Jimquisition: Sony, Nintendo, EA and SOPA

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Just currious, since it's just an american bill, and not a world-wide one, won't the publishers be powerless, if the servers hosting the stuff is located somewhere outside the US?

Cause if stuff works the way i udnerstand it to work, couldn't sites like the escapist just move their servers to a different country?
Then the publishers, would have to to to the ISPs and make them block content ever so often, and that would be the ISPs choice, and since they want paying costumers, they're probably not gonna cut some content from their "store" willingly, just cause EA is bitching about some site using a picture from their game, in a review of said fucking game.

If this passes, will dev's be able choose who's allowed to review their games as well? or can they just limit them to using text, and not any imagery at all?

With all the shit thats going on, i'd love to see the world of gamers unite, get a few solid games that can hold for the time beeing, and buycot games all together, untill the indistry collapses and dies screaming, and then watch it claw it's way back, hopefully more humble than before.

First thing is first.

Jim, I don't know how much your acting for effect but I think you overdid it a bit this time as you seemed a little bit off your rocker and a little incoherant at times. You might want to sit back and try and re-record this message a bit calmer and elaborate a bit more.... also the whole "Streaming God Of War for Charity" thing was kind of "WTF" because honestly giving away someone elses game for a charity (which might not even be genuine despite what was claimed) would be pushing it.

That said, this bill *IS* really bad, and represents a lot of things that game and media companies have wanted to push for a long time, and it is really an Orwellian nightmare of a bill.

The issue with this is that by definition things like game reviews, let's plays, or even people doing FAQS for sites like Gamefaqs could also be considered violations. High traffic sites like Youtube which couldn't be effectively policed if they wanted to are pretty much doomed, and this is to say nothing of P2P services which do have legitimate uses other than piracy.

Strictly speaking a game company SHOULD have to go through the proper channels and specifically identify and chase down specific offenders as opposed to being able to decide "well Youtube has something we don't like, so let's lock it down". The issue of
course being that it's too time consuming and expensive to pursue things that way. Even verifying and pursueing a single case could take a lot of time and money, so it's easier to just shut down anything they find suspicious.

I'll also be blunt in saying that I think the current issues with Metacritic have a lot to do with this as well, albiet indirectly. Simply put, the game industry is realizing that while it can sway professional reviewers and ensure no product with a decent investment of cash gets lower than say an 8/10 rating in most cases, it can't do this reliably with specific users or independant reviewers who have no financial stake, not even so far as them being able to threaten to pull advertising revenues. Given that some popular reviewers on things like Youtube can pull truely massive numbers of hits, and actually do sway opinions, the gaming industry is doubtlessly also considering that they could shut these sources down. Someone like Whiteythereviewer, or Danae from Checkpoint Basement Level could get Youtube shut down as a whole just by showing footage from a game they are playing to illustrate a point.

I also know that there has been some talk fairly recently about the problem with online FAQS and walkthroughs, because game companies and cluebook publishers increasingly want to charge $20 or more for digital strategy guides, and really there is no point to buying a digital strategy guide when a month or two after the game comes out (tops) someone can just hop on Gamefaqs and find a guide there, or even find a dedicated wiki to the game in some cases. This bill could be used to basically shut down their competition here, and close every cheat/strategy site and fan page/database on the internet which I'm sure some bean counter is drooling about as I write this as they count digital cluebook sales figures in their heads.

This is a lot of stuff I'm talking about here, but the bottom line is that as I understand this, this is going to be a very bad thing. This law exists to basically circumvent the existing system because companies find it inconveinent to play by the rules.

Of course a lot of this also gets into intellectual property laws to begin with, and I think a lot of these problems started when they made them so tight knit for the owner of an IP. Technically according to the definition something like a FAQ should be illegal despite the long-term existance of such things... and that's part of the problem. When we're dealing with properties that are pure information (as opposed to say information used to make an actual product like a patent or copyright) I think there needs to be a lot of limitations put in place because there is more at stake than the information itself, but people's very freedom to communicate when you get down to it. In the case of IPs I think it's a problem when say China takes the formula for a drug like Viagra, makes an actual physical product using it, and then sells it. In this case though your pretty much saying that a picture of a game being used for review purposes, or even just text and descriptions talking about content in the game, could be considered theft. This is more akin to me telling someone that Viagra exists, or my experiences with the drug rather than stealing an actual, physical product. Games DO need to be protected from someone copying the entire thing and giving it away for free (or selling it) but this is far too inclusive to my understanding, and Jim is right that this law could shut down pretty much the entire internet gaming community, or at the very least turn it into a paranoid police state with everyone running a website being terrified to let anything be said for fear of being shut down. Just imagine a situation where a spoiler might not just ruin a bit of a game for someone, but actually be a felony because you've revealed protected information.

teisjm:
Just currious, since it's just an american bill, and not a world-wide one, won't the publishers be powerless, if the servers hosting the stuff is located somewhere outside the US?

Cause if stuff works the way i udnerstand it to work, couldn't sites like the escapist just move their servers to a different country?
Then the publishers, would have to to to the ISPs and make them block content ever so often, and that would be the ISPs choice, and since they want paying costumers, they're probably not gonna cut some content from their "store" willingly, just cause EA is bitching about some site using a picture from their game, in a review of said fucking game.

If this passes, will dev's be able choose who's allowed to review their games as well? or can they just limit them to using text, and not any imagery at all?

With all the shit thats going on, i'd love to see the world of gamers unite, get a few solid games that can hold for the time beeing, and buycot games all together, untill the indistry collapses and dies screaming, and then watch it claw it's way back, hopefully more humble than before.

Nope, they'll be perfectly in fine. They have the power to demand that the ISPs block the sites entirely, without any sort of oversight at all, without even having to state what the site is doing at all.

And yeah, they will. Heck, for all we know, they'll probably be able to claim using the very name of the game is copyright infringement, and force a bad review to be taken down. Remember, this bill gives them corporations the ability to censor the internet without any oversight at all.

And it's not just games, but movies and music industries as well. This is the same type of stuff that China does to censor non-government sanctioned opinions.

Isn't this just like ACTA and the other 55,000,000 subsequent names they've tried to pass the bill under since?

I'm not really worried famous last words but if it passes. I'll just stop using the net, I'll go out more and probably have a better, healthier life for it.

I mean, whenever I'm not doing work or surfing the net I'm out at the pub or bars or something. So if we cut the net out of that equation I'd probably just spend 2 parts of my time at bars and 1 part working... Or something like that. Sounds good to me, or maybe more exercise... That might be the healthier option. I might take up another martial art... or find a nice long cycling route.

Ooooooh, come onnnnnnnn SOPA.

Just for the simple people I was being slightly flippant there.

This proves once and for all that Sony, EA, and Nintendo aren't worth supporting, and as far as I am concerned, they deserve all the piracy they get. They screw us with DRM and DLC and they're screwing us again by supporting a vague oppressive law. They don't care about customers, only about how much they can shake out of your pockets while holding you upside down by the ankles.

image

Everyone will be happy to know that this thing is pretty much dead in the water. People have been trying to do things exactly like this for a lot of things for a very long time. For instance: When I was 17 and training in Jeet Kun Do, our instructor had us write our congressman for the express purpose that people were trying to pass a bill that would allow a central agency to dictate what martial art schools were and were not allowed to teach. I was scared to death at the time (and a little excited at the prospect of secretly training people in a forbidden martial art).

Things like this never get anywhere. It's worth watching, but there are enough responsible representatives in the House and Senate to see this thing never make it. And thank god they aren't all completely useless twits.

While no one should be for piracy, the shitty part is that this would not prevent piracy. It will be harder maybe, for a little while at least, but it won't stop. And the backlash from the destruction of internet freedom would hurt them badly I think.

Huh, to plagiarize Jim, 'thank God... that Microsoft isn't in on this bill too.' At least ONE of the software giants realises this is a stupid idea.

And what worries me, is that the bill (correct me if I'm wrong) doesn't just limit companies to taking down US-hosted sites. If this goes through, it could possible allow companies FULL RIGHTS TO THE ENTIRE FUCKING INTERNET.

Again, correct me if I'm wrong, and I sure hope I am.

How this law is called? James Taggart law?

Geez, and I thought Youtube was stupid about copyrights already... There's NO WAY IN HELL I'M GONNA STAND FOR THIS!

CustomMagnum:

Thankfully Obama already said he would veto it if it does pass

That was the net neutrality bill. Last I heard, Obama supports this bill, but everybody seems to be saying who does and doesn't support this without any sources to back it up. So, unless you have a direct source saying Obama intends to veto both SOPA and PIPA, I'm going to assume he supports it.

Yeah, I heard about this a while ago. Totally sucks! Thankfully, it seems the chances of this thing passing seems slim. Still, I hadn't heard that so many of my favourite videogame companies support this (although I can't say I'm surprised, them being corporation and all...). For shame!

trollnystan:
"Sopa" in Swedish means "piece of trash". Coincidentally that's also how I feel about this bill. Let's hope Obama sticks by his word and vetoes this if it passes.

Thank you for reminding me of this btw xD:

I'm surprised he didn't mention the Protect IP Act when talking about this.

I've been doing all I can to slow this Juggernaut but in the end I don't think it's really gonna matter, hopefully it doesn't pass. Just more rights being taken away, I swear these arrogant bastards either want an uprising or they think the public is too stupid to ever do anything truly worthwhile that could have a real lasting effect. I tend to think it's the latter and sadly I'm almost to the point of agreeing with that opinion.

It won't pass, I mean the USA has the most democratic system in the world thats not at all biased towards the big companies that give it lots of money ...

... oh SHIT

Versuvius:
I'm just wondering. If this passes and everyone who hosts themselves in the US, hop country and host their servers elsewhere, how long it will take the US to flop its dick around and extend its big floppy juridstriction to other countries? And how long it will take them to be told to fuck right off.

well if you really wanted to go somewhere that doesn't give a f*ck about intellectual property rights, you could go to mainland China, lol. Seriously I don't think you would have any trouble over there as long as none of your videos say anything bad about the CCP.

RJ Dalton:

CustomMagnum:

Thankfully Obama already said he would veto it if it does pass

That was the net neutrality bill. Last I heard, Obama supports this bill, but everybody seems to be saying who does and doesn't support this without any sources to back it up. So, unless you have a direct source saying Obama intends to veto both SOPA and PIPA, I'm going to assume he supports it.

... Wow, you're right. I could've sworn that I read that he was going to veto this, but now I can't find it for sure.

Still, I really can't see him supporting a bill that allows corporations to completely block and destroy websites without having to answer to everyone while at the same time being against a law that would allow corporations to pay money so that ISPs would block certain websites while making access to their sites faster.

Nice democracy you have there guys, where a law proposition that directly cancels free speech has chances of passing. Nice.

Are you guys serious?! I'm a law student and I might burn my tonge, but since when did the internet was really censored? Do you even know how to shutt an ISP works? I'll give 3 examples. First of Google and pedophiles on Orkut.

http://searchengineland.com/90-percent-of-pedophilia-complaints-in-brazil-come-from-googles-orkut-13742

Orkut still exists. It took several complaints and a law who was to block orkut in Brazil to force Google to put servers in Brazil to be monitored. Second one is Pirate Bay.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Pirate_Bay

Just read their story! Never they managed to stop pirate bay from exist. They tried to shut it down. Mininova became popular after their first attempt. After mininova was shut and started to show only open content a bunch of torrent sites grew on the trail of mininova (kickass torrents for example). My last example is China censorship. There is a vast content about China censorship problem over the net. Just read this one:

https://freedom-to-tinker.com/blog/felten/chinese-internet-censorship-see-it-yourself
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Internet_censorship (this one cos wikipedia rocks, even when it fails)

Now in the legal aspect, not ever company in the world is transnational. Let's say a certain ISP which only exist in Germany stream game content going against US law. Well to bad for US law all they can do is a formal complaint. What this law creates now is the power to some publishers to censor some sites (mainly in english and from US) which give them bad reviews about their products. There is also the question of first ammendment. Not easy to write about it now, but rest assure that this law will never see the day of light.
PS: not with this text, not with this president

Volf99:

Versuvius:
I'm just wondering. If this passes and everyone who hosts themselves in the US, hop country and host their servers elsewhere, how long it will take the US to flop its dick around and extend its big floppy juridstriction to other countries? And how long it will take them to be told to fuck right off.

well if you really wanted to go somewhere that doesn't give a f*ck about intellectual property rights, you could go to mainland China, lol. Seriously I don't think you would have any trouble over there as long as none of your videos say anything bad about the CCP.

massive firewall is a bit of an issue. Russia is much better, so is Switzerland and Germany.

Been following this bill for a while now, and signing every petition I can come across.
This bill is one of those things that your government does that you think "lol no, my government cannot be that bad. You got that from some comic or movie where the government is a complete ass right?", but actually exists...

See, this would be cool if they could only use it to block people file sharing games. But no, they have to be douchebags about it and make it so vague that they can come after someone doing a stream to raise money for charity, or someone doing a video review to help spread the word about a great game, or even me doing video guides to help people unlock achievements and trophies in their games. If you want to try and stop piracy in ways that don't involve paying customers like me having to put up with bullshit forms of DRM, cool. But only go after pirates! Stop trying to leave the door open to go after everyone else too.

Therumancer:
also the whole "Streaming God Of War for Charity" thing was kind of "WTF" because honestly giving away someone elses game for a charity (which might not even be genuine despite what was claimed) would be pushing it.

Uhm, no. Streaming is not giving away someone else's game. Streaming is playing a game live and recording it live so people can watch you play it live. Take for example: http://desertbus.org/ That's streaming for charity.

Sir Shockwave:
Oh Jim, just do what I do for the Blog - use the written and recorded one for next week X3

Quick EDIT - Wow. Seems America's having it bad right now. First there's the Protect IP act, now this...unless the two are one and the same.

They arent, numerous companies just keep trying to pass different bills for the same purpose, every one has been shot down because if they actually use these laws to do these idiotic acts alot of CEO's, congressmen, and other people who are involved will lose there jobs.

KouThan:
Nice democracy you have there guys, where a law proposition that directly cancels free speech has chances of passing. Nice.

Actually, that's a reason why, if it passes, this would certainly be challenged in the courts for it's legality. It would be likely to loose that fight if it's wording does remain as broad as it is.

Therumancer:
First thing is first.

Jim, I don't know how much your acting for effect but I think you overdid it a bit this time as you seemed a little bit off your rocker and a little incoherant at times. You might want to sit back and try and re-record this message a bit calmer and elaborate a bit more.... also the whole "Streaming God Of War for Charity" thing was kind of "WTF" because honestly giving away someone elses game for a charity (which might not even be genuine despite what was claimed) would be pushing it.

That said, this bill *IS* really bad, and represents a lot of things that game and media companies have wanted to push for a long time, and it is really an Orwellian nightmare of a bill.

The issue with this is that by definition things like game reviews, let's plays, or even people doing FAQS for sites like Gamefaqs could also be considered violations. High traffic sites like Youtube which couldn't be effectively policed if they wanted to are pretty much doomed, and this is to say nothing of P2P services which do have legitimate uses other than piracy.

Strictly speaking a game company SHOULD have to go through the proper channels and specifically identify and chase down specific offenders as opposed to being able to decide "well Youtube has something we don't like, so let's lock it down". The issue of
course being that it's too time consuming and expensive to pursue things that way. Even verifying and pursueing a single case could take a lot of time and money, so it's easier to just shut down anything they find suspicious.

I'll also be blunt in saying that I think the current issues with Metacritic have a lot to do with this as well, albiet indirectly. Simply put, the game industry is realizing that while it can sway professional reviewers and ensure no product with a decent investment of cash gets lower than say an 8/10 rating in most cases, it can't do this reliably with specific users or independant reviewers who have no financial stake, not even so far as them being able to threaten to pull advertising revenues. Given that some popular reviewers on things like Youtube can pull truely massive numbers of hits, and actually do sway opinions, the gaming industry is doubtlessly also considering that they could shut these sources down. Someone like Whiteythereviewer, or Danae from Checkpoint Basement Level could get Youtube shut down as a whole just by showing footage from a game they are playing to illustrate a point.

I also know that there has been some talk fairly recently about the problem with online FAQS and walkthroughs, because game companies and cluebook publishers increasingly want to charge $20 or more for digital strategy guides, and really there is no point to buying a digital strategy guide when a month or two after the game comes out (tops) someone can just hop on Gamefaqs and find a guide there, or even find a dedicated wiki to the game in some cases. This bill could be used to basically shut down their competition here, and close every cheat/strategy site and fan page/database on the internet which I'm sure some bean counter is drooling about as I write this as they count digital cluebook sales figures in their heads.

This is a lot of stuff I'm talking about here, but the bottom line is that as I understand this, this is going to be a very bad thing. This law exists to basically circumvent the existing system because companies find it inconveinent to play by the rules.

Of course a lot of this also gets into intellectual property laws to begin with, and I think a lot of these problems started when they made them so tight knit for the owner of an IP. Technically according to the definition something like a FAQ should be illegal despite the long-term existance of such things... and that's part of the problem. When we're dealing with properties that are pure information (as opposed to say information used to make an actual product like a patent or copyright) I think there needs to be a lot of limitations put in place because there is more at stake than the information itself, but people's very freedom to communicate when you get down to it. In the case of IPs I think it's a problem when say China takes the formula for a drug like Viagra, makes an actual physical product using it, and then sells it. In this case though your pretty much saying that a picture of a game being used for review purposes, or even just text and descriptions talking about content in the game, could be considered theft. This is more akin to me telling someone that Viagra exists, or my experiences with the drug rather than stealing an actual, physical product. Games DO need to be protected from someone copying the entire thing and giving it away for free (or selling it) but this is far too inclusive to my understanding, and Jim is right that this law could shut down pretty much the entire internet gaming community, or at the very least turn it into a paranoid police state with everyone running a website being terrified to let anything be said for fear of being shut down. Just imagine a situation where a spoiler might not just ruin a bit of a game for someone, but actually be a felony because you've revealed protected information.

This!

You know what gets ME?! Every time I see a television advertisement for a game where it boldly proclaims that it's a "9 out of 10" or "Greatest game this console generation!" and then the "quote" is attributed to THE COMPANY producing the game!

I mean, saying "Uncharted 3 blows away any other game on the market - Playstation magazine" is just SONY's way of tooting their own horn. Or when I see "Amazing, Outstanding - Xbox magazine" for a Microsoft published game.. There's something incredibly misleading about that.

Protect IP also important to watch:
http://vimeo.com/31100268

Nurb:
This proves once and for all that Sony, EA, and Nintendo aren't worth supporting, and as far as I am concerned, they deserve all the piracy they get. They screw us with DRM and DLC and they're screwing us again by supporting a vague oppressive law. They don't care about customers, only about how much they can shake out of your pockets while holding you upside down by the ankles.

image

What I don't understand is how something like that would benefit publishers. Looks like it's just an excuse for them to hire more lawyers.

It wouldn't be the first time they shoot themselves in both feet. I'm convinced that they're going to end up regretting this whole online pass BS too once they realize that renter, borrowers, and even used game purchasers occasionally buy new games; however we don't buy games if the best content is hidden from us.

Also, this is not the time. Companies like Sony & EA have a much smaller user base than they had at this point last generation and they should be trying to expand the market. Nintendo got a lot of new people to buy into gaming at the beginning of this generation but nobody has tried to bring them in deeper...all those new gamers are probably still playing wii sports.

Thank god for Jim or else I wouldn't have even known about this latest travesty.

So...we're in a recession, unemployment is at an all time high and they think its a good idea to pass a bill that will put MORE people out of jobs?
MURKA WTF?

Versuvius:
I'm just wondering. If this passes and everyone who hosts themselves in the US, hop country and host their servers elsewhere, how long it will take the US to flop its dick around and extend its big floppy juridstriction to other countries? And how long it will take them to be told to fuck right off.

The whole point of SOPA is to do just that

people need to calm down a little yes it is a shit law i compleatly agree with it but do you guys honestly think that google (owner of youtube) IGN and other large firms would not pony (no pun intended) op with some pretty heavy waight lawyer power to stop this law dead in its track?

Well I'm not American and thus can't sign most of the petitions against the crap but I do strongly urge everyone who can do so. It's a completely ridiculous bill put forward by companies who don't even fucking understand how much communication on the internet HELPS their cause.

Way I see it is if America can't stop this bs from getting through then the rest of the world will slowly follow until the internet is censored globally. So yeah please do your best to stop this shit and if it somehow does go through then you should fucking protest, way more than that 99% occupy wall street stuff.

Also has anyone stood up and said how censoring the internet is the kind of shit they do in Communist states like China? Just putting that one out there, that sworn enemy of the USA (Communism I mean not China) who are always being called out on their restricted freedoms and harsh censorship.

HyenaThePirate:

Therumancer:
First thing is first.

Jim, I don't know how much your acting for effect but I think you overdid it a bit this time as you seemed a little bit off your rocker and a little incoherant at times. You might want to sit back and try and re-record this message a bit calmer and elaborate a bit more.... also the whole "Streaming God Of War for Charity" thing was kind of "WTF" because honestly giving away someone elses game for a charity (which might not even be genuine despite what was claimed) would be pushing it.

That said, this bill *IS* really bad, and represents a lot of things that game and media companies have wanted to push for a long time, and it is really an Orwellian nightmare of a bill.

The issue with this is that by definition things like game reviews, let's plays, or even people doing FAQS for sites like Gamefaqs could also be considered violations. High traffic sites like Youtube which couldn't be effectively policed if they wanted to are pretty much doomed, and this is to say nothing of P2P services which do have legitimate uses other than piracy.

Strictly speaking a game company SHOULD have to go through the proper channels and specifically identify and chase down specific offenders as opposed to being able to decide "well Youtube has something we don't like, so let's lock it down". The issue of
course being that it's too time consuming and expensive to pursue things that way. Even verifying and pursueing a single case could take a lot of time and money, so it's easier to just shut down anything they find suspicious.

I'll also be blunt in saying that I think the current issues with Metacritic have a lot to do with this as well, albiet indirectly. Simply put, the game industry is realizing that while it can sway professional reviewers and ensure no product with a decent investment of cash gets lower than say an 8/10 rating in most cases, it can't do this reliably with specific users or independant reviewers who have no financial stake, not even so far as them being able to threaten to pull advertising revenues. Given that some popular reviewers on things like Youtube can pull truely massive numbers of hits, and actually do sway opinions, the gaming industry is doubtlessly also considering that they could shut these sources down. Someone like Whiteythereviewer, or Danae from Checkpoint Basement Level could get Youtube shut down as a whole just by showing footage from a game they are playing to illustrate a point.

I also know that there has been some talk fairly recently about the problem with online FAQS and walkthroughs, because game companies and cluebook publishers increasingly want to charge $20 or more for digital strategy guides, and really there is no point to buying a digital strategy guide when a month or two after the game comes out (tops) someone can just hop on Gamefaqs and find a guide there, or even find a dedicated wiki to the game in some cases. This bill could be used to basically shut down their competition here, and close every cheat/strategy site and fan page/database on the internet which I'm sure some bean counter is drooling about as I write this as they count digital cluebook sales figures in their heads.

This is a lot of stuff I'm talking about here, but the bottom line is that as I understand this, this is going to be a very bad thing. This law exists to basically circumvent the existing system because companies find it inconveinent to play by the rules.

Of course a lot of this also gets into intellectual property laws to begin with, and I think a lot of these problems started when they made them so tight knit for the owner of an IP. Technically according to the definition something like a FAQ should be illegal despite the long-term existance of such things... and that's part of the problem. When we're dealing with properties that are pure information (as opposed to say information used to make an actual product like a patent or copyright) I think there needs to be a lot of limitations put in place because there is more at stake than the information itself, but people's very freedom to communicate when you get down to it. In the case of IPs I think it's a problem when say China takes the formula for a drug like Viagra, makes an actual physical product using it, and then sells it. In this case though your pretty much saying that a picture of a game being used for review purposes, or even just text and descriptions talking about content in the game, could be considered theft. This is more akin to me telling someone that Viagra exists, or my experiences with the drug rather than stealing an actual, physical product. Games DO need to be protected from someone copying the entire thing and giving it away for free (or selling it) but this is far too inclusive to my understanding, and Jim is right that this law could shut down pretty much the entire internet gaming community, or at the very least turn it into a paranoid police state with everyone running a website being terrified to let anything be said for fear of being shut down. Just imagine a situation where a spoiler might not just ruin a bit of a game for someone, but actually be a felony because you've revealed protected information.

This!

You know what gets ME?! Every time I see a television advertisement for a game where it boldly proclaims that it's a "9 out of 10" or "Greatest game this console generation!" and then the "quote" is attributed to THE COMPANY producing the game!

I mean, saying "Uncharted 3 blows away any other game on the market - Playstation magazine" is just SONY's way of tooting their own horn. Or when I see "Amazing, Outstanding - Xbox magazine" for a Microsoft published game.. There's something incredibly misleading about that.

...You do realize that Microsoft/Sony doesn't actually own those magazines right? They are just magazines that exclusively cover Xbox/PS3 content

CustomMagnum:

teisjm:
Just currious, since it's just an american bill, and not a world-wide one, won't the publishers be powerless, if the servers hosting the stuff is located somewhere outside the US?

Cause if stuff works the way i udnerstand it to work, couldn't sites like the escapist just move their servers to a different country?
Then the publishers, would have to to to the ISPs and make them block content ever so often, and that would be the ISPs choice, and since they want paying costumers, they're probably not gonna cut some content from their "store" willingly, just cause EA is bitching about some site using a picture from their game, in a review of said fucking game.

If this passes, will dev's be able choose who's allowed to review their games as well? or can they just limit them to using text, and not any imagery at all?

With all the shit thats going on, i'd love to see the world of gamers unite, get a few solid games that can hold for the time beeing, and buycot games all together, untill the indistry collapses and dies screaming, and then watch it claw it's way back, hopefully more humble than before.

Nope, they'll be perfectly in fine. They have the power to demand that the ISPs block the sites entirely, without any sort of oversight at all, without even having to state what the site is doing at all.

And yeah, they will. Heck, for all we know, they'll probably be able to claim using the very name of the game is copyright infringement, and force a bad review to be taken down. Remember, this bill gives them corporations the ability to censor the internet without any oversight at all.

And it's not just games, but movies and music industries as well. This is the same type of stuff that China does to censor non-government sanctioned opinions.

Well, guess that at least the ISP's will be hiring more people, to put up with the constant flow of demands from fucktard the coorporations planning to use this law.

If this passes, won't people be still able to proxy past the blocks anyways?
again, i can't possibly imagine, that they can shut down sites hosted outside the US, that are legal outside the US, so won't it have as little effect as when my ISP blocks pirate-bay?

Versuvius:
I'm just wondering. If this passes and everyone who hosts themselves in the US, hop country and host their servers elsewhere, how long it will take the US to flop its dick around and extend its big floppy juridstriction to other countries? And how long it will take them to be told to fuck right off.

Well this is exactly what's going to happen. American businesses won't be willing to invest in IP from the US so they'll take their business to "IP-free" zones. The same way there are tax-free zones like the Caymans right now. Say goodbye to your American tradition of free trade for local businesses, big and small.

It's a depressing situation. Thankfully, over 700,000 people signed an online petition opposing it in the last week or so.

http://demandprogress.org/
http://stopcensorship.org/

I really hope some publishers and developers put their foot down and call this bill out on the sheer ridiculousness of it. This could literally stop people from posting their friggin' opinions about a game, something that obviously conflicts with freedom of speech.

edit: Oh come on, why do I need my address and zip code to fill out these petitions?

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