Escapist Podcast: Bonus: Game of Thrones and Reader Questions

Bonus: Game of Thrones and Reader Questions

On this bonus episode, we talk about the most recent episodes of Game of Thrones and answer some reader questions.

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Chris here, I should explain my dislike for how they portray Petyr.

It's mostly how they are so up front of with his darker nature and how everyone in the show is aware of it. In the books he is a very charming guy, and he wins friends that way.
In the show it's like he gives off a smell and everyone seems to be well aware of what his game is.

He is one of my favourite characters in the books, because he is such a masterful player of the game of thrones. Really only Tyrion and the Spider had an idea of his true nature.

But like I said in my e-mail, mostly me being nitpicky.

Very good podcast, liked the addition of the Game of Thrones hipster.

Ramith:
Chris here, I should explain my dislike for how they portray Petyr.

It's mostly how they are so up front of with his darker nature and how everyone in the show is aware of it. In the books he is a very charming guy, and he wins friends that way.
In the show it's like he gives off a smell and everyone seems to be well aware of what his game is.

He is one of my favourite characters in the books, because he is such a masterful player of the game of thrones. Really only Tyrion and the Spider had an idea of his true nature.

I mostly agree with one exception, I feel he's disliked in the books as well, but for a different reason, he is disliked because he's basically a nobody who rose to power very fast, by "dishonourable" means (by spinning money and being a whore-monger as opposed to the ideal of reaching high status by birth or great honourable deeds in battle).

The character I really didn't like portrayed in the show is Stannis. He feels much weaker and mellower in the show than he is in the books. Nowhere did I really see the seething anger always bubbling below the surface, and little of his ridiculous rigidity when it comes to honour and duty.

I could agree with that, when it comes to Ned.

But I never got that feeling from other characters. People may have dismissed him for his brith, but I dont know about dislike.

There is one point in the books that sums it up well. Someone describes him as likable fellow, of low birth, great to have around, and not a threat to anyone. Therefore perfect to have on the council.

As to Stannis, I very much agree that he seems more mellow in the show.

I was going through the Family trees, "if" all the Targaryens were dead the next closest branch would be the Baratheons, Robert and Stannis' Grandmother was a Targaryen. I thought this was interesting and share it.

Tywin's anger and disappointment with Jamie in the reading scene is not that he is exactly stupid. Jamie "was" suppose to be his heir to Casterly Rock. Jamie can't be heir due to his taking the oath to be a kingsguard.

Yeah for talking about Jaqen H'ghar this time!!!
Funny it doesn't matter if it is the books or show, he seems to be everybody favorite character.

I do really hate they are straying more from the books. That was so great about the first season, I wasn't expecting to be straight from the books, but still had the intention of the books, it never strayed to far.

I still think at least Meera Reed is an important character, and I can understand Jojen Reed being taken out and his visions given to Bran.

And to kill off Irri, unforgivable.

I'm having an issue where the podcast only 'loads' the first minute or so. :(
I'm dealing with a a hangover right now so laying here listening to this would've been super awesome.

Blunderboy:
I'm having an issue where the podcast only 'loads' the first minute or so. :(
I'm dealing with a a hangover right now so laying here listening to this would've been super awesome.

Working now.
At last I can get back to cursing whiskey but ultimately forgiving it while I listen to you guys discuss a show I love.

So far the second season as been very divergent from the book, especially with Dany, and Arya. Dany never begs to get into Qarth, and Arya was not cup-bearer to Tywin Lannister. When Tywin was there she was just servant around the castle.

I'm interested to see how the changes will converge with story arcs from the books but I was really hoping that this season would hold as close to the books as the first season did.

Also I agree with Alex and blame Catelyn Stark for everything starting with her abduction of Tyrion in book one.

Being in Shanghai and listening to this podcast = big fan.

Lex Darko:
So far the second season as been very divergent from the book, especially with Dany, and Arya. Dany never begs to get into Qarth, and Arya was not cup-bearer to Tywin Lannister. When Tywin was there she was just servant around the castle.

I'm interested to see how the changes will converge with story arcs from the books but I was really hoping that this season would hold as close to the books as the first season did.

Also I agree with Alex and blame Catelyn Stark for everything starting with her abduction of Tyrion in book one.

I don't know, yes she didn't help matters, but if JB didn't send the killer to take care of Bran, she wouldn't have taken the IMP and she would still be in Winterfell.

You guys skipped over the best part - Tyrion bitchslapped his ill-tempered nephew, again, and probably got a good bit of horsepoo on his hand from doing it.

i love the hound (almost my favorite character) and i disagree that you don't see that he has a soft spot for Sansa. the first he speaks to Sansa was in season one. the episode she and her sister lost their wolves. that scene showed that he is a decent man and that he has a kind heart even though he looks really ugly and rough. the second time he speaks to her was when Jofrey showed the heads of Ned to Sansa. you then see he feels sorry for her, but also that he can do nothing about it. he also supports her at the start of the season to not kill the drunk nobleman who was late for his duel. the next time shows really (for me) that he really will try to help her when he can. when she is beaten by the kingsguard and Tyrion makes it stop, he demands for something to cover her up. the first person that acts without hesitation is the hound. even though he is the personal guard of the King, he just helps her.

I've really enjoyed the scenes with Tywin Lannister and Arya Stark. I almost get the sense that Tywin wished his own children, or at Cersei, could be more like Arya. As you mentioned in the podcast the interesting thing about Tywin is that he is obsessed with creating a dynasty that will stand the test of time, but none of his children are worthy heirs.

Tyrion has the brains, Jaime has the martial prowess and Cersei has the ruthless determination to do whatever she deems necessary. I get the sense that it's almost as if what Tywin desires most in an heir has been divided amongst all three of his children.

I agree, everything bad happening is Cat's fault. I believe I even had that conversation with Susan once before. Glad to know Greg agrees.

VladG:
[quote="Ramith" post="6.374822.14531960"]

The character I really didn't like portrayed in the show is Stannis. He feels much weaker and mellower in the show than he is in the books. Nowhere did I really see the seething anger always bubbling below the surface, and little of his ridiculous rigidity when it comes to honour and duty.

It is a shame really. Stannis is one of my favorite characters. In the books he does not only have the qualities you cited but he is shown to be a much more sympathetic and conflicted character. I like his actor, but the writing and lack of screen time have conspired to show him as a simple villain.

Theon and Cersei on the other hand are much better on the show.

Bonus: The credits music of the last episode. Fits Theon drowning in an ocean of darkness.

None of this is spoilers, because I'm speculating pretty hard. I suppose very, very light spoilers through Storm of Swords.

Jon Snow is not Ned Stark's bastard son. He is, in fact, the son of Rhaegar Targaryen and Ned Stark's sister, Lyanna.

See, Robert's Rebellion was less about overthrowing the Mad King, and more about Rhaegar "stealing" Ned's sister. Otherwise, why not just kill Aerys quietly and let Rhaegar be king? By all accounts (except Robert's), Rhaegar was a great guy and would have made a great king. Robert and Ned want to kill Rhaegar because Robert and Lyanna were supposed to get married, but Lyanna ran off with Rhaegar (this is hinted in, I believe, Storm of Swords, with Meera's story of the Mystery Knight). Robert claims (in GoT) that Rhaegar raped Lyanna, but Robert's bitter and jilted and not exactly trustworthy on this subject.

So.

When they talk about Lyanna's death, we know very little, mostly just what Ned was hallucinating in the Black Cells. But we do know that she was being guarded by three of the Kingsguard, which doesn't make sense if she's a prisoner that Rhaegar's raping as Robert claims, so she's almost certainly being protect as family to the king (Rhaegar's nearly-born child). Ned makes some mention of the a bed of blood and the smell of roses... and not really any mention of how, specifically, she died.

Speculation time:

Lyanna died during childbirth with Jon Snow. Ned Stark claims Jon is his bastard because he doesn't want Robert to kill his (Ned's) nephew as a Targaryen, which means that Jon Snow has a better claim to the throne than even Joffrey.

This is very, very strongly hinted in Dany's vision in the House of the Undying (which, incidently, should be happening this next week or so on HBO's Game of Thrones): "A blue flower grew from a chink in a wall of ice, and filled the air with sweetness." The only time we hear about blue flowers are in relation to Lyanna: she loved blue roses, Rhaegar gave her a crown of blue roses, Ned always thinks about her in relation to roses and takes roses to her tomb. If the blue flower represents Lyanna, and the wall of ice represents a Wall of ice, then Jon Snow being Lyanna's son makes a lot of sense. It also implies a strong connection between Jon and Dany, which brings me to my next point.

The name of the series is Song of Ice and Fire. Obviously, there's got to be some Ice and some Fire for this series to, ultimately, be about. Dany is, I think everyone can agree, the Fire, what with her desert travels and dragons. Ice could be a reference to the White Walkers and such, but, frankly, I think that's a weak claim. The mystic elements of the north have always been omnipresent and foreboding, but they've never been a focus. The Song of Ice and Fire has always been, primarily, about the politics and peoples of Westeros, which means Ice is probably going to be a person, especially since the original idea for the series was a fantasy retelling of the Wars of the Roses.

What's going to happen, possibly as soon as Winds of Winter (I haven't read Dance with Dragons yet, so I'm not sure how far along things get there) but probably not until A Dream of Spring, is that Dany's going to invade Westeros. I suspect Stannis (possibly because of Sam Tarly, possibly through the Reed family of the Neck, since Howland Reed was present at Lyanna's death and, therefore, Jon Snow's birth), is going to find out the Jon Snow is actually the rightful heir to the throne, and, being Stannis and full of honor and propriety, will crown Snow.

To stem the tide of war in the face of the White Walker invasion, Jon Snow and Dany will get married (marrying your aunt? Weird, but par for Westeros and the Targaryens) to present a united front to the Others.

I'm missing a single point... The dragon must have three heads (Prince who was Promised prophecy), so I'm missing the third head.

 

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