Jimquisition: Sony, Nintendo, EA and SOPA

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SteelStallion:

CustomMagnum:

garjian:
How would this effect sites based elsewhere?

...couldnt you just move your business... somehow... if this only effects america?

Nope. The law also gives those corporations the ability to force an ISP to block sites with infringing content that come from outside the US.

Bullshit. America is passing a bill that lets it force companies in other countries to shut down their sites?

What a load of baloney. I could open a gameplay streaming website hosted internationally and they wouldn't be able to do fuck all about it.

They would be able to block anyone in the US from seeing it.

I'm in the UK and I can see how this would effect me, if there is anything I could do to actually impact the chances of this going through I really would. Are there petitions I can sign or something even though I'm in the UK?

Spaceparanoid42:

SkarKrow:
Sounds like something the chinese would pass.

Tell me about it. I could see this kind of censorship law being made in China or North Korea or something, but to have it being seriously considered in the USA is really appalling. Weren't we supposed to represent freedom and liberty? Why the hell are we about to pass something that goes so fundamentally against what we supposedly stand for? America has a lot of issues right now, but this... this is just disgusting.

I know right, I'm not an expert on american law or anything, I've never even been there let alone lived there but don't you guys have some consitution that american TV likes to bang on about or something? Y'know, that free speech thing which lets you say what you think of things and so on. Buggered if I know.

Limey man, away!

Ishigami:
I don't live in the USA so I don't give a fuck.

It has a far wider reaching audience than just the USA, I don't think you realise the implications involved if this bill goes through.

The way its worded now, all the Lets Play video's you might be watching... not allowed. The Mighty Hutch of Machina fame, not allowed, etc. etc.

Wow. There's a lot of these. I'm betting that we have a bunch of Washington lobbyists + lawyers who have "come to a common agreement about the best way to protect our clients" and are pushing these kinds of bills all over.

The subject has a solid sales pitch - "fight IP thievery", "protect your business" etc., and it will spawn a new billable for both lobbyists and the legal industry. Add in the "successes" of the RIAA (in which lots of lawyers got paid for suing lots of people who couldn't pay) and it becomes pretty clear that the main beneficiaries will be lobbyists and lawyers. Again.

SkarKrow:

Spaceparanoid42:

SkarKrow:
Sounds like something the chinese would pass.

Tell me about it. I could see this kind of censorship law being made in China or North Korea or something, but to have it being seriously considered in the USA is really appalling. Weren't we supposed to represent freedom and liberty? Why the hell are we about to pass something that goes so fundamentally against what we supposedly stand for? America has a lot of issues right now, but this... this is just disgusting.

I know right, I'm not an expert on american law or anything, I've never even been there let alone lived there but don't you guys have some consitution that american TV likes to bang on about or something? Y'know, that free speech thing which lets you say what you think of things and so on. Buggered if I know.

Limey man, away!

No, that's pretty much just about protesting government actions. You can't say anything bad about anyone else or any business or it's slander, libel or worse against you. And Fair Use has been under attack both via IP rights claims and via legal subterfuge (DMCA) so that media industries can resell the same content to you over and over at full price, even though your first purchase is supposed to transfer a license to view it in perpetuity.

So no, no such luck on the whole "rights" thing. This is more the Competing Assortment of Oligarchies than the United States of America these days.

Versuvius:
I'm just wondering. If this passes and everyone who hosts themselves in the US, hop country and host their servers elsewhere, how long it will take the US to flop its dick around and extend its big floppy juridstriction to other countries? And how long it will take them to be told to fuck right off.

Your penis metaphor burns my mind. Literally, upon reading this, a burning pain shot through my head.

Caramel Frappe:
.. Wait, wait... wait. Nintendo, Sony, and EA.. support this Bill?

image

Truly this is just filled with corruption. No company, no matter how much we've respected and admired them for years... will be fair in the long run if this bill passes. They'll take advantage of it till our eyes bleed, which in truth is literal because the censors shall sky rocket on ever little aspect that shows a trailer or some gameplay containing their game. Heck, they can even tamper with other company websites to limit competition. Not to mention it doesn't just affect gaming.. it affects shows, movies, books.. maybe even live events which can be censored online and more.

The bill itself shall ruin everything we know and love. We're not fools, this is serious (very serious). I can't believe those three game companies along with some others support this.. it's just disgraceful. They can take this website down since it's all about gaming with trailers and spoilers.. sites on Google will be stripped and worst part is- we can all become criminals for using one of their games even for a good cause. 5 years in prison... over something such as this. I'm disgusted, and I am honestly disappointed in ALL of you companies.

Good job Jim, I respect you for pointing this out. Let's make sure that bill stays down for good.

It does pretty much feel like this could destroy years of progress, doesn't it?

Strange that just as my life returns to a measure of peace the modern world seems to be putting a gun to its own head.

This is a knee jerk reaction laid down by EA, Nintendo and Sony!

This is dangerous not because of what has already been said by Jim. It can be a threat to reviewers as this can be held over the head of all sites... "GIVE US A GOOD REVIEW OR WE HAVE YOUR REVIEWER ARRESTED!"

Now I'm not saying Piracy is a good thing but as a tool it isn't bad, its the way the end user uses it (CORRUPTION can happen to anyone in a Free Market even the buyer) and I choose as a User not to use it.

Seriously though, this could backfire on anyone who uses the law... and benefit those against it... think about it, EA refuses streaming on all sites but Mojang turns around and on his site says "I wave my right to enforcement under the Stop Online Piracy Act." What would happen?

Well for starters Minecraft and other games he produces would get more streaming time. More people will see these games in action as players do gameplay videos of his games. Players will have the information required to make an informed choice to buy the game so more sales.

Secondly, depending on how strong EA uses the Stick, Reviewers may refuse to review games from EA and they can legally do this unless there is a long term contract involved.

Reviewers are supported if they tell the truth and with this law along with the 'Arrest' example they have two options...

1) protect themselves by lies about a game (ie it's good when it's not) and lose support of the gamers and actually die out due to users drifting away due to the lies.

2)Refuse to review the game and BAN EA games from the site permanently which in the short term would lose money but in the long term they will be stronger and supported by the gamers.

At the same time, if a total boycott of EA games occurs by all major trusted reviewers then EA would immediately have no-one reporting externally about their actions. The Hype Machine relied on by EA to get it's games bought would collapse and with it, possibly the company!

Thirdly the internet will adapt. It might sound weird but divide the internet in 2; those that would benefit from SOPA and those who would not... and then decide which side of the line all players would like to be on... Answer: with Facebook, Google etc. who believe in a free internet.

Taking three scenarios lets look at the internet post-SOPA. The internet will be stronger than ever with real debate, real choice (oh I'm sounding like a politician) and real chances for those who shun the SOPA act and allow their games (under a Fair Use Policy) to be shown by the people to the people. Those that glued their backsides to EA for the money will die out when the trust of the gamers are lost and those that don't will find themselves in a new age of gaming catering for gamers.

Critically the US government and EA will have failed in their tasks; EA would stop making money so would close and the US government will have failed to protect EA, the jobs they had and their reputation with it.

So let EA play with its new toy... they are betting 10,000 jobs on it!

I want to start by saying, I don't support his bill, but .... Please tell me one thing that is legal now that will not be legal if this bill passes?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fair_use
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stop_Online_Piracy_Act

Also show me where it says that a company will be able to act on its own. Also the bill is specifically targetting websites that our outside the US jurisdiction and it doesn't take them down it forbids US companies from paying a company for illegal activities.

The bill would authorize the U.S. Department of Justice to seek court orders against websites outside U.S. jurisdiction accused of infringing on copyrights, or of enabling or facilitating copyright infringement.[4] After delivering a court order, the U.S. Attorney-General (AG) could require US-directed Internet service providers, ad networks such as Google and payment processors such as Paypal or Visa to suspend doing business with sites found to infringe on federal criminal intellectual property laws and take "technically feasible and reasonable measures" to prevent access to the infringing site. The AG could also bar search engines from displaying links to the sites.[11]

So basically, This is a anti pirate bay bill.

The only part in the bill that really disturbs me is the fellony charges for streaming IP materials. It seems like that is a civil mater and that there is too much danger that a honest disagreement of fair use could then be considered a criminal rather than a civil issue. However, I believe we have lots and lots of law protecting free speech and fair use.

I would be willing to bet that the part of this bill that keeps it from being passable is exactly that.

Just thought I would remind people what a "company" is capable of with just a little legal muscle.

http://www.escapistmagazine.com/news/view/111112-U-K-Judge-Crushes-Tim-Langdell

This guy made a career on trademark infringement cases before he finally got smacked down.

Now if someone like EA or Sony had REAL legal muscle for trademark infringement...

And it's not just the game industry. This applies for Hollywood as well.

Wow, He finally addresses something that matters with a proper view on it. And acts like a two year old with a poopee in his diaper.

CustomMagnum:

garjian:
How would this effect sites based elsewhere?

...couldnt you just move your business... somehow... if this only effects america?

Nope. The law also gives those corporations the ability to force an ISP to block sites with infringing content that come from outside the US.

I think he may mean abandoning America and its censorship there and moving somewhere else, to work there, without censorship.

Versuvius:
I'm just wondering. If this passes and everyone who hosts themselves in the US, hop country and host their servers elsewhere, how long it will take the US to flop its dick around and extend its big floppy juridstriction to other countries? And how long it will take them to be told to fuck right off.

Too long. The problem with this idea is that the Americans are likely to get all shitty about it and someone is likely to give in. They've already pushed an anti-piracy law into New Zealand.

jacobythehedgehog:
Jim, you sounded like you were about to cry.... :'(. I for one would hate to see this bill pass. I like talking about gaming, and making gaming videos even more so then I like talking about video games. But this goes with everything. Watching clips of a Family Guy Episode like this listed below

this could be against the law.... ;'( so can this

I mean don't take this away. Ugg. wow this is such a touchy topic.

NOOOOOOOO ~ NO!!! MOTHER!!! DON'T MAKE ME GO BACK TO TV!~ NOOOOOO~ WTH? why would they do this to us? isn't it bad enough that we are clinching on to our daily jobs, to serve the great capitalist machine... breaking our backs, to earn shit wages... to come back to our home which we couldn't even spent weekends in (because I work in the weekends too... backward mortgage... go figures...), to lay our selves down in our work room, while firing up the "late night jobs" (i'm sure some of you have as well... like photo shop, vid/sound edit... ETC), stray off to some nice relaxing internet funnies, game news/reviews... (wait... did they want to pass this law so they can threat meta reviewers?) Web comics...Etc. DAMN THEM THE top 2% bastards/bastress, they are fed too well, and their appetites had gotten bigger, and now they want to cut in to ours, I hope they get what they deserve... uprise!

Therumancer:
First thing is first.

Jim, I don't know how much your acting for effect but I think you overdid it a bit this time as you seemed a little bit off your rocker and a little incoherant at times. You might want to sit back and try and re-record this message a bit calmer and elaborate a bit more.... also the whole "Streaming God Of War for Charity" thing was kind of "WTF" because honestly giving away someone elses game for a charity (which might not even be genuine despite what was claimed) would be pushing it.

That said, this bill *IS* really bad, and represents a lot of things that game and media companies have wanted to push for a long time, and it is really an Orwellian nightmare of a bill.

The issue with this is that by definition things like game reviews, let's plays, or even people doing FAQS for sites like Gamefaqs could also be considered violations. High traffic sites like Youtube which couldn't be effectively policed if they wanted to are pretty much doomed, and this is to say nothing of P2P services which do have legitimate uses other than piracy.

Strictly speaking a game company SHOULD have to go through the proper channels and specifically identify and chase down specific offenders as opposed to being able to decide "well Youtube has something we don't like, so let's lock it down". The issue of
course being that it's too time consuming and expensive to pursue things that way. Even verifying and pursueing a single case could take a lot of time and money, so it's easier to just shut down anything they find suspicious.

I'll also be blunt in saying that I think the current issues with Metacritic have a lot to do with this as well, albiet indirectly. Simply put, the game industry is realizing that while it can sway professional reviewers and ensure no product with a decent investment of cash gets lower than say an 8/10 rating in most cases, it can't do this reliably with specific users or independant reviewers who have no financial stake, not even so far as them being able to threaten to pull advertising revenues. Given that some popular reviewers on things like Youtube can pull truely massive numbers of hits, and actually do sway opinions, the gaming industry is doubtlessly also considering that they could shut these sources down. Someone like Whiteythereviewer, or Danae from Checkpoint Basement Level could get Youtube shut down as a whole just by showing footage from a game they are playing to illustrate a point.

I also know that there has been some talk fairly recently about the problem with online FAQS and walkthroughs, because game companies and cluebook publishers increasingly want to charge $20 or more for digital strategy guides, and really there is no point to buying a digital strategy guide when a month or two after the game comes out (tops) someone can just hop on Gamefaqs and find a guide there, or even find a dedicated wiki to the game in some cases. This bill could be used to basically shut down their competition here, and close every cheat/strategy site and fan page/database on the internet which I'm sure some bean counter is drooling about as I write this as they count digital cluebook sales figures in their heads.

This is a lot of stuff I'm talking about here, but the bottom line is that as I understand this, this is going to be a very bad thing. This law exists to basically circumvent the existing system because companies find it inconveinent to play by the rules.

Of course a lot of this also gets into intellectual property laws to begin with, and I think a lot of these problems started when they made them so tight knit for the owner of an IP. Technically according to the definition something like a FAQ should be illegal despite the long-term existance of such things... and that's part of the problem. When we're dealing with properties that are pure information (as opposed to say information used to make an actual product like a patent or copyright) I think there needs to be a lot of limitations put in place because there is more at stake than the information itself, but people's very freedom to communicate when you get down to it. In the case of IPs I think it's a problem when say China takes the formula for a drug like Viagra, makes an actual physical product using it, and then sells it. In this case though your pretty much saying that a picture of a game being used for review purposes, or even just text and descriptions talking about content in the game, could be considered theft. This is more akin to me telling someone that Viagra exists, or my experiences with the drug rather than stealing an actual, physical product. Games DO need to be protected from someone copying the entire thing and giving it away for free (or selling it) but this is far too inclusive to my understanding, and Jim is right that this law could shut down pretty much the entire internet gaming community, or at the very least turn it into a paranoid police state with everyone running a website being terrified to let anything be said for fear of being shut down. Just imagine a situation where a spoiler might not just ruin a bit of a game for someone, but actually be a felony because you've revealed protected information.

First up, excellent essay dude, but your last point really seems to emphasise that we need to make proper fair use laws that regard things such as this. Though, if we did, hey would be fucked up by the large companies with lots of money *sigh*

Cracker3011:
Huh, to plagiarize Jim, 'thank God... that Microsoft isn't in on this bill too.' At least ONE of the software giants realises this is a stupid idea.

And what worries me, is that the bill (correct me if I'm wrong) doesn't just limit companies to taking down US-hosted sites. If this goes through, it could possible allow companies FULL RIGHTS TO THE ENTIRE FUCKING INTERNET.

Again, correct me if I'm wrong, and I sure hope I am.

You're half wrong. They can block sites hosted offshore, say in Europe, from being viewed by americans, and they can stop American companies from giving them money, things like Paypaal and advertising revenue sources, like google. However, everyone else can still access the sites, just not Americans. The loss of American revenue would hurt the sites though, cause America is a largely online country.

Volf99:

Versuvius:
I'm just wondering. If this passes and everyone who hosts themselves in the US, hop country and host their servers elsewhere, how long it will take the US to flop its dick around and extend its big floppy juridstriction to other countries? And how long it will take them to be told to fuck right off.

well if you really wanted to go somewhere that doesn't give a f*ck about intellectual property rights, you could go to mainland China, lol. Seriously I don't think you would have any trouble over there as long as none of your videos say anything bad about the CCP.

Yes, except China is a horrible place to live. China censors the net anyway, but yeah, they probably encourage piracy, and god knows we've seen enough state-sponsored cyberattacks directed at everything from google to the pentagon.

CustomMagnum:

RJ Dalton:

CustomMagnum:

Thankfully Obama already said he would veto it if it does pass

That was the net neutrality bill. Last I heard, Obama supports this bill, but everybody seems to be saying who does and doesn't support this without any sources to back it up. So, unless you have a direct source saying Obama intends to veto both SOPA and PIPA, I'm going to assume he supports it.

... Wow, you're right. I could've sworn that I read that he was going to veto this, but now I can't find it for sure.

Still, I really can't see him supporting a bill that allows corporations to completely block and destroy websites without having to answer to everyone while at the same time being against a law that would allow corporations to pay money so that ISPs would block certain websites while making access to their sites faster.

I wouldn't see anyone with half a brain supporting this bill, but here we are, looking at this bill. It's a matter of money.

If any bill similar to this passes, I will seriously consider backing up all of what I love on the internet. America, don't do this to Canada. You do it and our government will fall right in line.

maxmanrules:

Volf99:

Versuvius:
I'm just wondering. If this passes and everyone who hosts themselves in the US, hop country and host their servers elsewhere, how long it will take the US to flop its dick around and extend its big floppy juridstriction to other countries? And how long it will take them to be told to fuck right off.

well if you really wanted to go somewhere that doesn't give a f*ck about intellectual property rights, you could go to mainland China, lol. Seriously I don't think you would have any trouble over there as long as none of your videos say anything bad about the CCP.

Yes, except China is a horrible place to live. China censors the net anyway, but yeah, they probably encourage piracy, and god knows we've seen enough state-sponsored cyberattacks directed at everything from google to the pentagon.

I was under the impression that Hong Kong is a nice place to live and given their history, I think it might be some what "free" of the CCP's rules.

I was first notified of this through Avaaz, and was not horrified enough, at first. I had to do a little bit of research to actually understand the situation, and I'm glad I did.
It's quite obvious that this would have catastrophic consequences, and I find it absolutely retarded that most of the people discussing it seem to have little or no technical understanding of the matter. To anyone who has any knowledge of the internet, it is immediately apparent how stupid this is.
I was happy to notice that the list of opposers includes such groups as the EFF and Wikimedia foundation, and Reporters without Borders and Human Rights Watch. This highlights not only the technical stupidity of the Act, but also the ethical stupidity, since all of these are non-profit organisations who are definitely well informed.

Of course, if it DOES pass, how are we to respond?
What can we do to work around or combat these new, stupid measures?

Wonkyth:
I was first notified of this through Avaaz, and was not horrified enough, at first. I had to do a little bit of research to actually understand the situation, and I'm glad I did.
It's quite obvious that this would have catastrophic consequences, and I find it absolutely retarded that most of the people discussing it seem to have little or no technical understanding of the matter. To anyone who has any knowledge of the internet, it is immediately apparent how stupid this is.
I was happy to notice that the list of opposers includes such groups as the EFF and Wikimedia foundation, and Reporters without Borders and Human Rights Watch. This highlights not only the technical stupidity of the Act, but also the ethical stupidity, since all of these are non-profit organisations who are definitely well informed.

Of course, if it DOES pass, how are we to respond?
What can we do to work around or combat these new, stupid measures?

create a host file?

*EDIT*
And before anyone asks what a host file is,
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hosts_file

InterAirplay:
These things always get better, true - but only if we don't take it for granted that they will.

Pfft, I was trying to be optimisitc about the affair. Protect IP too.

boyvirgo666:
They arent, numerous companies just keep trying to pass different bills for the same purpose, every one has been shot down because if they actually use these laws to do these idiotic acts alot of CEO's, congressmen, and other people who are involved will lose there jobs.

True, but I imagine if it does pass the Americans can repeal it for being non-constitutional.

Also, Jim? Put in a small link to your video before I started this week's blog. Hopefully anyone reading it will be made aware.

maxmanrules:
[First up, excellent essay dude, but your last point really seems to emphasise that we need to make proper fair use laws that regard things such as this. Though, if we did, hey would be fucked up by the large companies with lots of money *sigh*

Well, we need to change the laws in regards to purely intellectual properties to include more consumer protection. Right now the entire problem is that games exist in a sort of limbo where you are basically giving them money for the right to use something (a liscence) which they can revoke for any reason while keeping your money.

The reason why the laws were written that way was to prevent someone from buying a game and then saying they owned the entire game, and the people who made it can't sell it anymore because it's no theirs and there should only be one working version of it anywhere (theirs) because it was the product they bought.

Really the entire style of law was not conceived to begin with, with thigns like video games or the internet, or digital distribution in mind. Nor was anyone expecting it to be so heavily exploited by people playing games with contract law through EULAs or companies wanting to basically demand customers waive any and all reasonable protections in order to use their product.

I doubt it will happen in the near future, especially seeing as a lot of companies that like to play god would be "hurt", but the goverment DOES need to step in and create laws governing liscences and virtual properties that protect the consumer and actually give them ownership/full rights over, at least a single copy of a game. Then you can work from there.

I've also been of the opinion that things like MMOs and services that provide virtual goods should legally be required to be backed by a trust. That is to say a pile of money sufficient to pay for continued operations indefinatly through interest... sort of like what rich, irresponsible, kids get from their parents, where they can only withdraw so much money from the pile at one time based on how much it makes so they effectively have an inexhaustible pile of cash. Someone who invests a ton of money in say "league of legends" and then sees it go down loses all of their virtual property at that point, thus I feel to operate something like that a company should be required to ensure it's indefinate existance through having a trust sufficient to maintain servers and office space and an employee or two from now until well... the sun goes cold... it can actually be done. This would effectively make virtual property something fairly "real" which it should be if people are accepting money for it. Of course in reality I imagine this would just cause the collapse of virtual cash shops and the increasingly ridiculous "free to play" model.

I could say more on it, but it's increasingly irrelevent to reality. The bottom line is the current system sucks, I think a fair one could be created if anyone wanted to take the time. I suspect this kind of thing is probably going to be a hot button issue in years to come. As time goes on I imagine we might very well see politicians running on a platform of reforming virtual trade and working on creating such a system though.

Jim, Ayn Rand is proud of you.

w00tage:

SkarKrow:

Spaceparanoid42:

Tell me about it. I could see this kind of censorship law being made in China or North Korea or something, but to have it being seriously considered in the USA is really appalling. Weren't we supposed to represent freedom and liberty? Why the hell are we about to pass something that goes so fundamentally against what we supposedly stand for? America has a lot of issues right now, but this... this is just disgusting.

I know right, I'm not an expert on american law or anything, I've never even been there let alone lived there but don't you guys have some consitution that american TV likes to bang on about or something? Y'know, that free speech thing which lets you say what you think of things and so on. Buggered if I know.

Limey man, away!

No, that's pretty much just about protesting government actions. You can't say anything bad about anyone else or any business or it's slander, libel or worse against you. And Fair Use has been under attack both via IP rights claims and via legal subterfuge (DMCA) so that media industries can resell the same content to you over and over at full price, even though your first purchase is supposed to transfer a license to view it in perpetuity.

So no, no such luck on the whole "rights" thing. This is more the Competing Assortment of Oligarchies than the United States of America these days.

This is getting long but I'mn pretty new to quoting things ina forum so I dont really wanna mess with the syntax or whatever.

I see, Oligopolies are rather bad for everyone to be honest, if my A2 macroeconomics serves me well at least. But it really just means that in america people with money are really in charge of everything doesn't it? The glory of capitalism!

internet totalitarism, the unexpected horror.

Johnson McGee:
I don't understand why the American government would even consider letting this pants-on-head retarded bill pass. At the same time, where is the legislation that protects OUR privacy? Just today I had the Shazam app ask me 5 times back to back for access to my personal information. Pissed me off so much I uninstalled it right there.

Not to mention that the instant a law like this passes every server farm and web based business that could be affected will instantly move offshore to avoid the law and access to foreign websites from within the US will be severely restricted by ISPs fearing lawsuits. America's economy will take a huge hit from this if it passes and it will affect everyone else. I encourage any American citizens on this board to write your congress-person on this issue.

The reason why the government is trying some shit like this because of the lobbyist in DC putting money and ideas into their heads. They want something done so they'll bribe until it's heard by the majority. It overall undermines the voting processes the majority, the USERS don't get a vote at all. The vote goes to idiots that are too busy counting their money to really care.

Sadly I don't see this bill hurting bigger game companies all that much. So long as you're a sniveling little sycophant and praise every game you review with a generous 10 out of 10 and never speak ill of them then I'd surmise your website would be left unharmed (so long as a rival company doesn't get too pissed you're talking about a different game that is).

I would suspect that this would harm smaller devs who would have many larger companies shut down websites who are "violating" the IP rights of smaller companies that can't afford to police the internet as thoroughly as the larger ones can and so all of these smaller companies who do rely on word of mouth to get their games out their would be screwed.

Speak ill of Bioware? Deleted.
Speak ill of modern FPSs and their trends? Deleted.
Cry out for more meaningful and intelligent Sci-fi movies? Deleted.
Post an article about a game or movie from a smaller developer or director that could threaten to topple status quo? Deleted.

And sad thing is I can already see many fans of more mainstream games lining up with big "so what?" attitudes. I mean these are people who've probably had their tastes dictated to them from day one, so they don't care if games like Amnesia or Mine Craft can no longer compete with their Call of Duties and Battlefields. And since this IS America if we hear less and less about JRPGs and other Japanese games as companies like EA and Activision submit deletion after deletion for every article that speak well about them (on the altruistic behalf of their smaller Japanese competitors of course) then who would really shed a tear? After all JRPGs suck, it's like a fact, or something, so why should these people be allowed to share their opinions when they are clearly wrong? Go play Mass Effect and Call of Duty and never speak ill of them or else.

Big brother is watching.

Thanks Jim.

WOW... this is the first I've heard of this. really glad you did this vid. Now to figure out how I can help stop this... TO THE INTERNET !!!!

Volf99:

maxmanrules:

Volf99:

well if you really wanted to go somewhere that doesn't give a f*ck about intellectual property rights, you could go to mainland China, lol. Seriously I don't think you would have any trouble over there as long as none of your videos say anything bad about the CCP.

Yes, except China is a horrible place to live. China censors the net anyway, but yeah, they probably encourage piracy, and god knows we've seen enough state-sponsored cyberattacks directed at everything from google to the pentagon.

I was under the impression that Hong Kong is a nice place to live and given their history, I think it might be some what "free" of the CCP's rules.

Interestingly enough, Hong Kong is technically not Chinese. When the British handed it over to China it was stipulated it remain independent (sort of anyway) and that they have their own laws, parliament and money. It's also separated from mainland China (which is what the poster was talking about)

Therumancer:

maxmanrules:
[First up, excellent essay dude, but your last point really seems to emphasise that we need to make proper fair use laws that regard things such as this. Though, if we did, hey would be fucked up by the large companies with lots of money *sigh*

Well, we need to change the laws in regards to purely intellectual properties to include more consumer protection. Right now the entire problem is that games exist in a sort of limbo where you are basically giving them money for the right to use something (a liscence) which they can revoke for any reason while keeping your money.

The reason why the laws were written that way was to prevent someone from buying a game and then saying they owned the entire game, and the people who made it can't sell it anymore because it's no theirs and there should only be one working version of it anywhere (theirs) because it was the product they bought.

Really the entire style of law was not conceived to begin with, with thigns like video games or the internet, or digital distribution in mind. Nor was anyone expecting it to be so heavily exploited by people playing games with contract law through EULAs or companies wanting to basically demand customers waive any and all reasonable protections in order to use their product.

I doubt it will happen in the near future, especially seeing as a lot of companies that like to play god would be "hurt", but the goverment DOES need to step in and create laws governing liscences and virtual properties that protect the consumer and actually give them ownership/full rights over, at least a single copy of a game. Then you can work from there.

I've also been of the opinion that things like MMOs and services that provide virtual goods should legally be required to be backed by a trust. That is to say a pile of money sufficient to pay for continued operations indefinatly through interest... sort of like what rich, irresponsible, kids get from their parents, where they can only withdraw so much money from the pile at one time based on how much it makes so they effectively have an inexhaustible pile of cash. Someone who invests a ton of money in say "league of legends" and then sees it go down loses all of their virtual property at that point, thus I feel to operate something like that a company should be required to ensure it's indefinate existance through having a trust sufficient to maintain servers and office space and an employee or two from now until well... the sun goes cold... it can actually be done. This would effectively make virtual property something fairly "real" which it should be if people are accepting money for it. Of course in reality I imagine this would just cause the collapse of virtual cash shops and the increasingly ridiculous "free to play" model.

I could say more on it, but it's increasingly irrelevent to reality. The bottom line is the current system sucks, I think a fair one could be created if anyone wanted to take the time. I suspect this kind of thing is probably going to be a hot button issue in years to come. As time goes on I imagine we might very well see politicians running on a platform of reforming virtual trade and working on creating such a system though.

Yeah, I mean look at what happened to Star Trek online, which has completely bombed out and gotten totally screwed. New Zealand is slightly better than America about this stuff, and so are lots of European countries, which don't seem to like the fact that companies can sell something broken and then force the user to waive their rights BEFORE they can tell whether it is broken or not. The problem is most anyone in government has no real idea about copyright or IP, not in a sense related to internet, in fact many profess their ignorance when voting about such topis (but they vote anyway, and make the stupid vote. Retards) And so they really don't care about such things, cause they do not affect them awfully. Most gamers are fairly young, a large proportion being under voting age, which blocks off their views(not saying EVERYONE is, but a fair few) and it may take many years before balance is achieved, but some retarded version of SOPA or Protect IP is going to be passed before that by people who don't know and are only informed by those with big pockets.

maxmanrules:

Volf99:

maxmanrules:

Yes, except China is a horrible place to live. China censors the net anyway, but yeah, they probably encourage piracy, and god knows we've seen enough state-sponsored cyberattacks directed at everything from google to the pentagon.

I was under the impression that Hong Kong is a nice place to live and given their history, I think it might be some what "free" of the CCP's rules.

Interestingly enough, Hong Kong is technically not Chinese. When the British handed it over to China it was stipulated it remain independent (sort of anyway) and that they have their own laws, parliament and money. It's also separated from mainland China (which is what the poster was talking about)

that maybe true but I don't think that they are aloud to criticize the CCP.

Hmm...I'm torn. On the one hand, Obama is filthy commie scum...but on the other hand he promised to veto the bill. I just don't know what to think. -_-

What I do know is that if there's anything I despise as much as a corrupt government, it's a business that gets in bed with the corrupt government to gain an unfair advantage in the market.

Really, this bill cannot stand. What the entertainment industry profits from is the ability to supply product in the face of scarcity. Scarcity they enforce by making them the only place to get it. The internet has been the market's way of dissolving scarcity, and making available to everyone a market good. Why in the holy hell should we willingly support a law that promotes scarcity to the benefit of only a select few in the industry? It's not just against the free market, it's also blatently immoral.

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