discovered the "trick" so I figured I'd let it out:

The title for "AaaaaAAaaaAAAaaAAAAaAAAAA!!!" is fairly simple to remember if you think of it as a pattern of five A's, with an increasing number of capitals, starting with one. After it's all caps, you're done!

SnakeoilSage:
And "apropos." Way to use that Word of the Day Calander, Yahtzee. Have you ever spoken that word aloud in an appropriate sentence? If not, let's hope tomorrow's word is "pretentious."

Really? I was always of the impression that the phrase "apropos of nothing" was a pretty common one. I know I've used it and heard it used many a time. Never felt like it was even all that uncommon, and I definitely don't consider myself a sesquipedalian (which, as a google search easily found, is a word used to describe someone who uses large words). Case in point, I had to look that up :P

That is why I think the voice command in Mass Effect 3 is a feature that might work with Kinect. You don't need to take your fingers out of the controller, and having to shout commands is more natural and immersive than a button combination (which, in turn, takes you out of the action).

Kinect should augment the controller not replace it, I've been saying this since I first saw it in action, Mass Effect has the right idea.

I don't see how a game focusing on spell casting couldn't work. It would have to focus on cerebral challenge instead of reflex or speed though. And mistakes shouldn't put you back too much, if the Kinect really makes mistakes even when moving slowly.

I've also heard "apropos of nothing" said out loud. I think is was in a movie but I didn't think then or now that it was pretentious. Just one of those phrases that exist. Is calling people pretentious for using uncommon words one of those online hipster things?

Personally, I think the Kinect would have been a lot better if it had split the controller into two halves that it always knows the position and orientation of, much like the Wii-remote

SnakeoilSage:
And "apropos." Way to use that Word of the Day Calander, Yahtzee. Have you ever spoken that word aloud in an appropriate sentence? If not, let's hope tomorrow's word is "pretentious."

The man's a professional writer. Of course he's going to have a vocabulary. He could probably even tell you the word's etymology (he studied Latin, after all).

And yes, it is entirely apropos to use 'apropos' in everyday conversation. (And if you're a new EMACS user, you're using it a lot :-).)

coldfrog:
Normally I could care less about this stuff, but I was amused when I discovered the "trick" so I figured I'd let it out:

The title for "AaaaaAAaaaAAAaaAAAAaAAAAA!!!" is fairly simple to remember if you think of it as a pattern of five A's, with an increasing number of capitals, starting with one. After it's all caps, you're done!

As we say here at work: +1

Nothing at all for the xbox, but for minecraft, it can do this: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x2mCDkqXki0

I wanted a Wii just to play Endless Ocean... Then I finally got Endless Ocean (I refused to play damn near full price for a used game) but the Wii had been shelfed and collecting dust by that point... So... I've yet to actually play it...

You should take a look at Steel Battalion 2. It'll be a gamer game with real controls, using the kinect for extraneous not-so-essential interactions with the mech cockpit. I actually thought it was exactly what you were talking about when you made that suggestion in your video, but it seems you haven't heard of it.

Ok, I understand that he wants a controller that also utilizes motion controls. So, what about Move? Sure, you're not using parts of your body to manipulate the game, but when I played Heavy Rain with Move enabled, I was able to sit and relax on the couch while both knowing I had a controller in my hands and being immersed in the game. The motion feedback was near perfect as well.

the only thing i can think of when the kinect or other motion controllers would be useful if you would use it to trigger relatively minor task.

for example arx fatalis. in order to cast a spell you had to draw with your mouse a rune.
this mechanic would perfectly fit into the kinect.

or when playing another random s.w.a.t. or other squad based shooters you could use the kinect to give your team orders trough signs. (even if your teammates will still remain braindead bullet magnets, protecting you)

or even the heavy 'press left to sit on the toilet and up to squeeze' cutscene infested heavy rain.

if you rely every movement on the kinect the consumer either will be overwhelmed and confuse the movement for flashlight with toss a grenade or he will have to endure even shittier dumbed down games.

ewhac:
The man's a professional writer. Of course he's going to have a vocabulary. He could probably even tell you the word's etymology (he studied Latin, after all).

And yes, it is entirely apropos to use 'apropos' in everyday conversation. (And if you're a new EMACS user, you're using it a lot :-).)

Having a vocabulary means you'll never have to use words like "apropos." Any professional writer will tell you this out of hand.

Apropos comes from French, not Latin. The "s" is silent.

It isn't "apropos" to use apropos in everyday conversation, it's acceptible to use apropos in everyday conversation. If it were apropos, it would be appropriate, which is a different thing entirely.

Finally, if you're an EMACS user, you've lost all right to debate the English language. Any high school English teacher would fly into a spittle-flecked rage if they discovered a piece of work edited in such a fashion, and that, in fact, would be very apropos.

So you've brought up four possible scenarios. Yahtzee is:

1) being a snob,
2) taking the piss out of snobs who think words like "apropos" are esoteric,
3) using EMACS, destroying any crediblity he once had, or
4) using a word he actually uses in everyday conversation.

I'm ruling Number 4 out on the grounds that after four years, this is the first time I've ever seen him use it in a professional article, and he isn't even speaking it.

Dear Yahtzee (he said, as if he ever reads these comment fora):

I wonder if you've taken the time to glance at some of the things people are doing with the Kinect that do not involve the Xbox.

coldfrog:
Normally I could care less about this stuff, but I was amused when I discovered the "trick" so I figured I'd let it out:

The title for "AaaaaAAaaaAAAaaAAAAaAAAAA!!!" is fairly simple to remember if you think of it as a pattern of five A's, with an increasing number of capitals, starting with one. After it's all caps, you're done!

To be fair, that's still not the full title., which is of course "AaaaaAAaaaAAAaaAAAAaAAAAA!!! - A Reckless Disregard for Gravity"
At least it isn't as socially an awkward game to mention as "1... 2... 3... KICK IT! (Drop That Beat Like an Ugly Baby)"

SnakeoilSage:
The word's etymology is French, not Latin.

...Which is a Romance language, which means its roots are in Latin.

Finally, if you're an EMACS user, you've lost all right to debate the English language. Any high school English teacher would fly into a spittle-flecked rage if they discovered a piece of work edited in such a fashion.

Not to devolve into editor r-wars or anything, but how would an English teacher (or anyone else for that matter) be able to tell if a given text file had been written using EMACS, or vi, or Notepad, or even using "cat >".

If you see an English teacher flying into a spittle-flecked rage, I'd wager the likelihood was far higher that Micros~1 Word was somehow involved...

So you've brought up four possible scenarios. Yahtzee is:

1) being a snob using words most internet hounds have never heard of.

So look it up! You have a fscking computer in front of you! What, is Merriam-Webster's site offline? Did Google suddenly stop working? It's not like he's using some archaic shading you need the latest copy of the OED to decipher... (*headdesk*)

3) using EMACS, destroying any crediblity he once had.

Based on the screenshots that have appeared in his videos, I think he's a Notepad user...

Apart from the space you need to use the thing, i, for one, relax while gaming. Not jump around and do something that would only take a button press. Same with shouting "grenade" to throw a grenade, id rather press a button. Maybe thats my age? Im 34 and rather not shout at a computer to do a simple action. Mostly cos i have neighbors that my not appreciate shouts of "grenade" at 3 in the morning. I like the Forza 4 head turn thing, but is it worth by the kinect for? No, its not.

If it came packaged with the next console, then fine. But it doesnt offer much to me as a product.

ewhac:
...Which is a Romance language, which means its roots are in Latin.

The individual words from the meaning of "apropos," have roots in Latin. The word itself does not, it comes from the French phrase "on the subject." I figure the closest you can get to it in Latin is "in (on the) sermonem (subject)."

Not to devolve into editor r-wars or anything, but how would an English teacher (or anyone else for that matter) be able to tell if a given text file had been written using EMACS, or vi, or Notepad, or even using "cat >".

By considering how they speak and write normally, with how they "wrote" their essay. Why do you think I spoke up about "apropos?" Who uses that word in everyday coversation if they aren't getting it from a word of the day calander or a computer editor? Would you?

So look it up! You have a fscking computer in front of you! What, is Merriam-Webster's site offline? Did Google suddenly stop working? It's not like he's using some archaic shading you need the latest copy of the OED to decipher... (*headdesk*)

He said, without a trace of irony. You already used the word incorrectly once so don't talk to me about needing a dictionary. I know what "apropos" means, I know it's easy to look up.

But any editor worth his salt knows its better to use everyday words than to dig up something esoteric just to sound professional, because it draws attention to itself and distracts the reader, especially when you've got a gut-feeling the writer doesn't use the word outside of that once instance. It reeks of thesaurus-hunting.

I guess it would be cool if one of those ultra-gory games and you swing your arm from left to right for melee, and the mechanics involved actually cut your enemy's head off or something like that.

Or have something to do with Gears of Wars' chainsaw, where you pull it down across the bad guy's body.

Never really thought of that. Still doesn't sell it to me.

Also, Mass Effect 3 is using voice commands with it that, at E3, seemed to work pretty well.

SnakeoilSage:
Motion controls weren't fun when the Power Glove was released. Advancing the technology has proven that it was never meant to be fun. Can we all get over the gimmicky crap and stick to making mainstream titles better?

And "apropos." Way to use that Word of the Day Calender (fix'd), Yahtzee. Have you ever spoken that word aloud in an appropriate sentence? If not, let's hope tomorrow's word is "pretentious."

If I may be so bold as to throw in my two cents.
Just listen to the way the man talks and it's very easy to see he really likes using some words that not everyone uses. I too use randomly out of place words when I feel like it. Do I use apropos? No. At least not yet but I now have one more word to through into my vocabulary and I will use it where apropos. That doesn't sound right but oh well I'll figure out in time. I'm sure that as a writer he has come across many different words to use in his arsenal and his nature of using creative analogies and the like will build upon itself to the point where he just uses it as it pops into his head.

Also may I say that it's a little hypocritical that you're calling him pretentious whereas you're arguing that he is not the person you think he is because you are aware of a word that most other people are not while citing your knowledge of the subject to ehwac. Not trying to be offensive or anything just throwing it out there.

VyseRogueKing:

SnakeoilSage:
And "apropos." Way to use that Word of the Day Calender (fix'd), Yahtzee. Have you ever spoken that word aloud in an appropriate sentence? If not, let's hope tomorrow's word is "pretentious."

*Laughs* I spell calendar wrong all the time, but you spelled it wrong when you tried to correct me, too. None of us are coming out of this unscathed. *Laughs*

If I may be so bold as to throw in my two cents.
Just listen to the way the man talks and it's very easy to see he really likes using some words that not everyone uses. I too use randomly out of place words when I feel like it. Do I use apropos? No. At least not yet but I now have one more word to through into my vocabulary and I will use it where apropos. That doesn't sound right but oh well I'll figure out in time. I'm sure that as a writer he has come across many different words to use in his arsenal and his nature of using creative analogies and the like will build upon itself to the point where he just uses it as it pops into his head.

I will not disagree that Yhatee is an intelligent person. My complaint stems from his decision to use it in favor of more commonplace words. Why not use "on the subject" or "by the way" in his sentence?

If you have taken a professional writing course, you learn that what you write is as much about what you don't say as what you do. Esoteric words sound impressive but distract the reader (as it did me), more so if you don't know what the word means, and adverbs are like nuggets of redundancy. People with large vocabularies don't need big words anyways; that same knowledge gives them plenty of alternatives without resorting to fancier words.

Also may I say that it's a little hypocritical that you're calling him pretentious whereas you're arguing that he is not the person you think he is because you are aware of a word that most other people are not while citing your knowledge of the subject to ehwac. Not trying to be offensive or anything just throwing it out there.

If I were citing my knowledge to ehwac to impress him or someone else, I'd be pretentious, but I was using what I knew to counter his arguements, which I felt were very uninformed. I will admit to patronizing him, though.

The arguments against motion controls are a rant I have ranted many times before, so I'll just keep you up to speed with the short version: immersion depends upon being able to give commands as quickly as you can respond and physical feedback that instantly confirms that the command has been made, both of which motion controls willfully defy.

I've been over this with you before Yahtzee, that is just your overly pompous ass talking. This is why I say Yahtzee has an immersion fetish. He's so completely dedicated to act that he thinks if you break him out of it you automatically fail whereas I've played both Mario Galaxies, Metroid Prime 3 and Sin & Punishment on the Wii and I'll be damned if I wasn't immersed in those games despite the motion control. (Which makes me think he didn't really play the Mario Galaxy games so much as just spend 5 minutes playing demos of them at a GameStop and looked up footage on the internet for everything else he mentions in those reviews)

I can't believe I gotta bring this up AGAIN and in regards to the Kinect. Personally I think it was a nice try but it was inevitable that all it would do is just make the Motion Control trend look even worse when it's fad status and a group of money grubbing developers that didn't give two craps making shovelware weren't helping matters. That's my whole point when it comes to this topic: it's only a gimmick and a fad because it was for the most part, completely wasted potential.

And the Kinect? Probably the biggest example of potential wasted. Having a camera that can scan things from the real world into the game world? Cool novelty idea but having said camera double as our controller? That's where it dropped the ball. We're not ready to jump that far into gaming technology yet.

SnakeoilSage:

*Laughs* I spell calendar wrong all the time, but you spelled it wrong when you tried to correct me, too. None of us are coming out of this unscathed. *Laughs*

D'oh you're quite right. I guess we both screwed up a little there. ^.^;

I will not disagree that Yhatee is an intelligent person. My complaint stems from his decision to use it in favor of more commonplace words. Why not use "on the subject" or "by the way" in his sentence?

That's just the type of person he is or at least the persona he conveys. At least that's what I think.

If you have taken a professional writing course, you learn that what you write is as much about what you don't say as what you do. Esoteric words sound impressive but distract the reader (as it did me), more so if you don't know what the word means, and adverbs are like nuggets of redundancy. People with large vocabularies don't need big words anyways; that same knowledge gives them plenty of alternatives without resorting to fancier words.

I have not taken a professional writing course but that is definitely a fact I need to take down. And I can see how it would faze readers especially when the purpose of the article was to get the point across.

If I were citing my knowledge to ehwac to impress him or someone else, I'd be pretentious, but I was using what I knew to counter his arguements, which I felt were very uninformed. I will admit to patronizing him, though.

I see. You've seemed to have answered everything and I wholly understand your point. It is a bit unnecessary to have used apropos and that it would probably would've helped if he had gone about a different way of saying it. However, I still hold my stance on that he chose the word out of his mind rather than decided to look it up and said, "Hey, that sounds like a cool word to use." Now you can go on with your regularly scheduled argument with ehwac.

I will not disagree that Yhatee is an intelligent person. My complaint stems from his decision to use it in favor of more commonplace words. Why not use "on the subject" or "by the way" in his sentence?

...Because that's not what the phrase 'apropos of nothing' means? It's a more elegant way of saying that something was said or done with no apparent cause, and the expression would be readily recognisable to a speaker of British English. It's only pretentious if you don't know what it means. :/

Gasp! Yahtzee, saying Kinect has potential? How could it possibly be? It's almost like him saying that Heavy Rain's odd control scheme had potential, or seeing how a variant of game could arouse in others the same emotions he feels from placing a small mass of lead between someone's eyes from a kilometer away with a reasonable rifle!

In all seriousness, the comments related to the use of the word apropos are making me laugh and cringe in equal measure. Someone chose to use a word that is roughly synonymous, rather than exactingly equivalent! Sacrebleu! Oh, how ever shall the world manage to cope? Oh, right, they'll gripe about it on the internet, while pedants like me laugh at their quibbles.

VyseRogueKing:
D'oh you're quite right. I guess we both screwed up a little there. ^.^;

*Chuckle* I think this discussion has cost us all Sanity and IQ points.

I have not taken a professional writing course but that is definitely a fact I need to take down. And I can see how it would faze readers especially when the purpose of the article was to get the point across.

I know that they teach it, but I cannot honestly say I learned it from a writing course. I think I myself learned it from Stephen King's book On Writing. *Laughs*

I see. You've seemed to have answered everything and I wholly understand your point. It is a bit unnecessary to have used apropos and that it would probably would've helped if he had gone about a different way of saying it. However, I still hold my stance on that he chose the word out of his mind rather than decided to look it up and said, "Hey, that sounds like a cool word to use." Now you can go on with your regularly scheduled argument with ehwac.

Nah, I've been bickering on forums all day, I've gone crosseyed.

I will say this though, to discredit my own arguement. I've trained myself to notice words, and I think that mentality made a big flaming mountain out of a molehill. Really, I'm arguing whether one person's use of a word makes him a snob. And I admit, I did it as much smug as I could bring to bear. I think it's best I just drop the whole issue and pull my head out of my own puckered posterior.

And I'll also thank you VyseRogueKing, for being the sensible voice of reason I wasn't. It helped me find a proper perspective.

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