Jimquisition: Welcoming A Digital Future

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Kumagawa Misogi:

FelixG:

RoseArch:
Sorry, Jim, but it isn't quite that simple. A fully digital future is a dire one indeed, because I doubt that even in fifty years, the entire world will have access to an internet that allows them to download gigabytes upon gigabytes. Or to hardware that will store that amount. Cloud gaming? Again, requires a good internet and constant internet connection. As it stands, gaming will have to go the way of music where the market is half hard copy and half digital. That is a good future.

If you don't think that we will have that kind of computer science in 50 years you obviously have no idea how much advancement we have made in the last 50.

as an example this is what we had 50 years ago

you want to know what can out compute that?

We have come a long way, in 50 years we would likely not even recognize what the fuck was going on if we were able to look at it today.

We are approaching the end of increasing computer power now and will probably max it inside the decade.

An example of a technology dead end you say? in atmosphere manned flight speed.

1903 wright brothers first powered manned flight speed 6.82mph

1967 North American X-15 4,519mph

64 years difference between the two and yet 45 years later NO progress.

... You're forgetting something... You remember the space shuttle? Did you know that would descend from orbit with help from the atmosphere at an initial entry speed of well over 15,000 MPH! And when the Apollo missions returned from the moon they would be going at over TWICE that speed when they slam into the atmosphere!

I too welcome a digital future. But the fuckhead corporate assholes wont let it happen like it should. Digital distribution should have happened a long time ago but everyone wants their cut of whats in my wallet. Everyone wants to make everything (seem) more expensive so they charge much more than it should cost.

i fight back by almost never buying new.

AAAHHHHH I saw femshep, I was hoping to avoid that untill I actually played ME3

but...DAMN I think my heart skiped a few beats...Im PUMPED for ME3!

OT: he makes good points...but I still want physical copies

Kapol:
I like phyisical copies of games because I know I own them. If something happens and I do, say, get banned from Xbox live, I can sell my copy of the game to another. That brings up my biggest fear with the digital age... it's giving publishers an incredibly amount of control over the consumer. In ways they really shouldn't be able to if you ask me.

The best example of this is something even the beloved Valve does. Taking away your ability to play all of your games for doing something that breaks the ToS. Or for some services *cough*Origin*cough* it's more like whenever the company feels like it. Now you can say that most companies would use it sparringly, but there is always margin for error. And the fact they have the power both legally and technically to just take away things that you legally purchased without any compensation seems wrong to me. And that's just one example of the kind of power companies will have with digital distribution.

There's two things you have to consider when making that argument though:

First, there's a flip side to what you're saying there. Yes, if you get banned from Xbox, you can sell the intact disk, however if that disk breaks your out of luck. With digital distribution, you have to be more careful to not get yourself banned yea, but there's no way short of the digital distribution service going out of business for you to actually lose your game (as long as you're not banned).

Secondly, when most people talk about digital distribution, they're talking about PC games, in which case your scenario is a non factor. Thanks to limited-use CD keys being fairly common in PC games for verification, no reputable retailer will buy a used PC disk from you anymore, so you don't even have that recourse of selling the game you got banned from.

Snipermanic:
God, where is that pink guy with the bent nose and cigar from? That's going to keep me up all night unless I remember

That's Cyril Sneer from a Canadian animated show: The Raccoons.

OT: Less digital distribution than the existance of the internet itself. The amount of even legal crap on here for free or dirt cheap has been an issue to the business world for years. We;ve already seen the majority of the death spiral of newspapers and magazines, while things like porn, music, books, and yes video games struggle to make the business model work. Why buy a bad Star Trek book when I can read bad Star Trek fanfiction, read a comic book when so many web comics are out there, or pay money for what's in a web browser game? Heck, I have more interest in Moviebob's Game Overthinker story segments than just about anything on network TV right now.

In the long run, it isn't piracy that's going to hurt businesses the most. It is that cheap competetion we get so much of online. Of course, that's going to be for the best in the end and monopolies are rarely good, but it's going to be a long fight.

kiri2tsubasa:

Zachary Amaranth:

The United States is full of companies so profit driven they will cap usage and ban people for too much internet rather than improve infrastructure. Comcast, one of the largest ISPs in the nation, has not laid new line in over a decade. In some regions, it's actually been fifteen years or more since there was any infrastructure increase.

Now, I cannot prove a negative. There's a chance that things will change in the future, but there's also a chance that if I think positive thoughts, I will become a millionaire. You're talking about things changing away their normal progression in this country, not toward it and that shifts out of your favour.

Exactly, this is a problem that people keep glossing over. Where I live for $60.00 a month you get 5 gig internet cap. For over $100 a month you get unlimited no cap internet. So if the PC market, and it seems to be going this way goes to a pure digital distribution model, then people like me will be ignored because we suffer due to internet caps. The only other way for us to game is by consoles since you can play them without being connected to the internet.

Wow, didn't realize it was so bad in the US. The download cap went the way of the dinosaur here when companies started doing more or less without and to compete you had to get rid. I get 4.5 Meg download down my line with unlimited download/upload for 10 (around $15) a month!

OT: I just signed up to PSN yesterday and have gone mad with the digital content, it's brilliant to be able to get games without having to pay for parking and put up with crowds of the unwashed masses.

Duskflamer:

There's two things you have to consider when making that argument though:

First, there's a flip side to what you're saying there. Yes, if you get banned from Xbox, you can sell the intact disk, however if that disk breaks your out of luck. With digital distribution, you have to be more careful to not get yourself banned yea, but there's no way short of the digital distribution service going out of business for you to actually lose your game (as long as you're not banned).

Secondly, when most people talk about digital distribution, they're talking about PC games, in which case your scenario is a non factor. Thanks to limited-use CD keys being fairly common in PC games for verification, no reputable retailer will buy a used PC disk from you anymore, so you don't even have that recourse of selling the game you got banned from.

For the first: That is true. But if you break one disk then you're only out one game. And some places do offer insurance against breaking or scratching the disk for a year (namely Gamestop). Most people don't buy them but they do exist. And it's not only a matter of selling either. If you have a disk, then you can normally start another account if it was only your account to be banned. If it was your system, then there's always the option to buy another. It might cost a lot, but will grant you access to all of the games you still have on disk.

Second: that is true. But with buying individual PC games, you aren't connected to a service that requires them all to be on a single account unless that game is activated on Origin or Steam. That is a growing trend I'm not very fond of overall. Though I do like the option is presents in buying from multiple places. You can still get banned from individual games you buy of course. And frankly, I have no problem with that. Most the time you'll still be able to play single player since most single-game bans seem to be online only from what I've seen. Single Player is my focus anyways.

Of course, for the second, you could always argue that you can still buy from places like Direct2Drive and the like. But the problem is that those places can normally cut you off from the file download, your keys, or both. With a physical CD of the game, you can always install it (as long as you don't break/lose the disk or key of course) and many games seem to work fine on the same system when you use a CD key again. At least that's my experience with them. That's changed a bit with publishers tying CD keys to accounts like Ubisoft, which is basically the same form of problem as with Steam and Origin.

I really don't mind the idea of being banned from a single game if I do something wrong. But if something goes wrong on services like Steam where my bank or Paypal issue a chargeback I'm not aware of, the game in question isn't just removed. My entire account is locked and I have no access until I can get things fixed. If I can at all that is. So banning itself isn't necessarily bad, just the extent it can be done by those who control the bigger services.

The closest I've come to jumping on the digital band wagon is with my iPod Touch and my hundreds of games that I've bought (many of them I got for free thanks to temporary deals)

But the main problem I'm seeing with this is that it seems like it's catering mostly to the PC Gamers.

As much as I enjoy having my physical games proudly displayed on my shelf, I'm not entirely opposed to digital distribution, especially if it means knowing more of my money spent will go towards the developers, but it would certainly need to be fine tuned to apply more to consoles as well as stuff like Steam.

A lot of PSP games these days for example are released at the same time on PSN as they are in stores, and since hindsight is 20/20 the Sony Market has evolved to where that's the right idea since PSN games are backwards compatible with the Vita.

Physical copies of games isn't something I'm willing to give up cold turkey, but complete digital distribution is certainly something that I could see us evolving into over the next 5-10 years or so.

"aren't I brilliant? Alright fuck off...."

I died laughing

Kapol:
Most the time you'll still be able to play single player since most single-game bans seem to be online only from what I've seen. Single Player is my focus anyways.

With a physical CD of the game, you can always install it (as long as you don't break/lose the disk or key of course) and many games seem to work fine on the same system when you use a CD key again. At least that's my experience with them.

I really don't mind the idea of being banned from a single game if I do something wrong....

The parts I didn't quote I have no issue with, the post was just long enough that I picked out the spots I wanted to respond to.

To the first part, if you don't play a lot of multiplayer, then you're not likely to get banned, just in general, a vast majority of things you can get banned for have to do with player interactions to my knowledge (which may be limited in this field).

To the second part, I'd not be willing to bank on that after what happened with Anno 2070.

Third, if you don't mind the idea...why are you complaining? Unless you don't think that failing to properly manage your paypal funds constitutes doing something wrong.

Also, Steam locking accounts for that reason is most likely to deter fraud, if a hacker has a method of downloading a game from Steam, modifying it so that it's separated from Steam and doesn't need it to run, there's not much stopping him from just buying a game, hacking it, and canceling the charge to essentially get the game for free if all it would do was remove the game from his account.

RoseArch:
Sorry, Jim, but it isn't quite that simple. A fully digital future is a dire one indeed, because I doubt that even in fifty years, the entire world will have access to an internet that allows them to download gigabytes upon gigabytes. Or to hardware that will store that amount. Cloud gaming? Again, requires a good internet and constant internet connection. As it stands, gaming will have to go the way of music where the market is half hard copy and half digital. That is a good future.

I second that. And add to it that when I download my digital music file, I can use it anywhere on any machine that I want. If I wanted to share it, I could and the music companies accept this hit. This is something that the likes of EA and Ubisoft would refuse so we would still be linked to annoying DRM.

My other problem is what happens when the license runs out on that company. Its stated that the license for XBLA games are stuck to my particular Xbox 360. Once a year I can migrate ALL OF IT to another machine (I guess if it dies) except for the content that Microsoft no longer has the license to. I call bullshit on this as well. I will never have this problem with my NES cartridges for two reasons:
1. If my NES dies, I can use the cartridge on another system
2. I'm on my fourth Xbox 360. My fucking NES is 22 years old and hasn't had a bad day.

vxicepickxv:
Pandemic - Destroy All Humans, Mercenaries, and a few other titles.

*sniff*

...Pandemic Studios...

*wipes away tear*

Also, you should realy add Star Wars: Battlefront II to that list, it was pretty damn popular and still is.

Duskflamer:

To the first part, if you don't play a lot of multiplayer, then you're not likely to get banned, just in general, a vast majority of things you can get banned for have to do with player interactions to my knowledge (which may be limited in this field).

To the second part, I'd not be willing to bank on that after what happened with Anno 2070.

Third, if you don't mind the idea...why are you complaining? Unless you don't think that failing to properly manage your paypal funds constitutes doing something wrong.

Also, Steam locking accounts for that reason is most likely to deter fraud, if a hacker has a method of downloading a game from Steam, modifying it so that it's separated from Steam and doesn't need it to run, there's not much stopping him from just buying a game, hacking it, and canceling the charge to essentially get the game for free if all it would do was remove the game from his account.

The first point ties in with the fact their taking away full access to your games when they close down your Steam/Origin account. Not just the multiplayer you got caught cheating in, but the single player that really doesn't hurt anyone with you playing (unless you include leaderboards, which isn't something I'd consider a large enough deal to grant the companies so much control over your account). And account bans aren't normally recieved for playing games anyways. Cheating in games are normally dealt with by the company who hosts the servers that are played on (VAC bans for Steam games and such).

The second isn't really a point since that's a single game. And, if I'm not mistaken, that's tied to a Ubisoft account who still hold the power to deny access to your game. You could say that it's possible that more games will recieve similar DRM access. That may be true, but with the huge backlash the game got for it, it will be something companies seriously have to consider before choosing to do. And again most of those types of games will likely need to link to some center account to keep track of the activations anyways, so they'd still hold the ability to lock you down without the restrictive DRM.

For the third, I said I don't care if single games are taken away. As it stands, they aren't. Steam just locks out your entire account. And Paypal is far from a perfect system. It's been known to do things like lock out your account if it tracks 'suspicious activity.' If you don't realize something like that's happened, or Paypal makes a more direct action like doing it themselves to make sure they don't lose any money, you're still SoL. Not to mention that customers are only human. If something does happen, why not only remove the game that was charge-backed? It's obviously possible to single out games, as what happened with the DiRT3 incident. Shutting down an entire account is pretty harsh when it's only one purchase that's gone awry.

And here's the problem with your last arguement: hackers can easily do that anyways. Steam accounts are free, and using them to purchase items then do what you suggested would not be difficult at all. Many people have duplicate accounts. That's one of the main issues they had during the christmas event, when farmers would buy a great deal of the Humble indie Bundles for a penny then use them to get gifts to sell/trade later. That's one of the main reasons they ran out of offical gifts before the end of the event and the last bit of it only have Valve games/coupons as prizes.

Not to mention chargebacks don't happen right away. A hacker could buy a lot of games on the Steam account before it does get locked down, meaning he gets to do as he likes. That's one of the problems that's arised from the Steam Trading. People will buy games for trading, then the credit card information will have been false. Steam then removes the game from the people who traded legitimate games' inventory, the account with the fraud will be locked out, but the legitimate gifts will be traded to the person's main account or (normally) sold for cash, which is much more difficult for Steam to track. Though the people who traded things in the system can normally work out a way to get the game, or their items, back. It's still a pain to worry about and one of the main reasons I got out of trading.

For that last part though, it's important to note it didn't happen right after the trade. It normally seemed to happen about a few weeks to a month after the trade had gone through. So it does take time to catch that sort of thing.

And now I've gone off on a rant. Sorry.

Zachary Amaranth:
If only we had a big digital distro network that was comparable to iTunes. Oh wait, we do. It's called Steam. And it hasn't changed pricing structures. It hasn't changed anything. Standard prices on Steam rival brick and mortar stores, the only breaks coming from Steam are sales. And that. Doesn't. Count.

This is a load of crap.

While digital distribution co-exists with physical retail I don't know if it can really change the price, or at the very least not without digital having a good market share for 5-10 years. As long as publishers still need retailers to sell physical copies of the games, the retailers will have the clout to enforce an equal selling price across all platforms. Force them to sell at a higher cost than digital and it likely won't be long until Gamestop goes down the Blockbuster road, and I don't think publishers are ready to throw them under the bus just yet.

But I have to strongly disagree with the Steam sales not counting, why wouldn't they? While they can't sell new games cheaper because they're still tied in with retailers, once the game is no longer new and leaves retail shelves then digital has full control to use creative pricing practices, and the consumer whens big time... assuming they had the patience to wait a while for the games.

Whats the name of the shooter from the Video with the guy that seems to zap into peoples minds? Anyone know?

Edit: Also, is it any good?

I'm not sure I agree because the music industry hasn't gone 100% digital. The digital side of the music business is balanced by the continued prescence of a physical product. Not to mention the nature of the product... audio emission, makes it very difficult to limit access since anyone can hear a song being played and with the right equipment capture, clean it up, and duplicate it. Barring some kind of direct-to-brain stimulation music has a practical barrier in that it can only become so expensive given it's nature and the ease of copying it outside of the discs/hardware.

There is also the collector's market for music, records, 8-tracks, CDs, and other physical media have an intristic value that actually increases in many cases, unlike video games... where such things happen very, very rarely and usually represent far more of an exception rather than the rule. To be honest I've long felt that one of the reasons why the gaming industry has wanted to move into digital media so heavily is that despite splattering "collector's edition" on everything they can to demand more money, I think it doesn't want to deal with an actual collector's market on that level which could become quite powerful and wind up leveraging it. Believe it or not as a whole the music industry IS greatly influanced by former market penetration.

I'm probably not articulating this well, or explaining it well enough, but the point is that going entirely digital is a bad thing for consumers.

It's important to note that aside from everything I've said above, media companies have been going out of their way to do everything they can to control the internet and limit the free exchange of information. At the same time they are pushing to go digital, they are also pushing to put themselves into a position where they can't be challenged online.

Right now the endgame seems to be to force the internet into a position where media industries, like the gaming industry, have the power to shut people down pretty much on a whim for their own "protection". When physical media is gone the idea is that all video games will come from digital platforms like STEAM or Origin, which will be the only option so they can feel free to set the prices. They will have the abillity to effectively nuke anyone they even suspect is guilty of an IP violation, with proposed laws that are increasingly going inthe direction of the accused having to prove their innocence as opposed to the accuser to prove guilt, while taking down the site and information in question while things are being decided. This means that these small publishers that might otherwise be "empowered" are ultimatly forced to see the publishers to have their work distributed through their services. Those who buck the system, by running their own sites, and actually get enough exposure and/or a quality product to provide competition can be shut down out of hand since a big company just has to scream wolf, and unleash their highly paid lawyers. Sure, they might lose, but by the time they do the product they were out to squash will be outdated and obselete. People wonder why big companies horde IPs, well this is one of the reasons why, and hot that will be used, the idea being that they can find something similar to what someone they don't like is doing (when the target is weak enough) and launch a suit. Win or lose, by the time things are settled the guy on the receiving end is out of the game, all it would take to knock a lot of these small developers out of the water would be a year or so of inactivity and when it can take months to even get into court after a desist order, while waiting for things to be settled, that's enough.

See, a lot of the current issues we're looking at now all fit together as part of an overall plan. You also have to look at trends, see the industry is heavily invested in things like SOPA and the power it gives, it's a key part of their long term marketing plans. If things like SOPA are stopped, it just means that they will immediatly relaunch the same thing under a differant name, continually hammering the system until they eventually get it through... and honestly at this level it's increasingly about lobbyists than what people actually think. When it comes to business policies like this it's typically a matter of paying off the politicians, and then the politicians themselves spin the desician to convince people that what they did was the right call. That sounds totally borked... but that's what we're looking at.

Those thinking "well, people will never stand for it!" are sort of missing the point. In general gamers have never been able to form a unified front, we whine, but ultimatly spend money on all these "project $10" type schemes, digital content, and games loaded with DRM and malware. The industry ignores us because they get our money anyway... people complain about the lack of dedicated servers for say Modern Warfare 2? Does it matter when the series not only broke records then, but continues to break more and more of them with each installment? The protests over the release of "Left for Dead 2" before the promised support for the firsr game? Does it matter with the number of copies the sequel sold?

The music industry was kind of late to the game, by the time it decided to get really brutal it had already created subtantial groups of people who both could, and would stand against them. Not to mention the nature of their product which doesn't exist entirely inside of a computer (ie it's projected sound... where witgh a game the projections are only part of the whole, you can't get a game by recording just the noise and then cleaning it up). The gaming industry seems to be wise enough to try and prevent this from happening. There isn't even a collector's market buying up CDs, comics, or whatever by the thousands, because things like game cartridges which have increased in value are compairively rare... where really, almost any record that is a couple of decades old is probably worth more than you initially paid for it to someone. Nobody ran out to buy games (and it's now impossible with the physical copies usually just being links to digital services) in hopes they would increase in value, unlike tghe situation with music... and especially comics, where you might see people buying multiple copies of every first issue in hopes that one or more series will be a big deal in a decade or three with the price increasing.... and that is one of the reasons why comics and music are never likely to go entirely digital.

sure its handy if you can download games, music etc but this still doesnt mean every company has to do it.
like €A with their spyware origin, forcing people to have it. i will not get my self ME3 just because of this. not on steam..., retail version still requires spyware origin and im not willing to let €A on my pc so that i can play this game.

but its understandable why bigger companies always spend tones of money in a game because they want to make sure they get more money back. they really lost touch and are afraid of competition since smaller developers make lots of money by making simple games.

Offtopic in horror here. In Sweden where I live, I have a 24/10 connection/fiber, and it costs us about 25-30$ ofcourse unlimited downloading uploading etc. (there has never been a cap)

I'm horrified by how far back a country like USA is in infrastructure.

Anyway, I'm happy about the digital age, as long as we don't get shit like SOPA/PIPA/ACTA.

TwiZtah:
Offtopic in horror here. In Sweden where I live, I have a 24/10 connection/fiber, and it costs us about 25-30$ ofcourse unlimited downloading uploading etc. (there has never been a cap)

I'm horrified by how far back a country like USA is in infrastructure.

Anyway, I'm happy about the digital age, as long as we don't get shit like SOPA/PIPA/ACTA.

God and here I pay $50 USD a month for standard cable...

..and top out at 8/2

Now I is depressed :(

FelixG:

TwiZtah:
Offtopic in horror here. In Sweden where I live, I have a 24/10 connection/fiber, and it costs us about 25-30$ ofcourse unlimited downloading uploading etc. (there has never been a cap)

I'm horrified by how far back a country like USA is in infrastructure.

Anyway, I'm happy about the digital age, as long as we don't get shit like SOPA/PIPA/ACTA.

God and here I pay $50 USD a month for standard cable...

..and top out at 8/2

Now I is depressed :(

in australia where i used to live, my connection was a wireless broadband connection and i had to pay 50$ a month and had only 5gb available. downloading was really slow. 100mb took over 45min. 30 min when i was lucky.

I skipped most JQ episodes because I did not find the first ones too interesting. They were just stating the obvious, and so does this one. But this one goes on to explain several non-trivial connections and does this in a logical, well-structured way. That earned it a place in my bookmarks so I can give it to anyone who lacks foresight about the future of video game distribution.

CardinalPiggles:

SkarKrow:
Issue: What about console sources? If the major hardware companies go digital only we will pretty much have prices dictated to you. Frankly, who the fuck wants to pay 55 for Bodycount because the publisher said so and SCEE don't give a fuck about us?

EDIT: Before I'm told to get a PC instead, I simply can't afford to get my PC up to snuff and won't be able to for a good 3 or 4 years. So yeah.

Simply don't buy the game, passively boycott any game/franchise/developer/publisher that sells their mediocre shit at extreme prices. This is why I am choosing not to buy Mass Effect 3, because it will not be on Steam and I don't like EA/Origin or even Bioware anymore.

Oh I agree absolutely, I didn't want bodycount (the demo was awful) but it served as the most immediate example to come to mind. I won't pay a stupid price for a game even if it's one I do want. I'm not buying anything from EA until they cut out most of their bullshit, I'll pick up the new SSX when I see it for 10 preowned and refuse to pay for the pass and play with real flesh people in the same room instead. I'm also not buying the Darkness 2 simply because it's another 40 game that lasts 6 hours.

As for Mass Effect 3? 2 bored the hell out of me, and Dragon Age 2 sucked, so yeah, it's a no-go for me.

SkarKrow:
Issue: What about console sources? If the major hardware companies go digital only we will pretty much have prices dictated to you. Frankly, who the fuck wants to pay 55 for Bodycount because the publisher said so and SCEE don't give a fuck about us?

Then it will sell poorly and the publisher will be forced to lower the price. I'm pretty sure publishers aren't dumb enough to believe we'll pay any price.

Zachary Amaranth:

The United States is full of companies so profit driven they will cap usage and ban people for too much internet rather than improve infrastructure. Comcast, one of the largest ISPs in the nation, has not laid new line in over a decade. In some regions, it's actually been fifteen years or more since there was any infrastructure increase.

Now, I cannot prove a negative. There's a chance that things will change in the future, but there's also a chance that if I think positive thoughts, I will become a millionaire. You're talking about things changing away their normal progression in this country, not toward it and that shifts out of your favour.

And since the US is one of the largest gaming markets, this will impact distribution. Especially with how bitchy corporations get about dealing with rights overseas. The rest of the industrial world tends to be less in the pocket of media owners.

Heh, took a little longer than estimated to answer that:

Well, I can't say anything about that all. It is no secret that Europe is the biggest market fuer DD platforms (Gabe said that *cough*). What I see coming is that sooner or later developer and publisher start to realise that the profit margins through DD are better simply because so many moneysinks are cut out. I don't see that the US as the biggest buying force will be forced to place two but DD will win in significance as a platform for developers who keep their IP and indie devs.

For the infrastructure: We'll see. I hope for everyone that they get at least the same internet I have and I can't understand why the US is so far behind... But spouting that nothing will change or that the maximum in the computer technology is about to be reached is simply false (the reason I actually started posting here).

(Just for comparison: We pay ~30€ per month for 1mb/s dl speed, no limits in transfered data and no additional costs for the telephone countrywide. Actually, transfer limits are extremly rare here outside of mobilde devices.)

TheKasp:

For the infrastructure: We'll see. I hope for everyone that they get at least the same internet I have and I can't understand why the US is so far behind... But spouting that nothing will change or that the maximum in the computer technology is about to be reached is simply false (the reason I actually started posting here).

(Just for comparison: We pay ~30€ per month for 1mb/s dl speed, no limits in transfered data and no additional costs for the telephone countrywide. Actually, transfer limits are extremly rare here outside of mobilde devices.)

Believe me. Here in the US the people that have broadband are the minority. This chart states that as of Q1 2011 US broadband penitration was at 29.8%. So, yeah, among those that have broadband (like me) we have to deal with small data caps. In my area you have one option for broadband and for $60 a month I get a 5 gig cap. Otherwise I can go with either DSL or 56K. Neither are acceptable. I do not see this change at all anytime soon, and because of this I am not looking forward to a pure DD game market.

TheKasp:

Kumagawa Misogi:

We are approaching the end of increasing computer power now and will probably max it inside the decade.

An example of a technology dead end you say? in atmosphere manned flight speed.

1903 wright brothers first powered manned flight speed 6.82mph

1967 North American X-15 4,519mph

64 years difference between the two and yet 45 years later NO progress.

You are wrong. Several months ago scientists found out a way to store so much data without increasing our storage devices in size that it was unthinkable of. Hundreds of terrabyte. The same goes for processing power and everything, we are not even close to what can be reached in computing technology.

I think they're having problems on the processing aspect at the moment, but it has been a while since I looked into it. They can't cool processors fast enough any more with current designs. I believe there was something about turning processors from flat things into what is essentially an array of blades to make cooling easier, but I struggle to recall and cannae be fecked to look it up.

Squidbulb:

SkarKrow:
Issue: What about console sources? If the major hardware companies go digital only we will pretty much have prices dictated to you. Frankly, who the fuck wants to pay 55 for Bodycount because the publisher said so and SCEE don't give a fuck about us?

Then it will sell poorly and the publisher will be forced to lower the price. I'm pretty sure publishers aren't dumb enough to believe we'll pay any price.

You'd think but some of the prices for games on the EU PSN are simply obscene at release. Nor do they drop within a reasonable time, alot of games at launch on the PSN are 54.99 on the store but 34.99 on Amazon. Even games that have been out a number of years suffer from the issue, Darksiders recently launched on the PSN for 12 when I got my copy a year ago for 8 on disc.

I'd hope they would, but they won't, not for a very long time. EA, Activision, THQ, Ubisoft, they're all dinosaurs and they need to start to understand that sometimes what they offer just isn't worth the price.

You know Jim, your not exactly wrong. Yes digital distribution can be a good thing. It has that potential to destroy the existing model that has so many problems. That is not the problem. Not at all.

TL;DR
You know. Honestly I do not oppose digital distribution. It is a great thing for the industry. Last night, I downloaded and installed Civ V in 25 minutes. Literally less time than it would take for me to drive to a physical store and back to purchase a retail copy at roughly about the same cost, with less hassle involved all around. Thats the direction that the industry needs to go. However, We are stopped at progression, and we will continue to remain stopped in that progression until the matter of games being turned into a subscription rather than a product, and exchanging ownership for licensing is resolved. Until all digital property is protected in the same manner as all physical property we CANNOT adopt an industry wide digital distribution platform. If we do, all we accomplish is trading individual freedom the promise of security against a threat that does not actually exist and history has shown us, that simply does not work. And why? All because the people pushing for this know that the MEMEMEMEMEMEMEME crowd has no idea what fiscal responsibility is, Does not care about how their actions will impact everyone, Just so long as you ca give them what they want, they will blindly pay whatever price you ask and wont even care if didnt even give them the same thing as the physical alternative. There is nothing wrong with serving that niche. The problem arises when there are so many of them adopting these illogical practices that it creates a commercial standard operating procedure so as if there are people with enough wits about them to realize the impact of their purchases it wont matter because there will be no alternative.

So Jim. Please. Stop. You of all people being a part of the industry that these people would potentially love to destroy too, should really be more careful in the direction you try to sway public opinion. Its incredibly irresponsible, and uncharacteristically devoid of forethought on the subject. So please lets not go off stopping just short of calling non adopters luddites simply because they do not want to adopt a model that hurts themselves, the industry and ALL commerce as a whole. If you want the industry to get behind digital distribution? Im all for that. But make absolutely certain that the bullshit manipulations in place are completely worked out BEFORE you try to push in that direction, or else you are duping people into trading one theoretical set of problems for a different set of actual problems with infinitely worse effects.

You can try to con me into seeing digital distribution as a totally good thing all you want, but I'm not buying it.

Why? Because digital distribution alienates, and possibly flat-out discriminates, against people who don't have, and often can't get, high speed internet!

For example, back when Blizzard released the 4.0 pre-release patch for World of Warcraft: Cataclysm. The patch was a little over 1 gig in size. It took me two days to download that patch!

Yes that includes the times I had to stop the download so other members of my family could use the internet for e-mail and such. It still counts. I even had it downloading overnight it still took that long to download.

Here's something else too. All that happened before I was forced to downgrade to 1.5 DSL because I had to move.

Imagine how nightmarish downloading a full game would be? The blu-ray disc is getting an upgrade which will increase it's storage space to around 135 gigs. Imagine trying to download a 135 gig game.

If digital distribution becomes the only means of buying games, then a good number of people will be left out simply because of where they live.

"You're not willing to cram yourself into some dinky apartment in big city #1456? Then no games and movies for you! Go tip a cow, you hick!"

Let's not forget about what would happen if all those "evil brick and mortar stores" were forced out of business. Thousands of jobs going bye-bye. Have you seen how things are? The last thing the world needs right now is more job losses!

(You may now thank god for me, Jimmy.)

Snipermanic:
God, where is that pink guy with the bent nose and cigar from? That's going to keep me up all night unless I remember

Allow me to answer your question and spare you a sleepless night.
That is Cyril Sneer from the show The Racoons.

Hope this lets you avoid a sleepless night.

SkarKrow:

Elate:

SkarKrow:
-snip-

-snip-

I see what you're saying but I don't buy a 40 game every month. I can't afford to do that either, I'm living off the bare minimum student loan for the next 3 years so yeah I seriously can't afford it. Know how many games I've bought since september? 1. MGS HD collection for 20 thanks to vouchers for Xmas.

When I stop being a poor student then maybe I can afford to upgrade my shit. When I say I can't afford any upgrade I mean it.

Well that's fair enough, I bought my PC before I was a student, but even some people I know (y'know the lucky ones with massive loans) spend stupid amounts on console games.. hell one guy even bought a 3DS for one game. I wept.

Grunt_Man11:
You can try to con me into seeing digital distribution as a totally good thing all you want, but I'm not buying it.

Why? Because digital distribution alienates, and possibly flat-out discriminates, against people who don't have, and often can't get, high speed internet!

For example, back when Blizzard released the 4.0 pre-release patch for World of Warcraft: Cataclysm. The patch was a little of 1 gig in size. It took me two days to download that patch!

Yes that includes the times I had to stop the download so other members of my family could use the internet for e-mail and such. It still counts. I even had it downloading overnight it still took that long to download.

Here's something else too. All that happened before I was forced to downgrade to 1.5 DSL because I had to move.

Imagine how nightmarish downloading a full game would be? The blu-ray disc is getting an upgrade which will increase it's storage space to around 135 gigs. Imagine trying to download a 135 gig game.

If digital distribution becomes the only means of buying games, then a good number of people will be left out simply because of where they live.

"You're not willing to cram yourself into some dinky apartment in big city #1456? Then no games and movies for you! Go tip a cow, you hick!"

Let's not forget about what would happen if all those "evil brick and mortar stores" were forced out of business. Thousands of jobs going bye-bye. Have you seen how things are? The last thing the world needs right now is more job losses!

(You may now thank god for me, Jimmy.)

It is for reasons like this that I am not looking forward to a pure DD setup. This is for you...
image

Grunt_Man11:
You can try to con me into seeing digital distribution as a totally good thing all you want, but I'm not buying it.

Why? Because digital distribution alienates, and possibly flat-out discriminates, against people who don't have, and often can't get, high speed internet!

For example, back when Blizzard released the 4.0 pre-release patch for World of Warcraft: Cataclysm. The patch was a little over 1 gig in size. It took me two days to download that patch!

Yes that includes the times I had to stop the download so other members of my family could use the internet for e-mail and such. It still counts. I even had it downloading overnight it still took that long to download.

Here's something else too. All that happened before I was forced to downgrade to 1.5 DSL because I had to move.

Imagine how nightmarish downloading a full game would be? The blu-ray disc is getting an upgrade which will increase it's storage space to around 135 gigs. Imagine trying to download a 135 gig game.

If digital distribution becomes the only means of buying games, then a good number of people will be left out simply because of where they live.

"You're not willing to cram yourself into some dinky apartment in big city #1456? Then no games and movies for you! Go tip a cow, you hick!"

Let's not forget about what would happen if all those "evil brick and mortar stores" were forced out of business. Thousands of jobs going bye-bye. Have you seen how things are? The last thing the world needs right now is more job losses!

(You may now thank god for me, Jimmy.)

i agree with you. downloading huge files takes time. wile you can install it from a disc in a few minutes. i still hope that in future you still can buy retail games form a shop and not only online.

Haven't watched the video yet (am at work atm) but I just had to applaud you for using the Alien Ant Farm logo! (unless it was a coincidence, that is)

Also, now that I am commenting on a Jimquisition video anyway, I might as well post what I had wanted to say for ages. I liked the Destructoid-era Jimquisition a lot better. I'm not saying these new videos are bad, I'm just saying that the random, unfocused, very unprofessional and rant-ish videos of that era were much more enjoyable. I know you probably can't go back to the microphone-throwing, sonic-humping days back now that you've a contract with the Escapist, but I just wanted to let you know, Mr. Sterling. IF you read these threads.

Elate:

SkarKrow:

Elate:

-snip-

I see what you're saying but I don't buy a 40 game every month. I can't afford to do that either, I'm living off the bare minimum student loan for the next 3 years so yeah I seriously can't afford it. Know how many games I've bought since september? 1. MGS HD collection for 20 thanks to vouchers for Xmas.

When I stop being a poor student then maybe I can afford to upgrade my shit. When I say I can't afford any upgrade I mean it.

Well that's fair enough, I bought my PC before I was a student, but even some people I know (y'know the lucky ones with massive loans) spend stupid amounts on console games.. hell one guy even bought a 3DS for one game. I wept.

Still waiting on the 3DS tbh, I'll pick one up when it has a pokemon game to justify the expense with stealing hundreds of hours of my life. Though it is starting to flesh out in terms of it's library.

I do prefer the lazy luxury of just chucking the disc in the console though, but I acknowledge the advantages of the PC, I use it for emulators and makings videos alot.

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