Jimquisition: Sony, Nintendo, EA and SOPA

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Zachary Amaranth:

amaranth_dru:

I think its more along the lines that Jim is bringing to people's attention the idea that these things are being proposed, not that they have a chance (at the moment) of being passed.

He should try actually doing that, then.

Y'know, if it takes some exaggeration to point out the problem, he should go for it. The problem of this act is seriously dangerous for the internet as is. Companies would go crazy blocking sites left and right. Legislation like this shouldn't even be written. There are already copyright laws in place to punish the kind of things this act would be used to go after first. Piracy is a problem, but banning the internet isn't the way to stop it.

I don't think most people grasp the gravity of a bill like this being passed in the United States. I have even seen people here on the Escapist saying things along the lines of

"Well I am not in America so it doesn't effect me."

Oh yes it does.

Any site hosted in the United States, including the Escapist, can be shut down by any corporation that feels fit, as long as they can "prove" there is copyright material on the site, this can include images, music, videos, links to aforementioned items, etc.

Any site hosted or not hosted in the United States that has advertisers in the United States will be forced to stop doing business with the website in question, which can and will shut down the site do to lack of funding. See a lot of ADs from Google? Not anymore.

Also, as much as people will hate to admit this, United States has A LOT of power and say in other countries around the world. They have and will tell other countries to pass equally stupid laws in their own countries censoring the internet even more. Don't believe me? See '3 Strike' laws, all "encouraged" by the United States government to prevent online piracy in other countries.

Edit:
You what is the worst part of it? More money gets point into the economy via the internet then the entertainment industry this bill was set out to protect.

I live in Canada, What exactly can I do to help?

That was really rather eloquent for something that's apparently off the top of your head. Bravo, good sir.

And everyone else needs to listen to Mr Sterling! He speaks the truth.

Therumancer:
First thing is first.

Jim, I don't know how much your acting for effect but I think you overdid it a bit this time as you seemed a little bit off your rocker and a little incoherant at times.

That's because he wasn't acting.

Sounds bad, could really screw things up. Some of the best stuff, jokes, material shut down. The Americans can't of course control the whole internet, they have never been able to do it thus far, beyond their jurisdiction; but they certainly can make things terrible for those within the world's greatest country (propaganda lol). So yeah Jim, really can feel your pain and anxiety here.

Redd the stock, cautionary messages from metal gear indeed.

As if companies don't ALREADY have enough power over their games, (A lot more then most other mediums have over their content) now they want to be able to delete things on a whim and mark off anyone involved in reviewing a game to be in the same league as someone who shoplifts their local game store?

This is completely unacceptable.

Even if this was used in a completely controlled and responsible manner, (not likely) I won't believe anyone who tells me that they WON'T abuse this power.

"Oh dear, a bad review. Oh look, gameplay footage! DELETE."

"Ah, a good review. Let's just pretend we never seen these pictures..."

It's nice to see that the people who fought for hundreds of years in a struggle for human rights is having ALL of their work undermined due to a single piece of paper threatening to take a lot of that away. If I lived in America I would SAY NO TO THIS SHIT.

Fortunately we're not alone in this. Google, Yahoo, and Facebook are all avidly against this bill. Which shouldn't be too big of a surprise since they would all have something to lose. Still, it's nice to know that some of the big corporations are on our side for once.

Game companies are not scared, no1 with that kind of money ever is. They are just plain and simple greedy as hell.

Making people aware is all well and good but what can we actually do?

Honestly, is there a way we can actually help stop this or will it just be a lot of angry faces in the internet crowd we're making?

Heck knows that probably won't change anything.

Out of curiosity when they say Sony and Nintendo are in on this is it specifically the American counterparts going for it? Like is it Nintendo of America being stupid like usually, or are the actual big wigs in Japan supporting it too?

this world is getting crazier by the minute. whats next, downloading games over steam will be a crime too???
are these companies so retarded that they think they lose money that way if youtube etc, shows videos of games? not every one buys magazines to checkout for the latest or upcoming games.
not for long and we will have this kind of crap as east germany over 20 years ago that you cant say anything about the system.

I'm going to laugh when Obama passes this(or rather, does nothing to stop it since these guys are paying for it) and then cry when the internet dies because there is/was nothing that I could do.

I'm not really surprised companies are jumping onto this bill, it gives them a lot of control and it's smart for them to support it, granted I don't agree with the bill and hope it doesn't pass but I'm not going to blame a company or person for supporting something that benefits them.

DisasterArea42:

Y'know, if it takes some exaggeration to point out the problem, he should go for it. The problem of this act is seriously dangerous for the internet as is. Companies would go crazy blocking sites left and right. Legislation like this shouldn't even be written. There are already copyright laws in place to punish the kind of things this act would be used to go after first. Piracy is a problem, but banning the internet isn't the way to stop it.

But fabricating a panic scenario simply makes him look like he's making shit up and undermines the problem.

Draxyle:
I really want to hear all the major videogame companies stand up and explain themselves for this insanity of supporting this self destructive bill.

It's absolutely frightening how powerful corporations have become in just the last few years, we don't need to give them any more. It's not even about money anymore, it's all about the control because that's all that's left that they can grasp for. I'm really losing hope in the process of reversing this horrible trend of putting all of the political power in the hands of a select few CEO's. You can't win against people who have near-limitless funds to destroy opposition.

Firefox had a thing on their front page where they'll send a canned email in your name to your representatives to tell them to not let this thing pass. I've already sent it in myself.

That makes me love Firefox SO MUCH. And I was already a fan.

SOPA = Sign Off People's A**

Those companies signed on the dotted line to sell off the loyal customer. I feel a disturbance in the Derp.

I've been signal-boosting regarding this horrible bill. Besides seeming self-destructive, it's frighteningly vague, and I've been considering abstaining from purchasing products made by the companies who have supported this. I do not pirate, and I do not support piracy, but this is just plain ridiculous.

As a side-note, I also ended up buying Haunting Ground after watching a playthrough of it online and becoming intrigued. It's not one of my favorite horror games. If I hadn't watched that playthrough, I never would have bothered with the purchase.

I've already been spreading the word like made about SOPA, but at least now you have Jim Sterling to explain it for all of you poor souls who aren't convinced that this is a bad idea.

I heard that BSA (Business Software Alliance), a supporter of SOPA and associated with Microsoft and Apple, no longer supports it. Now if only there was a way to convince Sony, Nintendo, Electronic Arts, and the ESA about why SOPA should not be supported. I should also note that Nintendo of America and Sony are both members of the CEA (Consumer Electronics Association), who doesn't support SOPA, and CEA may cancel its membership to the United States Chamber of Commerce because it supports SOPA, just like Yahoo! did, and Google may cancel its membership to the USCoC as well.

Swear to god first time I heard him I thought he "you could be arrested as a fucking felon for streaming gears of war 3 to stop people having hand soap."

I had to rewind it to find out what he said.

Keep up the fight against hand soap.

Oh sweet crispy jesus christ...Kojima was right, i get the feeling that man is laughing manically right now proclaiming "I TOLD YOU!"

If this gets through, then things are probably going to get really fucking bad really fucking quickly. *sighs* God i hate this planet sometimes...Ah well, here's to hoping that it won't get through at all in any way, shape or form whatsoever. I might be in australia, but i know this will put a big dent in the internets freedoms. And considering what Australia's been through in regards to that and games recently, i really wouldn't want to inflict such a thing on the rest of the world.

Seeing as this is a American Law, is there anything Europeans can actually do against it?

Oh Jim. I've not always been your videos' biggest fan, but you both had your heart in the right place and hit the nail on the head this time. Congress has been trying to get this kind of bullshit passed for years and it has to stop. It is literally good for nobody, and cannot but be spearheaded by people who truly do not understand what the internet is or how it benefits everybody in modern society.

A scorched earth policy is not the way to go whether you're trying to scour the world of pirates or of perverts. And it will bite you in the ass because there will be another, less censored internet created that you have cut yourself off from and from all the potential revenue stored therein.

Sony, Nintendo and EA? Huh, looks like Microsoft doesn't feel the need to directly join the retard parade. At least not every corporation has jumped on this wagon. I don't actually know how they're 'indirectly' supporting this but let's just hope it goes no further.

Won't this just mean that online publications/companies like The Escapist here, will just pick up and move to a different country?

Jim's right, this will kill jobs.

ultimatevideogamer:
I heard that BSA (Business Software Alliance), a supporter of SOPA and associated with Microsoft and Apple, no longer supports it. Now if only there was a way to convince Sony, Nintendo, Electronic Arts, and the ESA about why SOPA should not be supported. I should also note that Nintendo of America and Sony are both members of the CEA (Consumer Electronics Association), who doesn't support SOPA, and CEA may cancel its membership to the United States Chamber of Commerce because it supports SOPA, just like Yahoo! did, and Google may cancel its membership to the USCoC as well.

There is a way. The same way everyone got EA to change the redonkulous EULA on their Origin service.

http://www.reddit.com/r/gaming/comments/js51f/ea_origin_spyware_issue_silently_boycotting_will/

Email and send letters to their PR departments and publicists telling them that you're never going to buy another product from them again if they continue to support this. Make sure you do this after you call an your senator/ reps.

I'm planing on including a link to this video in my emails to EA.


Basically I'm going to say that if this law passes this awesome video showing off the technical prowess of Battlefield 3 would be a felony. Do they really want that?

Jimothy Sterling:

BrotherRool:
The passion was amazing, I hope it wasn't acted and it's hard to imagine it was

My voice broke like a squeaky little girl in no less than two places.

Not acted at all, otherwise I'd control that shit. :-)

Jim, you didn't get nearly angry enough, honestly.

The bill is to "stop piracy," which is a stupid losing battle at this point, but the funniest/most offensive part is the pirates are already laughing at the bill, because it won't stop shit. They've already cited that the blocking methods used by other countries are easily circumvented by direct linking to the IP and ignores the DNS. And Pirate Bay has already started talks for a decentralized DNS system like they did with torrent hash tables. All this bill will be able to do is rape more jobs in a time where the country is in a complete shithole of unemployment already.

Jim Sterling, you magnificent bastard.

It is heartening to see actual passion come across in relation to this corrupt piece of legislature.
The greedy shysters should hang their head in shame.

Also the name of it needs to be changed to more accurately portray what it is, personally, I think the "Corporate Underwritten Net Tyranny Act" would be more logical.

Bear in mind, a miniature version of this had been passed in my country, basically outlawing torrents as a data transfer protocol, it snuck into law at the same time as the "Civil Defence Emergency Management Act", in relation to a natural disaster.

Looks like we'll all be under a Deus Ex/ Ghost in the Shell/ System Shock/ Bladerunner style dystopia sooner than predicted; minus all the cool shit with all of the crap - exactly halfway between 'Brave New World' and '1984'.

Am I doomsaying and scaremongering? Maybe.

But it's on par with the massive kneejerk this bill/ act/ law/ whatever is based on.

I feel the heart of Jim's message wasn't so much this bill is so fucking evil (though that was part of it), because any gamer aware of the bill already knows that. The title and content suggested the real focus was Sony, Nintendo, and EA (among others) hopping on board this bill against their own self-interest. They're showing their true colors as greedy, abusive, dumbasses who get sold on concepts too easily. These companies are at the top of the industry, they should be the ones defending gamer rights. Instead, they're supporting an evil evil bill that in all honesty works against them, not for them. They'd rather spit in the face of the people who make them their money and who have stood behind them for decades. WHAT. THE. FUCK.

(P.S. This may not have been Jim's message, it was my interpretation of it, and at the very least I think it's a good point.)

As obnoxious as this Bill is, I don't see it becoming law. Maybe my relaxed attitude is due to being in Australia, which has already rejected any concept of an internet filter (shame about the gaming classifications, though).

Yes, it could conceivably become law. Yes, it is far too broadly framed and should be severely cut back - if not outright dropped - if the legislators responsible are genuine about their stated objects. Yes, it could be used in an utterly draconian manner, and in the ways that Jim Sterling asserts. I'd be much more worried about the privacy and reporting aspects of the Bill, which seem much more likely to get through in a modified format.

portal_cat:
they don't have a leg to stand on. And don't forget the fact the Supreme Court will probably help kill this bill because it violates the First Amendment right of free speech.

This was my first thought when I read the Bill. There is no way in hell it could operate as broadly as asserted without violating the First Amendment, even if it does become law. The power to shut down sites depends on obtaining a court order, and that's going to be hard act to pull off. The SCOTUS won't let it through unless the conservatives on the bench suddenly abandon all sense of principle (I can't see Scalia doing that, and I think Thomas would act similarly). I'm no US constitutional scholar, but my understanding of the First Amendment is that it wouldn't allow such uses of such a law unless the company's property rights were so badly affected that the infringement of free speech was justified. Given some of the previous decisions on freedom of speech, you'd pretty much need to be decimating the company's sales to have a solid case (at least, for domestic sites). That said, my understanding is that it wouldn't necessarily prevent someone from being liable for copyright infringements, and it may not prevent foreign sites from being shut down or rendered inaccessible from within the US.

Some of the other provisions - particularly regarding the "avoidance of confirmation" aspects of the Bill - are absolutely chilling. The protectionist elements of the Bill should have the low-regulation conservatives screaming (unless they're hypocrites). It's a potential job-killer, not just for media-based sites and organisations, but for prospective investors and existing tech companies (by creating the possibility of new and ill-defined commercial liabilities). The message that the Bill sends is antithetical to the concepts the internet promotes and the essential dynamics of a capitalist system. As much faith as I have in the justice system to resolve things appropriately, aspects of this Bill need to be removed (or voted down like a raise for company directors) and the thresholds for bringing actions under this Act need to be substantially raised.

PS: Just in case it got lost in the text... well said, Jim. Maintain the rage, because crap like this is exactly what any responsible government is supposed to prevent.

Therumancer:
First thing is first.

Jim, I don't know how much your acting for effect but I think you overdid it a bit this time as you seemed a little bit off your rocker and a little incoherant at times. You might want to sit back and try and re-record this message a bit calmer and elaborate a bit more.... also the whole "Streaming God Of War for Charity" thing was kind of "WTF" because honestly giving away someone elses game for a charity (which might not even be genuine despite what was claimed) would be pushing it.

I think by streaming he meant "playing it live like the Desert Bus crew," not "torrenting it."

AxelxGabriel:
I live in Canada, What exactly can I do to help?

Invade American.

Zachary Amaranth:

DisasterArea42:

Y'know, if it takes some exaggeration to point out the problem, he should go for it. The problem of this act is seriously dangerous for the internet as is. Companies would go crazy blocking sites left and right. Legislation like this shouldn't even be written. There are already copyright laws in place to punish the kind of things this act would be used to go after first. Piracy is a problem, but banning the internet isn't the way to stop it.

But fabricating a panic scenario simply makes him look like he's making shit up and undermines the problem.

But its not a panic scenario. This is literally what will happen. There's no fabrication, no lies, nothing
There is absolutely no way the industries involved in trying to make this a reality will not abuse it, because the way its written allows them to do everything he said they could and more.

Its not exaggerated and if you think corporations won't do this, then your naieve. We already see this in our own industry with EA testing the waters on digital consumer rights, which is small compared to the crap other industries get away with. Read up on it, instead of accusing Jim of spreading false information

sir.rutthed:
Whoa, hold the fuck up. The ESA supports this shit? What the fuck? After our big win earlier this year I thought those guys were the shit. Now it turns out they're just shit! The fuck?!

OT: Preach it brother! Call out those assholes! I'd just assumed all the publishers and industry groups were lining up against this shit, but I guess I was wrong. Fuck those assholes, and fuck this shitty legislation!

Don't know why, but I feel this is appropriate in a completely non ironic way.

But... how does it end? :(

Damnit!

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