An Event to Unremember

An Event to Unremember

Marvel's "Events" aren't always the special occasion they're made out to be.

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Great article. As someone who is... well very much like your girlfriend (at least in regards to reading comics) I agree very much.

Marvel's events are why I have massively cut back on the number of comics I buy to just X-Factor and Thunderbolts. They're both great team books with interesting characters and you don't have to pick up another half a dozen titles to follow them properly either!

CBR had a similar article a few months back, but I don't think the author was ready to give up on Marvel just yet. Personally I can't stand events, and this is coming from someone who thinks "Secret Wars" was one of the best comics ever written (mostly because Doom is a boss). Its been so bad recently that I have been dropping books right and left (mostly Avengers titles) because of this shit... and because Bendis is a hack. Thank God he's leaving the Avengers... >.>

Deadpool is definitely a good pick-up-and-read for those not willing to delve deeply into comicbook history. The utter absurdity of his stories, which are often one-shot, tickles that part of the brain which goes "weeeeeeeeeeeeee..." at explosions and humorous gore.

My sister is huge into comics so she can delve into this world of cross continuity with no problem. I was less into comics and I'm far less likely to buy into an event than I am into just a Spiderman comic.

After the third (?) or so such event back in the 90s and the ridiculous Spiderman clone thing I just dropped Marvel entirely except the very occasional miniseries. No, I don't even pirate them. Even for free it's just not worth the huge amount of time to keep up, especially when you know it can all be completely retconned at a whim next summer.

I'm a female comic book fan for over 20 years. I loved me some Sensational She-Hulk growing up, along with Spider-man, X-men, and all the like.

But the reason I enjoyed them was their stories were, for the most part, self-contained. I didn't need to buy X-Force to enjoy Spider-man or Captain America to understand Thor or Avengers to see where She-Hulk disappeared to.

Event after event after event has pushed me away. I don't CARE anymore. There's no surprise. The last few years have all been the same: heroes fight a big villain (Onslaught/Scarlet Witch/Skrulls) or each others (Civil War, X-men vs. Avengers). Some B-list or A-list hero has a "shocking death" (Captain America, Thor, The Wasp, etc.), and the story ends with a whimper (or more likely a lead-in to another mega-event).

The stories are serious, plodding, predictable, drawn-out, poorly paced, and rely on shock value. There's no real fun, no real lessons learned or victory truly obtained (every victory now has to be a Pyrrhic victory).

image
I miss this era of comics.

Just a small peeve and I totally agree with the article, but if you think marvel is bad about these flow breaking "events" you haven't read DC which has been doing this crap since the 90's infact if you're curious why were at this point it all started with Death of Superman which made DC so much bank everybody has been on the hook since. After Marvel looked at how well Death of Superman did they started that god awful Spider-man Clone Saga crap and it's been downhill since then.

Now, here my fix. Kill all reoccurring series and go to mini-series and storylines. With that you kill all continuity and series cohesion issues. Everybody does their own thing. This has worked very well for Mike Mignola.

I enjoy a big, all encompassing event every now and then, but like you say, Marvel (and DC to almost the same extent) are pushing them out too often. As soon as one is finished, there's lead up issues to the next, with little to no downtime inbetween. Doesn't seem like Fear Itself ended long ago (it didn't), but Marvel already building up X-Men vs. Avengers.

That, and while I love the concepts of many of Marvel's events, their execution leaves a lot to be desired. The idea of Civil War, with the heroes divided over a political and ethical issue, is a good one, but one side ended up getting over villainized and the ending was pretty weak. And Secret Invasion, where shape shifting aliens had infiltrated nearly every faction of Marvel universe, was a good idea, until all the hidden aliens were revealed in the first issue and everything after turned into your basic alien invasion plot.

Edit: Oh yeah, and Marvel's formula of "Let's kill off a B-list hero half-way through to show that we're super serious then kill an A-list hero at the end (which we'll purposely spoil beforehand to build up buzz) to make it look like the whole thing was important after all" is really getting old.

I think one of the problems is something that MovieBob inferred in a "COMICS ARE WEEEIIIRRRD" segment; that most of the big name, "superstar" writers working in the business used to be comic fans and are getting to play out the huge "what if" scenarios that they had as kids in the main continuity without any editorial restraint or restrictions. It all comes down to careless and/or egotistical writing and poor editorial control.

There was a reason that "What If..." and "Elseworlds" were created; because some storylines that sound cool at first only work within the confines of a consequence free, alternate reality environment.

This is why I've lost a lot of interest in Marvel stories. I loved "Secret Wars" but when I tried reading "Civil War" I just couldn't keep up. I know, sadly, most of the Marvel history since I'd been reading since I was little and going through my brothers back collection. However the whole yearly Event mentality has just driven me over to DC. Up until recently I'd never been much of a fan of DC but the New 52 has been pretty good writing, (Aquaman being my favorite right now).
However, there is an Event winding up with I, Vampire and Justice League Dark but hopefully it will only be those two books.

I thought Civil War was supposed to be one of the more accessible events. Wasn't it supposed to have gotten a lot of new people interested in the comics because of all the promotion it got?

I'm not an avid comic book reader myself but I think events are much easier to follow after the fact, when everything's collected into organized volumes.

The point about comic book character being reduced to trademarked property is the awful truth. The strategy of Marvel and DC is not to hook readers with great stories but to keep the value of their licensed properties. Comic books are their trademark delivery system.

And this is why Deadpool is awesome, no convoluted backstory that you have to read, or have someone tell you in my case, just to get the gist of what's going on.

I love X-men, but Christ, can any of that get anymore headache inducing?

I think Marvel needs to actually give it's characters more depth rather that, "Holy shit you guys, Cyclops is dead! We need to investigate!" They really need to tone down all the events and make them appear not so frequent because I fear the next event is not going to make me care in the slightest.

Hmmm, well I tend to disagree with a lot of this. Ongoing universes are a delicate matter of balancing development with introduction. There is a point at which they establish a character really well, to the point where an established reader has already decided if they like Spider-Man or Thor or not, and if they are buying... well they like the character. Simply re-stating the character's origin and perspective is a great way to lose readers who understand all of this and want to see their hero do something.

Indeed, I'd argue that the actual "events" and "doing something" that doesn't just retread the basics of a character is the hardest part, and also the most satisfying. This is why so many movies are basically origin stories, that might get a sequel, and then someone relauches it from the origin again. Heck even comics themselves fall into this niche where they release re-tellings of origins, flashbacks, or reveal stories which can serve to fill in readers who jumped into the middle.

This is to say nothing of the simple fact that the industry DOES create stepping on points every few years, where they say change the descriptive phrase of the primary X-men title to "Astonishing" or something and then start from a basic start point to establish the setting for a bit.

I can understand what your saying, but really I think they have acheived a workable balance given their needs.

My biggest problem with events is that I think a lot of them are badly written overall, especially when they are supposed to be universe-wide events and big players are forgotten because they would be inconveinent, and in many cases it seems likje the various tie-in titles all retread each other with a minimum of new conten as a money making gimmick. I believe events are popular with Marvel because they know they have enough addictive fans who will buy every connected issue, no matter how much it duplicates, that they can make large amounts of money for a minimum amount of work. The kinds of fans who will buy everything just so they can complain about how things didn't turn out right and how much was forgotten... but of course from Marvel's perspective they sold him all those comics, and he'll spend more money hoping they'll "fix" it or whatever so it's win/win for them.

When it comes to comic piracy in paticular, I find the idea kind of funny, as it's more ridiculous than complaints about software piracy by a factor of like 100.

While this is a side topic, you have to understand that the comics industry still exists as a collector market. Meaning that they release comics in limited print runs, and not all of them wind up getting compiled in TPB editions or collections, and oftentimes the collections can take years to appear. This is done to drive up the value of comics, as some, but not all can still increase in value because of their limited numbers. What's more the industry relies on guys who will run around the first day buying 10 copies of certain issues in the belief they will increase in value.

The point is that the product isn't really accessible as print media, if you decide you want to read a comic story arc, your not nessicarly going to be able to find all of the issues, and there might not be a collection of it out (or still in print). What's more a collection might not include all of the material/relevent issues to a storyline as many people will point out.

I find it funny that the industry complains about limited readership which seems stagnant, while not providing the material for people to read. What's more I find it absolutly hilarious that they gripe about people stealing stuff that arguably isn't availible for sale, when this probably does a lot to bring in readers who are at least going to try to buy comics... I mean assuming they can stop the 60 year old guy from loading 10 copies of everything into his comic shop till. :P

Now to be fair, the comic industry DOES seem to be aware of this to some extent and there is a push to get their stuff out there as digital media. The problem of course being that reading comics digitally isn't all that enjoyable for the most part. Even the panel-by panel features in devices like the Kindle Fire present a less than ideal experience. I imagine at some point this will be corrected, but right now I think a lot of the problem is that people aren't going to pay for that kind of eye strain, and probably figure if they are going to go through that much trouble and discomfort they might as well just pirate it for the same basic product.

Of course a good part of the problem is also that the corperate mentality is alive and well with comics and has been for a ridiculously long time. Digitally buying a comic, despite being a less pleasant experience, is not all that much cheaper than buying a physical one despite the complete lack of physical product, or delivery costs. $2-$3 for a digital comic is a bit much.

The comics industry is on the right path, but basically if it wants to be able to cultivate a readership digitally, while maintaining it's physical collector's market, it needs to be able to find a way to provide a much better digital viewing experience, and it also needs to lower it's prices and focus on volume sales. The best way to deal with pirates is to provide a better service than they do. For all arguements about how "nothing beats free" understand that there is a point beyond which it becomes worthwhile for people to buy a product due to the safety of dealing with a legitimate company, as opposed to trusting a bunch of hackers, scanners, and crackers whose scanning might simply be "recruiting" for their personal botnet.

Affecting both of these points, it's my opinion that if comics wants to make a huge impact/comeback what they should do is start offering back issues for like a dime apiece or something (digitally). See, one of the vaunting things about comics if that if you want to jump in and start reading you might find 60 or more relevent back issues all of which going for $2 to $3 apiece. Few people who are thinking about jumping in are going to drop over a hundred (or even close to two hundred) dollars to get comfortable, and reading summaries on the internet isn't the same as actually reading the comics. As a result a lot of the people looking at this either leave, or go to the pirates. On the other hand if you make that entry fee affordable say, $6.00 that's like buying one of the more expensive apps, people will do that. Then you might find them more interested in paying $1 or $2 for the newest issues when they first come out to keep current.... basically I'm talking about a dramatic price drop for "last years comics" when purchused digitally. The physical product and the collector's market is of course going to be unaffected by this.

It's anathema to the corperate mentality, but the way I see it is what I'm proposing it's so much as "losing hundreds of dollars" as much as making a few dollars from lots of people who would otherwise not give you any money at all, and also providing safety through your legitimacy for that small fee, which is something that doesn't come with pirates.

A side point it may be, but the point is that I think this is the way how the industry could deal with a lot of it's problems. Things like "events" become less of an issue because you don't have to worry so much about the origin stories or character development constantly, when anyone can download a pile of the establishing comics for a couple of bucks, last year's event for a couple bucks more, and then the current event as it happens for a buck or two an issue. Then you've got dozens of comics showing say "Spider Man" as the young teen fighting bank robbers, and establishing his personality and where he's coming from, before you see him as say a science teacher who still does that but periodicallt gets called upon to fight cosmic threats... to whatever he's doing right now.

Also do not misunderstand this, I've actually bought a decent pile of comics on my Kindle-Fire (both from Amazon, and from the reader service), which is why i can talk about how I don't find it ideal (though it's better than the PSP reader/store). I'm not saying that piracy is right here, more that the industry is stupid and greedy (much like my comments on the gaming industry, albiet I think the comics industry manages to amazingly have less brain cells between the whole thing at times... it's like they don't even realize their own problem with the collector's market and limited printings, and how it impacts a general readership).

If anything, I think the largest problem with events is the poor conception and communication surrounding tie-ins.

It seems the 90's style of having each chapter of the event in a different monthly title (i.e something like Contagion: Shadow of the Bat -> 'Tec -> Robin -> Catwoman -> Azrael -> Batman -> Shadow -> 'Tec -> Batman Chronicles -> Catwoman -> Azrael -> Robin) has mostly become passe, but the companies are in an awkward position. Of course they don't want to come right out and say "these issues are unimportant," but there's nothing inherently wrong with exploring how some Event would affect a character who is not tied to the main narrative.

I put Marvel down and walked away before house of M hit and frankly with the horror that is ultimate marvel everyone should have....

I agree with most of your points, a very good read. Fear Itself was a shoddy piece of crap that forced me away from Marvel events, the last straw as it were.

Some of Civil War was enjoyable, House of M I loved at the time, the Skrull invasion wasn't too awful and it lead into Dark Reign which I thoroughly enjoyed. Fear Itself has no redeeming qualities (wow I'm finding it really hard not to swear while describing it.)

Fiz_The_Toaster:
And this is why Deadpool is awesome, no convoluted backstory that you have to read, or have someone tell you in my case, just to get the gist of what's going on.

I love X-men, but Christ, can any of that get anymore headache inducing?

I think Marvel needs to actually give it's characters more depth rather that, "Holy shit you guys, Cyclops is dead! We need to investigate!" They really need to tone down all the events and make them appear not so frequent because I fear the next event is not going to make me care in the slightest.

where would somone start with deadpool? I assue theres trade paperbacks right?

Vault101:

Fiz_The_Toaster:
And this is why Deadpool is awesome, no convoluted backstory that you have to read, or have someone tell you in my case, just to get the gist of what's going on.

I love X-men, but Christ, can any of that get anymore headache inducing?

I think Marvel needs to actually give it's characters more depth rather that, "Holy shit you guys, Cyclops is dead! We need to investigate!" They really need to tone down all the events and make them appear not so frequent because I fear the next event is not going to make me care in the slightest.

where would somone start with deadpool? I assue theres trade paperbacks right?

Anywhere really. A really good one is Cable & Deadpool, it's really worth reading it since that series is still pretty damn funny and has some really good action sequences in it.

Fiz_The_Toaster:

Vault101:

Fiz_The_Toaster:
And this is why Deadpool is awesome, no convoluted backstory that you have to read, or have someone tell you in my case, just to get the gist of what's going on.

I love X-men, but Christ, can any of that get anymore headache inducing?

I think Marvel needs to actually give it's characters more depth rather that, "Holy shit you guys, Cyclops is dead! We need to investigate!" They really need to tone down all the events and make them appear not so frequent because I fear the next event is not going to make me care in the slightest.

where would somone start with deadpool? I assue theres trade paperbacks right?

Anywhere really. A really good one is Cable & Deadpool, it's really worth reading it since that series is still pretty damn funny and has some really good action sequences in it.

thanks for the info!

I might even head to the comic bookstore today

Typically I don't like events, but then i can't claim that as an absolute because my favourite comic book series of all time is 52, which would never have happened were it not for an event.

As for massive comic book history, I chose a while ago to go with a simple solution. Choose one character and begin a systematic collecting of everything they were ever in. First it was Renee Montoya, which led me eventually backwards to No Man's Land, which I love. From No Man's Land I picked Batgirl (Cassandra Cain's Batgirl) and worked forwards, eventually finding my favourite character from the entire DC universe, Stephanie Brown.

Along the way I picked up anything related to these three characters, which happened to include some of the best comics available from DC. All you have to do is whenever it says in one of the editor's boxes [See Birds of Prey #47] go out and find Birds of Prey #47. If you like it, buy the rest of Birds of Prey, if you don't you haven't lost that much really.

As it stands I have most of the Batman collection and all assorted spin offs and characters from Knightfall onwards (which is a lot of comics) but I don't feel like I've been completely swamped with history and continuity lockout. If I really couldn't understand something I went to internet, otherwise I bought the related comic and discovered something else that I love.

It's the reason I still love and buy comics (although the new 52 has put me off a little bit, I don't like the writing). As long as you go in with a focused idea of what you're doing, instead of trying to insert yourself in at a completely arbitrary point, then you can really enjoy yourself and find something you really love.

Trishbot:
I'm a female comic book fan for over 20 years. I loved me some Sensational She-Hulk growing up, along with Spider-man, X-men, and all the like.

But the reason I enjoyed them was their stories were, for the most part, self-contained. I didn't need to buy X-Force to enjoy Spider-man or Captain America to understand Thor or Avengers to see where She-Hulk disappeared to.

Event after event after event has pushed me away. I don't CARE anymore. There's no surprise. The last few years have all been the same: heroes fight a big villain (Onslaught/Scarlet Witch/Skrulls) or each others (Civil War, X-men vs. Avengers). Some B-list or A-list hero has a "shocking death" (Captain America, Thor, The Wasp, etc.), and the story ends with a whimper (or more likely a lead-in to another mega-event).

The stories are serious, plodding, predictable, drawn-out, poorly paced, and rely on shock value. There's no real fun, no real lessons learned or victory truly obtained (every victory now has to be a Pyrrhic victory).

I miss this era of comics.

Read Nextwave. If you like Squirrel Girl, hate crossovers, and especially hated Civil War (personally it was the reason I abandoned Marvel and will never go back) then you will love Nextwave. No continuity to speak of, no excessive angst or character development or whining. Just a teram of superheroes beating up monsters to save the world for 12 straight issues.

4173:
If anything, I think the largest problem with events is the poor conception and communication surrounding tie-ins.

It seems the 90's style of having each chapter of the event in a different monthly title (i.e something like Contagion: Shadow of the Bat -> 'Tec -> Robin -> Catwoman -> Azrael -> Batman -> Shadow -> 'Tec -> Batman Chronicles -> Catwoman -> Azrael -> Robin) has mostly become passe, but the companies are in an awkward position. Of course they don't want to come right out and say "these issues are unimportant," but there's nothing inherently wrong with exploring how some Event would affect a character who is not tied to the main narrative.

Sorry, off topic. Is your avatar Stephanie Brown's batgirl? If so, kudos and salutations, it's about time she got more love.

I mostly agree with your point, and I think that the best way of doing it was shown in 52 or Gotham Central. Instead of having entire issues of one character devoted to their reactions to the event, having something, either a miniseries or a short spin-off collection, to show how the uninvolved supers dealt with a crisis could be very interesting.

Imagine for instance a miniseries where a whole bunch of superheroes have to clean up after the chaos caused by an event. It could be mostly second stringers, so it would give the fans of those characters something to collect and enjoy, but at the same time would give the sense that the comic universe is an actual place where people live, and the superheroes have an impact on it that has to be addressed.

A lot of the great deconstructive comic books (Invincible being my personal favourite but The Boys does it as well) show the effects superheroes can have in terms of civilian casualties etc, but they actually show it from a human side, instead of someone announcing a number to Superman and a single tear runs down his face before he promptly forgets all about the massive amounts of death. (oh hello Cry for Justice, didn't see you lurking back there...)

When I started reading comics, I was really drawn to the smaller characters that would not be tied into any of the larger events. And then I was sorely disappointed. Did the Runaways really need a Civil War story? I can't even remember what that story was about or what it accomplished, but it managed to get another $15-ish out of me. And then there was the mishandling of X-Factor and tying it into the insanity going on with the X-men. And Ultimatum. The less remembered about that the better.

I used to like Marvel a lot more than I do now, I find it very tired and samey. But for me the Events allow for new interesting ideas to be explored, that's why I liked Hous of M because it showed an interpretation what might happen if mutants were the dominant species.

Plus the Noir series is so difficult to get ahold of.

Vault101:

Fiz_The_Toaster:
And this is why Deadpool is awesome, no convoluted backstory that you have to read, or have someone tell you in my case, just to get the gist of what's going on.

I love X-men, but Christ, can any of that get anymore headache inducing?

I think Marvel needs to actually give it's characters more depth rather that, "Holy shit you guys, Cyclops is dead! We need to investigate!" They really need to tone down all the events and make them appear not so frequent because I fear the next event is not going to make me care in the slightest.

where would somone start with deadpool? I assue theres trade paperbacks right?

Deadpool is perfect to pick up pretty much anywhere. From the Joe Kelly stuff when he got his first ongoing series to the more available Daniel Way that's been put out in recent years, Deadpool's hard not to enjoy.

If you can find it, I personally recommend reading Christopher Priest's run (issues #34-45 of Deadpool vol. 1). My all time favorite, and one of the best Deadpools.

Though, as mentioned in le article, Deadpool doesn't really starting point, so your best bet is to head to your local comic shop and show your support by forking over $2-3 bucks for a brand-spankin'-new issue of the Merc-with-a-Mouth!

Hey, all. Author of le article here. Thank you guys for reading my piece. It's nice to know I'm not the only one who feels this way about Marvel!!! I appreciate your comments, they let me know what about the piece works and what doesn't.

Hopefully, Marvel will someday focus on a smaller scope. I read someone referencing Nextwave and a crossover event (that I, as a nerd, am ashamed to admit I didn't recognize) in the Batverse from DC. Just like to say...totally agree. Nextwave was probably the best thing to come out of Marvel in the last seven years. And I remember when comics were more inclined to crossovers rather than Events, for instance Marvel's "Blood Ties" or "Executioner's Song."

Anyway, all we can do is voice our opinion and hope that the publishers listen to their audience.

Thanks again for taking the time to scan my entire article, as opposed to just TL/DRing it. Till next time, fellow crestfallen comic fans!

I wouldn't have such a huge problem with the events if they weren't so massive and requiring the purchase not only of the main book, but also a dozen tie-ins. Tie-ins are what bog these things down. Maybe I don't want to buy ten issues of a book I don't already follow just to find out why so-and-so is here or such-a-place is there. And they keep folding these things around themselves so you can't miss a tie-in, or stuff comes out of no where.

Flashpoint was pretty bad with this. It did help that every tie-in miniseries had to do with entirely new versions of characters, like Thomas Wayne as a lethal Batman, or Green Arrow as a weapons manufacturer. But on the other hand, who is the girl from World of Flashpoint, and why should I care that in this reality her mother died? Not to mention it had characters popping in the main miniseries, leaving suddenly for their own stories, then coming back (or not) and we have no clue what happened. Not to mention I refused to read either the Aquaman or Wonder Woman three-parters, so I was completely lost as to why the Amazons and Atlantians were at war.

The resolution to the whole thing was half-assed and didn't feel like it should have been the catalyst for a whole reboot. Damnit DC, I love you, but you make it so hard to be a fan.

On an unrelated note, does anyone know of a good run of Squirrel Girl? I've been meaning to check that out for a while, so are there any really good collections you'd recommend?

Oh!
Haha, my mistake I thought this article was about the Mass Effect 3 Endings.

Well.... easy mistake to make when you read the title of the article. :P

CatmanStu:
I think one of the problems is something that MovieBob inferred in a "COMICS ARE WEEEIIIRRRD" segment; that most of the big name, "superstar" writers working in the business used to be comic fans and are getting to play out the huge "what if" scenarios that they had as kids in the main continuity without any editorial restraint or restrictions. It all comes down to careless and/or egotistical writing and poor editorial control.

There was a reason that "What If..." and "Elseworlds" were created; because some storylines that sound cool at first only work within the confines of a consequence free, alternate reality environment.

I disagree (as I disagree with just about everything MovieBob puts out - or I did when I used to watch his videos) - Hickman on the two FF titles, Brubaker on Captain America, Fraction on Iron Man, Slott on Amazing Spider-Man - those are all superbly written titles. Sure, the events suck, but I think you have the problem backwards - that is an editorial problem, not the writers.

The Vega:
Hey, all. Author of le article here. Thank you guys for reading my piece. It's nice to know I'm not the only one who feels this way about Marvel!!! I appreciate your comments, they let me know what about the piece works and what doesn't.

Hopefully, Marvel will someday focus on a smaller scope. I read someone referencing Nextwave and a crossover event (that I, as a nerd, am ashamed to admit I didn't recognize) in the Batverse from DC. Just like to say...totally agree. Nextwave was probably the best thing to come out of Marvel in the last seven years. And I remember when comics were more inclined to crossovers rather than Events, for instance Marvel's "Blood Ties" or "Executioner's Song."

Anyway, all we can do is voice our opinion and hope that the publishers listen to their audience.

Thanks again for taking the time to scan my entire article, as opposed to just TL/DRing it. Till next time, fellow crestfallen comic fans!

If "Events" are a response to pirating... well, that is a lot like dumping gasoline on a fire in hopes of putting it out.
I spend close to $80 a month on comics because I love a good story, as a published author myself. When an event rolls around, I certainly cannot afford to budget in an extra $40 just to read every issue and keep track of the story - that would be like selling a reader a novel with only the "main" chapters in it, if you want to flesh out the story with additional chapters, the way it was intended to be read, you have to pony up extra cash.
So, do I read comics online for free? Sure do. And I'm not hurting the industry that way - I'm helping it. Because if I did not have that access, I would cut out a lot of the titles I get now because I would get frustrated with getting only a portion of the story. Safe to say I would spend half that amount each month - or less.

I think it is an easy fix (but maybe slightly difficult to implement) - for every comic you purchase a month, you get one free digital download. That way, I may be more enticed to pick up an extra issue or two a month knowing that it will afford me a way to read an entire "Event" or even just to check out a series I've been meaning to but can't afford.
I think what the people in charge fail to recognize is that most of us do not want to pirate. If you give us a fair option, we will gladly continue to support this wonderful medium of entertainment.

 

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