Game of the Year 2011

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Game of the Year 2011

Check out our pick The Escapist's Game of the Year!

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Before I opened the article, I just knew you were going to keep praising Skyrim as the best game ever made, despite its numerous flaws (among them not one but two bad ports and the bugs in all three versions.) Either I'm psychic or every single game critic ever thinks that Plan 9 from Outer Space couldn't possibly be a better movie.

Greg Says: There is no wrong way to play Bethesda's fifth Elder Scrolls game

Sure there is: On a PS3!

But in all seriousness this was a good article. Also, good call on TOR. Also glad to see InFamous 2 get some love.

That was fuckin' predictable. I was really hoping you guys would surprise me on this one.

I honestly haven't played most of these games - been too busy with my backlog this year, as well as a bunch of other old games I bought new - but of the ones I've played, I agree entirely. Deus Ex: Human Revolution was a very worthy sequel to the original, with the advantage of an actually good storyline this time round, and Portal 2 was very similar, in that it somehow lived up to the first. Skyrim was... well, bloody Skyrim - but I'm an Elder Scrolls fanboy anyway, so my vision may be warped a bit - and MineCraft is a fun game, even if it lost its appeal for me.

leet_x1337:
Before I opened the article, I just knew you were going to keep praising Skyrim as the best game ever made, despite its numerous flaws (among them not one but two bad ports and the bugs in all three versions.) Either I'm psychic or every single game critic ever thinks that Plan 9 from Outer Space couldn't possibly be a better movie.

Because Azura forbid that a game has flaws! What's your favourite game, by the way, so we can poke a million and one holes in that? OK, fine. You hate it. Well done, your opinion is obviously better than everyone else's. Have a bloody sticker.

Fairly predictable, nice to see Minecraft in that list. I can't wait for the ZP version of this.

SilverUchiha:
That was fuckin' predictable. I was really hoping you guys would surprise me on this one.

Wait wait, you were waiting for a surprise when Skyrim was a contender? Talk about gearing for disappointment.

Predictable. Oh so predictable. And next year it's Diablo 3.

Prediction for this thread:
"whine, my favorite game was too far down on the list, you are all wrong"
"Minecraft is so overhyped and everyone who likes it is a tool. It has been out since 09 so it shouldn't even be here. Mojang are lazy bastards and therfore this sucks"
"why does everyone keep praising Skyrim, that was like, TWO months ago, get over it. It's because of your useless critcs that arrow to the knee jokes still lives"

In all seriousness, great list, worthy winner and worthy competitors, let's hope 2012 can top 11.

I predict Bastion 2 or Bioshock 3 for GOTY 2012.

Once again, the game my PS3 refuses to play wins a GOTY award.

Honestly, as good as the game COULD be, I still think that if the damn game is so broken on my system of choice that it is unplayable, it should be disqualified. I feel giving it the HIGHEST PRAISE OF THE YEAR and saying EVERY COMPANY should strive for that same "excellent" level of quality is a disservice to all those people that made, well, a playable, functional, mostly-problem free FINISHED game.

As it stands, Skyrim, yes, is a good game at heart... but it's still an incomplete, poorly tested, technical mess of a game that goes beyond being "buggy" to being outright "broken" for many people, even now, nearly two months after we paid them full priced for it.

I shouldn't have to wait two months for my "game of the year" to realize its potential, especially when so many other quality games out there were far better made, more technically proficient, and the customers and fans treated with a lot more respect. Sorry, Skyrim, but not even arrow to the knee jokes means you deserve the highest gaming honors a website can give... not until I can PLAY the damn game, at least.

D: I was really rooting for Bastion.

Surely predictable is good for a Game of the Year? The best game with the most hype and the biggest following,, that the most people play and get hooked to is surely going to win... If something else does, then isn't that odd...? Its like the Kings Speech, when that came out it was obviously going to win at the oscars, so when it did... It's not a surprise!

Why should the writers and editors pick a game they didn't enjoy as much just to please the people who 'want to be surprised by game of the year results?'

This is the reason why I never cared much for GOTY awards popularity contests. Dragon Age 2, the sequel to the worst game I ever had to force myself to finish (which from play the demo and what I've heard, DA2 is even worse than DA:O) gets "honorable mention", while my three favorite games of the year (Rage, Duke Nukem Forever, and Bulletstorm) are no where on the list. Oh well, not like the awards make the games better or anything, I still get to have my fun with games that I actually enjoy.

yeah the job pretty easy. Good game good results. on another note. BARF all over infamous 2 to think it was a contender ew.

Minecraft is so over---

Varya:
"Minecraft is so overhyped and everyone who likes it is a tool. It has been out since 09 so it shouldn't even be here. Mojang are lazy bastards and therfore this sucks"

Well then....neverminded. :P

But to everyone saying "So predictable god damnit!" come on, did you honestly believe that this or any other panel judging Best Game of 2011 would declare anything but Skyrim as the #1 game? If you did believe that some other game was picked, it's time to stop wearing those sunglasses while you're inside, give away your Starbucks gift-cards, and find something to do other than talking about how everything you've ever loved has in one way or another sold-out.

I mean come on...how many games this year feature mods that allow you to chase around Dr. Zoidberg after he scuttles out of a river bed? Or have you be saved from getting your head chopped off thanks to the timely arrival of a fire-breathing Macho Man Randy Savage (seriously, when you first hear that whisper echoing through the air at the beginning of that video...gets me laughing every time)? Or let you enjoy having your companions being launched into orbit thanks to the local giant's cudgel-based space program?

Skyrim does have its flaws, as someone else posted: all games do. The game is absolutely massive, so of course there's going to be some issues to iron out. The thing is that the game's goodness so vastly outweighs the bugs/problems that people STILL keep playing it for hours on end despite a backwards-flying dragon warping around, or the fact that every time I fast-travel somewhere there's ALWAYS a dead horse laying in front of me when I arrive at my destination, leaving me to wonder if my Khajiit is some kind of psycho who blacks out and kills livestock with no memory of the event.

Assassin Xaero:
This is the reason why I never cared much for GOTY awards popularity contests. Dragon Age 2, the sequel to the worst game I ever had to force myself to finish (which from play the demo and what I've heard, DA2 is even worse than DA:O) gets "honorable mention", while my three favorite games of the year (Rage, Duke Nukem Forever, and Bulletstorm) are no where on the list. Oh well, not like the awards make the games better or anything, I still get to have my fun with games that I actually enjoy.

Those are all the same style of game play and notoriously considered bad games in the gaming community. This website in particular and its fan base has a huge calling against cheap flashy games that are pushed out onto shelves. I don't see how you could ever except otherwise. Of course it's a popularity contest. Good things win contests. If your personal favorite lost then aw shucks.

We can't demand better quality from our gaming industry, and then give something with significantly less technical quality such unilateral praise. PS3 users can't even play it, dragons fly backwards, people shoot into the sky, quest givers disappear, but hey, as long as it's got a lot of stuff to do in it, it's awesome. Bugs are enough to take down games like Dead Island, but it's a good thing they're promptly ignored here.

It still boggles my mind that Dragon Age 2 made it anywhere near this list, I don't find the characters or story good at all, but that's personal, but there are so many things that are just simply wrong with the gameplay and design that it should not make any top 10 list

Assassin Xaero:
This is the reason why I never cared much for GOTY awards popularity contests. Dragon Age 2, the sequel to the worst game I ever had to force myself to finish (which from play the demo and what I've heard, DA2 is even worse than DA:O) gets "honorable mention", while my three favorite games of the year (Rage, Duke Nukem Forever, and Bulletstorm) are no where on the list. Oh well, not like the awards make the games better or anything, I still get to have my fun with games that I actually enjoy.

We can all whine and moan about our favorite (insert contest subject here) isn't on some Top 10 list or something. One key thing I would remind you to keep in mind is quite simply no matter what the case, this is all based on someone's opinion. And indeed: opinions are like assholes, everyone's got one.

My point is you say you don't care about such things, but you certainly do protest when your personal favorites aren't mentioned. I'd suggest you do what you apparently always do: not care about these people's opinion.

But for the record, Rage was a great and fun game, but good god was it WAY too short and ended whiplash-inducingly too abruptly. The argument is that the ending sets up for a sequel, even so: that ending was just god-awful. I rented it, had my fun, and was ready to take it back in a couple days.

DN: F was only fun if you kept one thing in mind: This is a Duke Nukem game. There's going to be breast jokes, poop jokes, and over-all a rather immature sense of humor, just like DN: 3D. The problem is that after 13 years, people were expecting a lot more than just another DN: 3D game, which is basically what DN: F equated to, just with a couple more bells and whistles. Again, a game that I rented and did have fun with, but I laughed at anyone foolish enough to actually buy this game.

Never actually played Bullet Storm, so I'm in no position to say anything about it.

As for Dragon Age 2, I'll admit it's far from an ideal game. The fact that they literally copy-pasted every. single. dungeon. in that game over and over was depressingly lame and made it get very old. However, I do think that the merits the critic pointed out in the article are true: it has a great combat system and a very fun method of story telling.

The over all point of me giving these critiques is that the 3 games you've mentioned, by and far, are rental-worthy games. Something you pick up, have fun for a few days, then take back and trade in. I'd imagine one very important thing to consider when determining a "Game of the Year" list is "Was this a game that people actually wanted to go out and buy? Or did they rent it, beat it in a weekend, and despite enjoying it, decide that they were done with it?"

Keep in mind, though, that these are just my opinions. No need to get upset about someone thinking differently than you. No one will ever be able to take away the fact that you like the games you like.

I'm disappointed that Skyrim is the game of the year.
It's a really nice game, but there are to many flaws that bug you all the time, bad design decisions and the long distance traveling that makes you forget that you have Skyrim on because you just pressed the auto-walk button.

"Skyrim is a great game", fine, it's on my "one day" list, but... would it have been GOTY had it come out in Feb? [esp if, say, TOR had also been released a little earlier...]

(The same question of all games/movies/etc that win when they are released near the award date...)

Ahhhh...no Call of Duty in sight...

Seriously though, that game was pretty much the Transformers 3 of video games. No way should it ever be nominated for anything, except whatever the games industry has that equates to the Golden Raspberry's.

SirBryghtside:

leet_x1337:
Before I opened the article, I just knew you were going to keep praising Skyrim as the best game ever made, despite its numerous flaws (among them not one but two bad ports and the bugs in all three versions.) Either I'm psychic or every single game critic ever thinks that Plan 9 from Outer Space couldn't possibly be a better movie.

Because Azura forbid that a game has flaws! What's your favourite game, by the way, so we can poke a million and one holes in that? OK, fine. You hate it. Well done, your opinion is obviously better than everyone else's. Have a bloody sticker.

Guess what? Skryim is so praised by everyone there's no way future historians will see it the same way as the gaming press and critics these days. Just like Duke Nukem Forever was panned mostly due to 12 years of excessive media-generated hype and didn't hold up, Skyrim won't hold up in future generations due to the excessive fan- and critic-generated hype right now.

The fact that Portal 2 only got a "special mention" totally destroyed any credibility this article had.

It's been a bad, bad year for gaming.

SirBryghtside:
I honestly haven't played most of these games - been too busy with my backlog this year, as well as a bunch of other old games I bought new - but of the ones I've played, I agree entirely. Deus Ex: Human Revolution was a very worthy sequel to the original, with the advantage of an actually good storyline this time round, and Portal 2 was very similar, in that it somehow lived up to the first. Skyrim was... well, bloody Skyrim - but I'm an Elder Scrolls fanboy anyway, so my vision may be warped a bit - and MineCraft is a fun game, even if it lost its appeal for me.

leet_x1337:
Before I opened the article, I just knew you were going to keep praising Skyrim as the best game ever made, despite its numerous flaws (among them not one but two bad ports and the bugs in all three versions.) Either I'm psychic or every single game critic ever thinks that Plan 9 from Outer Space couldn't possibly be a better movie.

Because Azura forbid that a game has flaws! What's your favourite game, by the way, so we can poke a million and one holes in that? OK, fine. You hate it. Well done, your opinion is obviously better than everyone else's. Have a bloody sticker.

Having a game-breaking issue on the PS3 is more than a nitpick.

Skyrim won...


Nothing this year got anywhere near the amount of praise and hype as Skyrim, to me a GOTY title isn't necessarily the best game made that year, it's the game that [I[characterizes[/I] that year, and honestly, I can't really think of a game that coloured our view of 2011 quite like Skyrim.

leet_x1337:

SirBryghtside:

leet_x1337:
Before I opened the article, I just knew you were going to keep praising Skyrim as the best game ever made, despite its numerous flaws (among them not one but two bad ports and the bugs in all three versions.) Either I'm psychic or every single game critic ever thinks that Plan 9 from Outer Space couldn't possibly be a better movie.

Because Azura forbid that a game has flaws! What's your favourite game, by the way, so we can poke a million and one holes in that? OK, fine. You hate it. Well done, your opinion is obviously better than everyone else's. Have a bloody sticker.

Guess what? Skryim is so praised by everyone there's no way future historians will see it the same way as the gaming press and critics these days. Just like Duke Nukem Forever was panned mostly due to 12 years of excessive media-generated hype and didn't hold up, Skyrim won't hold up in future generations due to the excessive fan- and critic-generated hype right now.

There are two possible ways Skyrim could be remembered - as Oblivion, a game released to hype that outweighed its quality... or as Morrowind, a game whose other quality overcame its somewhat fiddly nature.

The fact of the matter is that Skyrim came out in very good condition. PS3 slowdown bugs aside, the bugs-per-hour in Skyrim is comparable to many other high-profile games (Red Dead Redemption comes to mind), and the value of the game far outweighs its flaws. It will not be remembered for its flaws, soon modded and patched to Oblivion; rather, it will be remembered for its coherence of vision, its audacity of achievement. And this, despite your pessimism, is More a win(d) for the future of gaming than a perfect, smaller game could ever be.

For all mediums are borne forwards on imperfect works, works which stretch beyond their reach, sometimes failing, but all the more beautiful for it when they succeed. Why should gaming be different? Why should games like Skyrim be weighed down by (exaggerated accounts of) bugs and flaws when they have a chance to carry the medium to a brighter tomorrow?

omicron1:

leet_x1337:

SirBryghtside:
Because Azura forbid that a game has flaws! What's your favourite game, by the way, so we can poke a million and one holes in that? OK, fine. You hate it. Well done, your opinion is obviously better than everyone else's. Have a bloody sticker.

Guess what? Skryim is so praised by everyone there's no way future historians will see it the same way as the gaming press and critics these days. Just like Duke Nukem Forever was panned mostly due to 12 years of excessive media-generated hype and didn't hold up, Skyrim won't hold up in future generations due to the excessive fan- and critic-generated hype right now.

There are two possible ways Skyrim could be remembered - as Oblivion, a game released to hype that outweighed its quality... or as Morrowind, a game whose other quality overcame its somewhat fiddly nature.

The fact of the matter is that Skyrim came out in very good condition. PS3 slowdown bugs aside, the bugs-per-hour in Skyrim is comparable to many other high-profile games (Red Dead Redemption comes to mind), and the value of the game far outweighs its flaws. It will not be remembered for its flaws, soon modded and patched to Oblivion; rather, it will be remembered for its coherence of vision, its audacity of achievement. And this, despite your pessimism, is More a win(d) for the future of gaming than a perfect, smaller game could ever be.

For all mediums are borne forwards on imperfect works, works which stretch beyond their reach, sometimes failing, but all the more beautiful for it when they succeed. Why should gaming be different? Why should games like Skyrim be weighed down by (exaggerated accounts of) bugs and flaws when they have a chance to carry the medium to a brighter tomorrow?

Nice post there, Shakespeare. Here's the thing: you misunderstood me.

Games are allowed to have flaws, even major flaws. I wasn't saying otherwise. Hell, Mirror's Edge is one of my favourite games ever, despite the amount of sodding trial and error. Thing is, with everyone glossing over Skyrim's flaws, people will come to expect that it's a flawless game, and it's not what they'll get. It's what happened to Duke Nukem Forever last year: twelve years of hype for a game that hardly delivered on any of it.

Besides, major flaws ought to at least take a whole point off a game rated out of ten. Mirror's Edge caught that for its trial and error, Serious Sam 3 for its lack of changes from the original, so why is Skyrim's inability to run on most PS3s, the fact that patches made it worse and that "necessary" mods can't be used by two-thirds of its players being glossed over?

Assassin Xaero:
This is the reason why I never cared much for GOTY awards popularity contests. Dragon Age 2, the sequel to the worst game I ever had to force myself to finish (which from play the demo and what I've heard, DA2 is even worse than DA:O) gets "honorable mention", while my three favorite games of the year (Rage, Duke Nukem Forever, and Bulletstorm) are no where on the list. Oh well, not like the awards make the games better or anything, I still get to have my fun with games that I actually enjoy.

Surely you jest! Greg Tito, the one who reviewed it for this site and the one who put it up as the first item on the first page reckons that it's the Pinnacle of RPG's!

Ok, You must be kidding. DN:F was never going to make a GOTY list, ever. Given it's 14 year development time and it's lack of magical powers, it's a failure on every single level of gaming.

I'm sad. I haven't played most of those games, but I really want to and have many of them on my computer ready to be played. Damn you backlog! Will you never shrink?!

leet_x1337:

omicron1:

leet_x1337:

Guess what? Skryim is so praised by everyone there's no way future historians will see it the same way as the gaming press and critics these days. Just like Duke Nukem Forever was panned mostly due to 12 years of excessive media-generated hype and didn't hold up, Skyrim won't hold up in future generations due to the excessive fan- and critic-generated hype right now.

There are two possible ways Skyrim could be remembered - as Oblivion, a game released to hype that outweighed its quality... or as Morrowind, a game whose other quality overcame its somewhat fiddly nature.

The fact of the matter is that Skyrim came out in very good condition. PS3 slowdown bugs aside, the bugs-per-hour in Skyrim is comparable to many other high-profile games (Red Dead Redemption comes to mind), and the value of the game far outweighs its flaws. It will not be remembered for its flaws, soon modded and patched to Oblivion; rather, it will be remembered for its coherence of vision, its audacity of achievement. And this, despite your pessimism, is More a win(d) for the future of gaming than a perfect, smaller game could ever be.

For all mediums are borne forwards on imperfect works, works which stretch beyond their reach, sometimes failing, but all the more beautiful for it when they succeed. Why should gaming be different? Why should games like Skyrim be weighed down by (exaggerated accounts of) bugs and flaws when they have a chance to carry the medium to a brighter tomorrow?

Nice post there, Shakespeare. Here's the thing: you misunderstood me.

Games are allowed to have flaws, even major flaws. I wasn't saying otherwise. Hell, Mirror's Edge is one of my favourite games ever, despite the amount of sodding trial and error. Thing is, with everyone glossing over Skyrim's flaws, people will come to expect that it's a flawless game, and it's not what they'll get. It's what happened to Duke Nukem Forever last year: twelve years of hype for a game that hardly delivered on any of it.

Besides, major flaws ought to at least take a whole point off a game rated out of ten. Mirror's Edge caught that for its trial and error, Serious Sam 3 for its lack of changes from the original, so why is Skyrim's inability to run on most PS3s, the fact that patches made it worse and that "necessary" mods can't be used by two-thirds of its players being glossed over?

Skyrim's bugs aren't being glossed over. You seem to take exception to its winning game of the year, somehow believing that its bugs disqualify it... but you miss something important: It wins game of the year despite its bugs. Skyrim, with its bugs taken into account, is still the best game out there this year for a great many people.
Yes, the PS3 has issues right now. Bethsoft has been vetted on this point and it appears they did not pull a Kerberos - they did not realize the extent of this issue; they did not shove an unfinished product out the door intentionally. And even taking the PS3 into account, it's still the best game this year on at least 2/3 of the major platforms.

As an additional point, why are you complaining about mods? Skyrim is rated on its current potential, not its future potential. The PC build will get mods, but there are no mods necessary for play, and Skyrim wins GOTY based on its modless state. Mods will, however, transform Skyrim from its current excellent self into the biggest thing running on PC for the next four or so years straight. This is one of the main selling points for the PC, and I don't see how you can justify complaining that the closed-system consoles won't get the mods. That's the bloody point.

Look, I am approaching this whole thing from the viewpoint of a programmer. I know exactly how hard it is to weed every bug out of a simple calculator, let alone a game, let alone this game. And quite frankly, they deserve a pass, and a huge pat on the back for making it as far as they did. Same with the patching process - when you have to put out new code every few weeks, things sometimes slip. In all likelihood, the single big case of degradation everyone noted - backwards dragons - was a simple result of a last-minute change before the thing went out the door. What you seem to be missing is that patching is even more of an iterative process than development, somewhat equivalent to getting the wrinkles out of a bedsheed - each tug gets some, but causes others, and it takes many tugs before the thing is perfectly smooth.

I think you made some excellent choices. Listed a lot of good games. There quite a few I haven't played but have been meaning to. Damn 2 jobs.

I'm glad to see that there's more then a handful of people who liked DA2. It was a different animal compared to the first. Still a good game.

This was too predictable, and why wasn't Batman: AC a nominee? Skyrim was great though, but I personally preferred other games, such as Batman, Deus Ex, Saints Row 3, Gears 3, Rage, Bulletstorm, Driver: San Francisco... O.k there were a lot of games I preferred to Skyrim, but Skyrim was still great. Skyrim was a pretty popular choice by people for game of the year, so I can see why it was number 1.

omicron1:

leet_x1337:

omicron1:

There are two possible ways Skyrim could be remembered - as Oblivion, a game released to hype that outweighed its quality... or as Morrowind, a game whose other quality overcame its somewhat fiddly nature.

The fact of the matter is that Skyrim came out in very good condition. PS3 slowdown bugs aside, the bugs-per-hour in Skyrim is comparable to many other high-profile games (Red Dead Redemption comes to mind), and the value of the game far outweighs its flaws. It will not be remembered for its flaws, soon modded and patched to Oblivion; rather, it will be remembered for its coherence of vision, its audacity of achievement. And this, despite your pessimism, is More a win(d) for the future of gaming than a perfect, smaller game could ever be.

For all mediums are borne forwards on imperfect works, works which stretch beyond their reach, sometimes failing, but all the more beautiful for it when they succeed. Why should gaming be different? Why should games like Skyrim be weighed down by (exaggerated accounts of) bugs and flaws when they have a chance to carry the medium to a brighter tomorrow?

Nice post there, Shakespeare. Here's the thing: you misunderstood me.

Games are allowed to have flaws, even major flaws. I wasn't saying otherwise. Hell, Mirror's Edge is one of my favourite games ever, despite the amount of sodding trial and error. Thing is, with everyone glossing over Skyrim's flaws, people will come to expect that it's a flawless game, and it's not what they'll get. It's what happened to Duke Nukem Forever last year: twelve years of hype for a game that hardly delivered on any of it.

Besides, major flaws ought to at least take a whole point off a game rated out of ten. Mirror's Edge caught that for its trial and error, Serious Sam 3 for its lack of changes from the original, so why is Skyrim's inability to run on most PS3s, the fact that patches made it worse and that "necessary" mods can't be used by two-thirds of its players being glossed over?

Skyrim's bugs aren't being glossed over. You seem to take exception to its winning game of the year, somehow believing that its bugs disqualify it... but you miss something important: It wins game of the year despite its bugs. Skyrim, with its bugs taken into account, is still the best game out there this year for a great many people.
Yes, the PS3 has issues right now. Bethsoft has been vetted on this point and it appears they did not pull a Kerberos - they did not realize the extent of this issue; they did not shove an unfinished product out the door intentionally. And even taking the PS3 into account, it's still the best game this year on at least 2/3 of the major platforms.

As an additional point, why are you complaining about mods? Skyrim is rated on its current potential, not its future potential. The PC build will get mods, but there are no mods necessary for play, and Skyrim wins GOTY based on its modless state. Mods will, however, transform Skyrim from its current excellent self into the biggest thing running on PC for the next four or so years straight. This is one of the main selling points for the PC, and I don't see how you can justify complaining that the closed-system consoles won't get the mods. That's the bloody point.

Look, I am approaching this whole thing from the viewpoint of a programmer. I know exactly how hard it is to weed every bug out of a simple calculator, let alone a game, let alone this game. And quite frankly, they deserve a pass, and a huge pat on the back for making it as far as they did. Same with the patching process - when you have to put out new code every few weeks, things sometimes slip. In all likelihood, the single big case of degradation everyone noted - backwards dragons - was a simple result of a last-minute change before the thing went out the door. What you seem to be missing is that patching is even more of an iterative process than development, somewhat equivalent to getting the wrinkles out of a bedsheed - each tug gets some, but causes others, and it takes many tugs before the thing is perfectly smooth.

Here's the thing about the bugs: Bethesda have been doing this for, what, 18 years now? 19? Even though their games are bloody huge, you'd think they'd have enough experience with bloody huge games to not still be leaving bugs in a lot of the nooks and crannies. Like a hotel maid who's been making beds all her life, but still leaves creases, borrowing your metaphor for a bit. In that case, she's probably pretty old and short-sighted, but means well and the hotel has large beds that a lot of people find comfortable, so they have enough money to keep her on their staff.

I'll give Skyrim points for being big and ambitious, but nowhere near as many as Oblivion - it was made to a spec of consoles that was only just being released, and Skyrim's design doc (as far as I can see) was "take Oblivion and make it into the game the fans also made it into several years earlier." I can also see your position of Skyrim being GOTY despite its flaws - thing is, a lot of people (mostly fans) prefer to pretend they aren't there. Period. If you had any issues with the game, your PC must not be up to spec, your console is modded and that's having adverse effects, etc. I suppose it's the fans who overhype the game to future historians that are really doing it in more than the large magazines calling it their game of the year. Like I said, Duke Nukem Forever had that effect on current "historians."

I'm already probably going to hate the game when my package from New Zealand finally arrives, again most likely more the fault of the hype than the game in a vacuum. And just like Oblivion before it, I've only ever heard unconditional praise or absolute hatred about the game and I don't except to fall straight in the middle. Just like Oblivion before it, though, I'll still give the game applause for trying, and lament the fact that I can't enjoy the same games you do. For now, it's probably safer for me to keep having a low expectation:

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