Pirates Are Way More Interesting Than Elves

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Well MY game based on the life of Muhammed Ali is an epic role playing game that's essentialy a Barkley: Shut Up and Jam 2: Gaiden spinoff so everything you said is probably wrong.

It's called Ali: Shut Up and Punch 2.5: Gaiden Gaiden.

GangstaPony:

You thing COD is generic and same-y? Well so are most RPG's now a days! Do something new!!
Make it based on Dresden Files, American Gods, Hellboy, Hellblazer/Constantine!

"I want something different! There are lots of stuff that are different!" *lists four urban fantasy works*

Although I do love urban fantasy and it's a shame that very few games use that setting. That is pretty much the only reason I'm keeping a hopeful eye out for The Secret World.

wouldn't say more interesting, just less used.

sides 'pirates saving the world' sounds off, not saying ever protagonist needs to be a hero, but i donno, not big on 'well crap if i don't want have any one to burn and pillage' storys

you know...we could eather give our change to the charities and have a small moment of mental masturbation

or we can just be our susal apathetic selves and the charities get no money

I don't see the issue

The Random One:

Although I do love urban fantasy and it's a shame that very few games use that setting. That is pretty much the only reason I'm keeping a hopeful eye out for The Secret World.

Secret world look so cool...but unfortunatly its an MMO :(

I personally blame D&D rather than Tolkien.

I mean, Tolkien wrote a pretty generic story and gave us a generic terminology for fantasy creatures. D&D however gave a full fledged system for telling any number of generic stories using generic fantasy creatures. The problem is that the mechanics themselves actually favour a particular type of story, namely a generic bildungsroman about characters setting out to be adventurers and growing from poorly armed peasant farmboys to badass heroes of the land.

Something I never actually realized until I read this article though is how much that system also rewards deeply non-human behaviour. Yeah, it's actually kind of dumb for my character to repeatedly risk life and limb or carry out senseless fetch quests, unless we accept that somehow my character knows that every time they do this stuff they become more powerful because arbitrary bullshit says so.

RJ Dalton:
I don't think that's necessarily true. Pirates just haven't been as overused as elves have. Given enough time and too many generic movies and games featuring them and pirates will become just as boring.

Come now. One flat stereotype is clearly superior to another flat stereotype.

>.>

Ali wouldn't appear in a first-person shooter? I wouldn't have expected a rapper to appear in one, but hey they did it anyway. That aside, I'm glad to see Pirahna Bytes finally get a little recognition for their storytelling.

Aerograt:
Anyone else think moral masturbation sounds pretty hot?

No... I think in this context it works only as a deterrent for giving to charity.

disappointed:
I once played a paper-scissors-stone tournament without using my index finger but people kept getting mad with me every time I played scissors.

Well, you can't really play scissors then, can you? Of course the optimal strategy in that situation would be to play paper every time. Speaking of time, why have I wasted any of mine thinking about this quandary?

Lunar Templar:
wouldn't say more interesting, just less used.

sides 'pirates saving the world' sounds off, not saying ever protagonist needs to be a hero, but i donno, not big on 'well crap if i don't want have any one to burn and pillage' storys

I disagree actually. I think pirates have far more of a tendency to be morally ambiguous than elves do; any human society does really. When it comes down to elves and other mythological creatures it's often like they just operate on some hive mind and thus seem to lose any and all personal characteristics.

I love pirates and I really wish someone made a sandboxy pirate game with a lot of places to have random piratey encounters/adventures. It's exploration, riveting sea tales, no technobabble (they may have ship jargon but that's based on reality rather than whatever's convenient for the plot), and pirates are by definition thieves so no valiant hero of pure good stuff either.

Farther than stars:

Lunar Templar:
wouldn't say more interesting, just less used.

sides 'pirates saving the world' sounds off, not saying ever protagonist needs to be a hero, but i donno, not big on 'well crap if i don't want have any one to burn and pillage' storys

I disagree actually. I think pirates have far more of a tendency to be morally ambiguous than elves do; any human society does really. When it comes down to elves and other mythological creatures it's often like they just operate on some hive mind and thus seem to lose any and all personal characteristics.

eh, depends on the race, but far as elves go(and every other 'standard fantasy race' really), yeah but that's the fault of the writes being boring by ripping off Tolkien for millionth time, which i think is the real problem here.

a lack of imagenation

Therumancer:
Pirates only seem fresh because they haven't been used as much as elves recently. As a stereotype the whole pirate thing falls apart a lot faster than your average fantasy game.

How?

I mean I know real pirates didn't act like movie pirates but they do show some similarities. Mainly being motivated by greed and robbing ships and being old salts.

Therumancer:

Not to mention that there have been a lot of pirate/seafaring games out there over the years, but most hadn't caught on due to problems with implenetation.

Monkey Island, Sid Meier, Risen, Pirates: The Legend of Black Kat (and obscure PS2 game that was actually quite fun), Pirates of the Carribean Movie tie-in games (including the Lego ones), and I literally can't name anything else. So that's like 5 or 6 franchises based on pirates (2 of them haven't had a new game in long time) vs. how many generic fantasy games?

evilthecat:
I personally blame D&D rather than Tolkien.

I mean, Tolkien wrote a pretty generic story and gave us a generic terminology for fantasy creatures. D&D however gave a full fledged system for telling any number of generic stories using generic fantasy creatures. The problem is that the mechanics themselves actually favour a particular type of story, namely a generic bildungsroman about characters setting out to be adventurers and growing from poorly armed peasant farmboys to badass heroes of the land.

Something I never actually realized until I read this article though is how much that system also rewards deeply non-human behaviour. Yeah, it's actually kind of dumb for my character to repeatedly risk life and limb or carry out senseless fetch quests, unless we accept that somehow my character knows that every time they do this stuff they become more powerful because arbitrary bullshit says so.

I think that your point that a large segment of the fantasy genre is essentially fighting over Gary Gygax's leftovers is spot-on.

However, I think if anything the modern fantasy genre needs more Gygax, not less Gygax. The whole "4-6 individuals of equal class level on a quest to save the world" thing isn't anything like most of D&D's source material, and isn't like the sort of story D&D's mechanics were (initially) designed to tell. The mechanics (for instance, high mortality rate for low-level characters, XP gained from looting, and so on) were designed to create a very different sort of story - characters plundering tombs, stealing from mighty sorcerers, exploring strange places, and generally getting in over their heads.

IMO, we don't need more pirates, we need more fantasy game designers reading stuff by Jack Vance and Fritz Leiber. Or stuff by Tolkien, oddly enough. The Hobbit and Lord of the Rings as written by Tolkien are significantly more interesting than The Hobbit and Lord of the Rings as aped by other fantasy authors or as directed by Peter Jackson.

MB202:
Like I said, pirates rule. 8)

I prefer them to ninjas, ESPECIALLY in video games, considering there are WAAAAAAAY too many ninjas in video games.

Oh yeah, in terms of what makes a more interesting character, pirates beat ninjas to a bloody pulp.

I mean ninjas need to have an aura of mystery isolation and sneaky so they don't reveal a lot, and any holes in motivation are sometimes explained through nebulous reasons of honor.

Pirates never have either of those problems.

Anyone who lives like a hermit is not a pirate, and pirates do have loyalty but they also mutiny on occasion.

Delock:
Still waiting for an RPG where you're either A: the back-up hero and people clearly know this given there's a system for "chosen ones" with you being something like 48th in line and the villain ends up systematically killing everyone in front of you off over the course of the game as they gather all the ancient artifacts while you went off on your own (increasingly interrupted) quest to go fetch something mundane or B: someone who increasingly runs across what a normal hero of an RPG would be while you carry on trying to keep the local inn afloat while dealing with the continual forces of evil trying to burn down the hero's home town (your town).

Those are some pretty solid ideas, I especially like the first one, I hate chosen one stories the idea of destiny just rubs me the wrong way and that sounds like a good way to take stabs at the idea.

I'm gonna give JRPGs credit here there fantasy lore is a bit more diverse from game to game. and more urban fantasy, or any more modern time period, I always wanted to see a fantasy world hit there version of an industrial revolution.

All of Yahtzee's motivation examples are forms of compulsion.

Ever played Lunar: the Silver Star? The protagonist of this game sets off on his adventure under no compulsion whatsoever. There's no looming threat to the world (to his knowledge), no higher calling or authority telling him to go. He sets off to fulfill his ambitions on an otherwise perfectly normal day.

The Crazy Legs:

Dastardly:
I'd offer that people aren't nearly as sick of zombies as they are of the same few generic characters used in zombie settings.

... This. (Please don't report me)

I like my zombie games, I really do, but the characters have a tendency to be... well, shit. Dead Rising (the first one, I haven't played the second) offered somewhat of a change to it by having its special backstories involving psychopaths, escaped convicts, and a photographer with the most annoying in-game voice in the world (I'm talking about "Kent", which is weird because he sounds normal in the cutscenes). Still, though, Dead Rising's main characters are just stereotypical cut-and-paste characters. "Strange Hispanic Man". "Strange Hispanic Woman". "Photojournalist". "Agent".

... But really, that can be forgiven when you compare Dead Rising to, say, Dead Island (what's with all the "Dead"?), you'll find which is truly better. ... And no, graphics don't make anything better. ... Okay, they do, but nowadays they really don't, considering we're still comparing everything to Half-Life.

Dead Rising was never really trying to anything new with zombies though, its about as old school zombie as you can get, and thats what makes it great (to me). That and in Dead Rising 2: Off the Record Frank makes some of the most delicious puns ever

This is why I was looking forward to this game, but alas diablo 3 is still more fun, and has no elves either. Nor pirates, but I was pleasantly shocked to see how smarmy the wizard is!

Even if you do have Elves and Dwarves the leat you could do is put a new spin on their personalities or make it so each elf is different. One could be a petty thug and talk like some modern gangster while another might be this scheming businessman looking to exploit his customers.

As others have said, you could also take something mundane and make it into an RPG.
Like you are just tying to manage an inn or something but the hero/villain fights constantly ruin everything so you decide to turn the tables.

RJ Dalton:
I don't think that's necessarily true. Pirates just haven't been as overused as elves have. Given enough time and too many generic movies and games featuring them and pirates will become just as boring.

You're right - I suspect the pirates in Risen do all the generic piraty stuff we expect pirates to do. That would become boring fairly quickly if we had a pirate sidekick in every game.

Then again, the fact that there aren't very many pirate based rpgs in the first place gives Risen a free pass. Heck, we don't get many games about detectives. When LA Noire basically made a straight up, LA Confidential rip off, people were pleased because though it was playing to every stereotype in the book, at least we were getting something different to play.

aegix drakan:
*takes notes*

I'm the main writer for a small RPG project. I agree with this.

Time to go triple check character motivations to make sure all of them are believable.

How about because they want money gold and riches? After all when I'm in a dungeon that is the ONLY thing I'm thinking about, Borderlands was perfect because of that.

Also, "standard fantasy/standard sci-fi". Those phrases should be oxymorons, we explore fantasies because they aren't normal, they should be interesting.

I'd like a pirate game where you could fire your broadsides at close range, swing across to the enemy ship on a rope, kill the captain and take all their booty. Gather enough ships loyal to you and then you go on to sack townships.

The final battle culminates in a deafening barrage of cannon fire and furious melee when the King sends a fleet to take you down.

You're a pirate, motivation isn't much beyond rum, booty and booty (girls, wenches etc).

I suppose generic fantasy games get dull after a while, and I'm not sure what kind of game I'd like to see... maybe something involving steam punk?

The_Blue_Rider:

The Crazy Legs:

Dastardly:
I'd offer that people aren't nearly as sick of zombies as they are of the same few generic characters used in zombie settings.

... This. (Please don't report me)

I like my zombie games, I really do, but the characters have a tendency to be... well, shit. Dead Rising (the first one, I haven't played the second) offered somewhat of a change to it by having its special backstories involving psychopaths, escaped convicts, and a photographer with the most annoying in-game voice in the world (I'm talking about "Kent", which is weird because he sounds normal in the cutscenes). Still, though, Dead Rising's main characters are just stereotypical cut-and-paste characters. "Strange Hispanic Man". "Strange Hispanic Woman". "Photojournalist". "Agent".

... But really, that can be forgiven when you compare Dead Rising to, say, Dead Island (what's with all the "Dead"?), you'll find which is truly better. ... And no, graphics don't make anything better. ... Okay, they do, but nowadays they really don't, considering we're still comparing everything to Half-Life.

Dead Rising was never really trying to anything new with zombies though, its about as old school zombie as you can get, and thats what makes it great (to me). That and in Dead Rising 2: Off the Record Frank makes some of the most delicious puns ever

Hmm... Every day I seem to be reminded I forgot to talk about the zombies. Good point, the zombies are about as generic as zombies can get, but I have to say, that just adds to their charm. And that charm almost makes me not want to brutally murder everything and everyone in that poor little mall in Colorado.

... Almost (I hate living in this state).

I think this is why science fiction has a much richer diversity in both games and literature. We have science fiction greats, but no single father of the genre that every subsequent author feels the need to pay homage to.

I'm actually surprised that the pirate genre hasn't caught on more. Historically, it seems it could provide a variety of gameplay styles and settings as well as motivation for the character. Some pirates were in it solely for the money, others were in it for glory and fame.

I would love to see a Mass Effect style of pirate game, where you recruit a crew from various ports and locales, and choose what kind of pirate you are i.e (in for gold, glory, power)

slightly off topic:
Best portrayal of elves in my opinion is by Terry Pratchett in Lords and Ladies. I've never been able to look at elves the same way.

weirdguy:

Fronzel:
I want to see a RPG (the usual fantasy setting would be fine) where you manage a small band of adventurers with the goal of getting rich. They willingly go into the dungeon of horrors or wherever so they can kill things and steal their gold and magical whatsits. There would be endless rivals trying to do the same thing. The town outside the doom pit would be like a gold rush town; ramshackle, unruly, build and frequented by people thinking only of the cash they can make today.

If you want a larger story you can have your money-grubbers stumble onto something down in the hole that they're just not practicably able to ignore, no matter how much they'd like to.

watch me railroad this post

...

have you ever played megaman legends?

Not an RPG, man. =P

Also, the whole "scour ruins, get rich" angle gets taken over right away by cartoon heroism, albeit fun cartoon heroism with memorable characters and an interesting backstory lurking in the shadows.

It is a logical fallacy to say that pirates are interesting.

P.S. capcha: little bird told me. So dont argue with the little bird.

evilthecat:

I mean, Tolkien wrote a pretty generic story and gave us a generic terminology for fantasy creatures.

Tolkien pretty much invented orcs (there were ogres before, but they looke different and was never named "orc". Tolkiens books are the oldest written usage of word "orc". The elves and other lores were nowhere close to being that much in depth either. People are not wrong when they said Tolkien invented fantasy rpgs, he invented the whole fantasy world whereas before it was bits and pieces there, but never the whole thing together.

I find it annoying and a bit hypocritical to exchange one basic speculative fantasy genre with another. Sure, we don't have many pirate or cyberpunk games, but we're still getting the same generic stuff that we always did in literature, movies or whatelse.
Take this paragraph for example:

But I'll reiterate one thing from the video: pirates have way more personality than elves. I reflected on this at one point in Risen 2 while two pirate captains were brokering an exchange of rum and gold, exchanging foul-mouthed insults with each other and breaking into raucous laughter when agreement was reached. And it occurred to me that you'd never see two elves talk like that.

Sure, elves wouldn't talk like that, but dwarves totally would! Meanwhile you'll never really see pirates trying to be more than "drunk fools with big beards and eyepatches". Hell, Monkey Island parodied the over-used trope of pirates before other games even had the chance to use the setting.
Unless you write a good pirate-themed story, or a good fantasy-themed story, or a good cyberpunk story. The theme is up to a personal preference when you decide to not really be original and just stick to one of the classics.

I also find it insulting how people blame Dungeons and Dragons for the overuse of elves and dwarves and dragons. Planescape Torment is set in an D&D setting, here's the wikipedia description on the game:

Planescape: Torment is set in the Planescape "multiverse" of AD&D, a setting which consists of various planes of existence, the creatures which live in them (such as devils, modrons, and even deities), and the properties of the magic that infuses each plane.The first part of Planescape: Torment takes place in Sigil, a city located atop an infinitely tall spire at the center of the multiverse, that connects the planes with each other via a series of portals.

Doesn't really sound generic, does it? Other interesting D&D settings are Eberron, Ravenloft or Dark Sun. Not to even mention the multitude of other interesting tabletop RPG settings which may or may have not seen a video game adaptation. I've played more Deadlands or Shadowrun than anything else in my life.

The problem goes deeper than "hurr elves do not want" or "only japan knows how to be original roflmao".

GangstaPony:
I like how the Japanese have made badass RPG's like Persona which has a High school combined with demons setting and yet western developers are content eating Tolkien's leftovers!

You thing COD is generic and same-y? Well so are most RPG's now a days! Do something new!!
Make it based on Dresden Files, American Gods, Hellboy, Hellblazer/Constantine!

If it was done well, I would so very definitely buy a Dresden Files game. I'd even upgrade my computer just to play it.

"Because they're just "good".

Usually offered as a reason why the character goes out of his way to rescue the imperilled wife of some bloke he's never met and will never meet again, or indeed save a kingdom they show no sign of familiarity for. Anyone who risks their own life and expends potentially vital resources to save something they might not have any stake in simply because they were asked nicely is probably a complete arsehead. And it's not even being "good", strictly speaking. It's like giving money to random charity workers canvassing on street corners. That doesn't make you a good person. You wouldn't have spared a single thought for the orphans if you hadn't been badgered about it. You're doing it to temporarily feel good about yourself, a sort of moral masturbation. And if a wandering adventurer doesn't take time out to rescue every imperilled wife in the kingdom then he's clearly only taking on an isolated case to gain XP and a pair of the husband's old armoured trousers."

Long response to this: I think this is unfairly and unreasonably cynical (yeah yeah, I know it's Yahtzee, I don't care, it's still a crappy attitude to take). It would be stupid motivation if it caused the character to act like a posturing, melodramatic, self-righteous attention whore, but believe it or not, there -are- some people out there who honestly are willing to help people just because they asked for help. It's not completely unreasonable to expect a character to show some semblance of genuine charity, to do something just because it's the right thing to do. Take for example the movie "A Fistfull of Dollars." Clint Eastwood's character *SPOILER ALERT!!!!* rescues a young woman held captive by a gang of gun runners and gives her and her family money to start a new life somewhere. Why? The only thing close to a reason we're given by Eastwood's character is "because I knew someone like you once and there was nobody around to help." That's it. It's never explained exactly who that someone was, if it was the protagonist's mother, a relative, or what, just "someone." You do get the impression it may have been someone close to Eastwood's character, but it's never explained who or why he himself should have cared or had a personal stake in it. In short, he did it because he'd seen the situation before and knew that helping the woman was "the right thing" to do. And this from a hard-bitten gunslinger who'd been playing two gangs against one another to milk them for as much money as he could.

So a sense of morality and charity isn't a completely stupid or creatively bankrupt concept to use as motivation. As long as the character has some depth to himself/herself otherwise and more personality than just being some two-dimensional super hero, there's no reason to just throw it aside.

Short response to this: Oh f**k you!

Father Time:

Therumancer:
Pirates only seem fresh because they haven't been used as much as elves recently. As a stereotype the whole pirate thing falls apart a lot faster than your average fantasy game.

How?

I mean I know real pirates didn't act like movie pirates but they do show some similarities. Mainly being motivated by greed and robbing ships and being old salts.

Therumancer:

Not to mention that there have been a lot of pirate/seafaring games out there over the years, but most hadn't caught on due to problems with implenetation.

Monkey Island, Sid Meier, Risen, Pirates: The Legend of Black Kat (and obscure PS2 game that was actually quite fun), Pirates of the Carribean Movie tie-in games (including the Lego ones), and I literally can't name anything else. So that's like 5 or 6 franchises based on pirates (2 of them haven't had a new game in long time) vs. how many generic fantasy games?

I wasn't saying there was as many of them, just that they had a solid prescence, we see one every couple of years. Granted we don't see them heavily promoted. Pirates Of Black Cove, Puzzle Pirates, Age Of Pirates 1 and 2, and of course various hidden object games and such. It's not a major genere like general fantasy is, but it's still one with a reasonable niche prescence.

The problem with the entire pirate genere is that there are only so many things that pirates do, you sail around, sink and loot ships, and maybe look for treasure. The whole pirate stereotype is pretty one note, to the point where 99% of the games out there wind up having to turn it into a parody and toss out bad jokes just to have enough material for filler.

Now granted, the same can be said of fantasy games, but the thing is that there are like a hundred differant ways to stylize the same basic material, where Pirates are kind of confined to pseudo history and fit a very specific look and attitude. Not to mention that you can put pirates into a generic fantasy game and hit all the right tropes, without much proble, but sticking fantasy tropes into something that is supposed to be based around pirates is touchier. Some attempts to do this like "Pirates Of The Carribean" carried it for a while, but as you can see that lost momentum, and arguably became a prisoner of it's own tropes.

Then there is the whole historical aspect of things. See, when people use the term "pirate" they tend to think in terms of a seafaring adventurer and free spirit, rarely do you see pirates in games or movies do anything paticularly bad, even if it's implied behind the scenes. In the final equasion pirates were not romantic figures like most people think of, because they were ultimatly a group of raping, murdering, scum. The nature of modern morality means that pretty much any pirate you see as a hero has to be an exception, or have such things remain in the past and be glossed over, which kind of limits the entire thing, as well as prevents a certain examination.

In your typical pirate game/story you want the person watching to be cheering for the pirates, and hoping they get away from/defeat national navies and such. If piracy was ever properly portrayed and deconstructed, it doesn't matter how much of a bastard you typical crown officer is portrayed as, that's who your going to be cheering for.

I'm not saying it can't be done well, because it has been, just that it's fairly limited, and works best in doses. It works well as a niche alternative to other fare, and it has been doing fairly well as exactly that. You will see far, far. less pirate games than generic fantasy games, BUT at the same time there hasn't been a drought. Sure a pirate fanatic doubtlessly wishes there were multiple big releases in that genere, as opposed to it being a sporadic thing, but the point is that it's always been out there on the fringes.

I'll also say that Risen 2 isn't the best example of a pirate game someone could use. It's a sequel to Risen and the character is the same protaganist from the first game (albiet inexplicably stripped of his power). Right from the beginning they make referances to the inquisitors Eyepatch/Monocle from the previous game. I thought it was a bit odd that Yahtzee went on about the character's ambigious motivations for doing some of the things he does and moving forward, and being on the side he is on, when it's 100% clear when you understand what happened in the first game, and how the world got all fragged up to begin with. Your character was pretty much at ground 0 of the cataclysm, trying to stop it.

Perhaps I'm forgetting something, but to be honest I was actually a bit irked that there wasn't a more robust magic system, instead just "Voodoo" part way through the game. I typically play Risen/Gothic as a mage (well I play most things as a mage) and I not only liked their schools of magic and associated quests, but can't really figure out how the character could have gone from a spear swinging, fireball tossing badarse to someone entirely reliant on swishy-poke fighting. Granted I can understand the need to reset skills, but I found that as a sequel it was kind of a "WTF" thing since it barely seems like the same world, even allowing for the cataclysm. I kind of feel that instead of making "Risen 2" they should have just made a new pirate franchise, especially seeing as those jumping into this going "wow a pirate game" doubtlessly are going to have similar issues to Yahtzee, in wondering why certain things are going on and what motivates the character, not that it much matters because it might as well be an entirely differant universe. Even if magic doesn't work like it used to, a guy who fought with spears/bladed staffs or more traditional swords (which is what everyone was carrying) suddenly fighting with those types of weapons is a bit odd. Not to mention the whole "damn, I wish I had a gun in the first game, it would have made thing so much easier". :)

The only thing I get out of the Title is "Occupation Is Better Than Race". Which seems kind of pointless if you're an Elf who's Occupation is being a Pirate. Or if you point out the "Pirates" in Elder Scrolls. But the reason as to why Pirates are more interesting than Elves is because the 2 tend to have different time setting & locations.

Elves usually being part of the Dark Ages. A point in European history that utterly stinks when you realize that it was more Barbaric than the previous age, The Age Of Enlightenment. Because the Greek Gods were replace by some Middle Eastern fellow. And the stink didn't go away until The Renaissance. And then you eventually get the pirate setting once The Americas are discovered. And I'd considered that the most Advance setting a Western Time & Location based fantasy. hmm.... I'd say why but that would break forum rules probably.

But as far as Elder Scrolls being part of "The Elf Problem".... I have my doubts. Because at least you get the chance to play as an Anthro.... Er.... "Furry".... Because a Fantasy setting is the only setting where Anthros should belong. And in every other Dark Age Fantasy Game I instantly hate for reminding of The Dark Ages. In any other game Anthros seem way out of place. And when I see a Fur Suiter, in SR3, chances are I'm going beat them to death with a Giant Purple Dildo.

Because the World Must Be Saved!
Quite frankly the world doesn't have to be saved. Just be given the option to be destroyed by you if you want to destroy it. Saving the World or whatever is much more interesting when the phrase is "Because The World Must Be Destroyed. In Skyrim the 2nd coming of Alduin ushers in the end of that world & the beginning of the next. The Greybeards agree with this. However if you speak to their Dragon because it must be save, he'll call you a tool. However if you choose because you don't want this world to end he'll come to terms. Though I'd rather had made a treaty with Alduin on who he could & couldn't kill. I'm given the same notion by FF7 Advent Children where the 2nd coming of Sephiroth meant the destruction of the world & beginning of the next. Or in FO3 where The Children Of Atom wanted to basically destroy everything for the beginning of new universes. Or in Halo where "The Prophet Of Truth" wanted to destroy everything for a better place to live. If you haven't figured it out yet I hate Harold Camping & his ilk.

Because an authority figure told them to.
If it comes down who has the "better" authority figure then it can be kind of dull. After all the people you're probably fighting answer to a different authority figure. So switching sides just changes who told you to.

Because they're just "good".
In a world where Video Games can branch out into various stories Good & Evil should be decided by the player. The creator shouldn't even get a say of what is good or evil. Because then we may disagree with on what's good or evil. Like somehow killing innocent people is somehow "good" in FO3 via virtual Chinese Soldiers. BTW where was Timmy during that slaughter? Seems like the creator didn't want to be considered evil for killing a child.

Because it's the only way to proceed in the game.
I absolutely agree that this is a bad idea. And in most cases it makes wanting to finish a game that much harder because I tend to like it more prior to that situation. In the case of GTA4 I didn't want to kill Mikhail. If anything I wanted to blow up more buildings as that was fun. In FO3 I should have been able to kill or save James as I saw fit. But he's killed by someone else just because you turned a valve.

-

Just for laughs how Skyrim should have ended.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fyyIp3pHVwI

At the very least the hero should ask the question, "Why me?".

Saving the world is not as much fun as it is sometimes made out to be. It's not fun to sleep in the muck, or get stabbed by orcs. Anyone chosen to save the world would at some point try to transfer the responsibility to someone else. Frodo constantly tries to sneak away and let go of the responsibility.
"Why do I have to do it? Why can't Boromir go to hell and drop off the package, he is big and strong and brave."

It doesn't need much narrative work to create motivation. A pistol to the head, or a shiny ring as promise of reward is all it really takes. Come on, give us a reason why we have to fight 101 ugly demons.

Some of the races in DA:O had great motivations, at least initially:

There are plenty of interesting elves, you just have to know where to look

http://www.baen.com/tanya.asp

Once upon a time, in the state of Mississippi, there dwelt an elf princess. The princess lived in the Enchanted Forest with her mother, the queen of the elves, in a ninety-foot long aluminum double-wide trailer.

"I'm bored, Momma," the princess of the elves whined. She was sitting on the couch and painting her toenails. The princess had been complaining a lot lately. "This is stupid, stupid and boring."

Queen Ilrondelia grunted and used the remote to turn up the volume on the TV so she wouldn't have to listen to her youngest and only daughter. It was an infomercial about some blanket thing with sleeve holes for your hands so you could sit all warm on the couch and still work the remote. The queen decided she needed one of those and wondered if they made it in her size.

"Tanya! Write down that number," the queen ordered. "I need one of them snuggly blankets for keeping warm."

"You ain't listening. How come you won't let me do nothing?" Tanya said.

"You wanna do something? Get that skinny ass offa' the couch and get a ink pen like I said!" the queen bellowed.

"Yes, your majesty," Tanya answered sullenly, got up, and went to the kitchen.

"And fetch me some Ho-Hos while you's at it..." the queen said, then thought about it. "And some ranch dressin' for dippin' sauce." She returned her attention to the TV. Tanya came back, but as usual, took her sweet time, so the phone number was gone, and the queen would be forced to wait on getting her snuggly blanket with sleeves, but she did bring the box of Ho-Hos and the bottle of ranch dressing like she'd been told. The queen took the snack and glared disapprovingly at Tanya's too-small shirt. "Your belly's stickin' out."

"It's fashion," Tanya said. "You're just jealous."

The queen snorted. Fashion. The girl had no sense. Tanya went back to the couch, but one of the cats had taken her spot. Tanya tossed it on the floor and went back to painting her toes.

The queen forgot about the TV for a minute and concentrated on her kid. She didn't do that very often. "So... You wanna do something'?" the queen asked.

Tanya sighed. "Yeah, I do."

"So the Enchanted Forest ain't good 'nuff no mo?"

"That ain't what I meant," Tanya said. "But elves used to do stuff. You know. Outside."

The queen of the elves pondered on that while she unwrapped a Ho-Ho and squirted ranch dressing on it. Her people had a sweet deal. The government paid them good money to stay right here in the Enchanted Forest, but some of the younger elves were getting uppity, talking about adventure. They'd been watching too many movies with fancy movie elves in them. They didn't realize how good they had it here in the Enchanted Forest.

The world had moved on. It wasn't a magic world no more. It was a world of techno-thingies and computing boxes and inter-webs. It wasn't a world fit for her kind.

The queen knew her youngest was going to be a problem child since she'd gotten that butterfly tramp-stamp tattooed on her back. Somehow she'd gotten it in her head that she wanted to "see the world" and such nonsense. She even talked to those damn pixies. Hell, the girl probably didn't have the smarts not to consort with a filthy orc if left on her own. But since Tanya was the prettiest girl in the trailer park she had all the boys wrapped around her finger. Her crazy talk could cause trouble. Trouble could make it so that the government checks quit coming.

The government didn't want people knowing about monsters or magic or the things that lived on the outskirts. Other than shopping at the Walmart, the Elves kept to themselves. All it would take was one dumb youngster to go and pull something stupid in town, and their sweet gig would be up. And with Tanya flouncing around like a cheap pixie, talking to humans, and sneaking out, it was only a matter of time. The princess was a pain in her ass.

I kinda get the impression that a lot of people here are just focusing on and responding to the title of this article rather then the article itself.

Dickdatduck:
I kinda get the impression that a lot of people here are just focusing on and responding to the title of this article rather then the article itself.

If I had to focus on the article I would've just pointed out that it already admits defeat before it even tried to state why "Occupation Was Better Than Race". It complains about how bad Risen 2 was before moving on.

Maybe he just played too many bad Elder Scrolls wannabes & needed to vent. But even then He'd probably enjoyed Skyrim more than he enjoyed Risen 2.

But putting that aside maybe he should write an open letter to Volition (Or Rockstar if he's that desperate) & ask for a pirate themed game. Although I'm guessing Volition would screw up by becoming too goofy. And Rockstar would fail at steering a giant ship.

Or maybe he should play Cutthroats: Battle For Black Powder Cove. The only problems there would be having to play with other people on PS Home.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dwEfKFs_BWk

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