Hype-er Time

Hype-er Time

Perhaps we know too much about how movies are made.

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Yep, I liked my life at the cinema much more without this information...

CURSE YOU INTERNET!

I was wondering when you'd say something regarding the GI Joe news. But yeah, interesting article. The internet has changed the way films are marketed now, and it'll probably change drastically in ways we can't imagine in the years to come. For good or ill.

Second page, third paragraph, it should be affecting, not effecting.

While it can be interesting knowing about a film's plagued production, I can just as easily ignore it. After all, all that matters is a) if it's good and b) if it performs well. I was glad to know how much WB spent on Green Lantern, cause that made things even more satisfying when it tanked. But I can easily live without such information.

I find it absolutely hilarious that executive meddling is making them unkill Duke in G.I. Joe:Retaliation just like it did for the 80s animated movie.

I have to agree: all this information is useful in discovering why a movie may not have worked but it still fails to impact what is seen on the screen. Either it works or it doesn't and the first order of business should be: Why does/doesn't this movie work as I am seeing it?

Once you get that out of the way, the reasons _for_ that why can become interesting but they aren't critical to 90% of the public.

So, when a movie studio (responding to fan outcry about how sucky some element in their movie is) goes away and re-shoots large chunks, changes things around, adds a new ending or removes a character; that's okay and there is no media outcry about the "entitlement" of those fans interfering with the "artistic vision" of the people making the movie.

But when a game studio (responding to fan outcry about how sucky some element in their game is, like the ending for example) goes away and "clarifies" the element in question there is a massive media outcry about the "entitlement" of those fans interfering with the "artistic vision" of the people making the game.

Interesting world we live in.

Going back to The Dark Knight Rises, think about how our perception changed when the first leaked photos of catwoman hit the net. The subsequent outrage kind of left a bad taste in our mouths before the trailers even came out. Now that they have, all that people talk about is how uninteresting and boring catwoman is.

Cartographer:
So, when a movie studio (responding to fan outcry about how sucky some element in their movie is) goes away and re-shoots large chunks, changes things around, adds a new ending or removes a character; that's okay and there is no media outcry about the "entitlement" of those fans interfering with the "artistic vision" of the people making the movie.

But when a game studio (responding to fan outcry about how sucky some element in their game is, like the ending for example) goes away and "clarifies" the element in question there is a massive media outcry about the "entitlement" of those fans interfering with the "artistic vision" of the people making the game.

Interesting world we live in.

No one ever said it was okay. In fact, it's just as vapid and stupid. It's why Brazil's theatrical release had such a shitty ending.

Anyone notice how much louder Bane is in the new trailer? I still can't understand half of what he's saying, but now it went from mumbling to MUMBLING AMPED. Exactly the wrong reaction to have to fan backlash.

"Ignorance is bliss."
I can see how going into a movie as a regular, popcorn eating schmuck might be more enjoyable. When you aren't burdened and weighed down with baggage like scandal and production hell.

Baggage that can turn one into a pretentious snob, over time.

So if I have any real interest in a film, I generally try to avoid any buzz or rumors about it.

And yet, Snob I sometimes am: just through exposure to the internet I've picked up on a lot of filming techniques (and exploitation) that the film business employs.
For some, this might ruin the experience; like how taking a toy apart to reveal the works makes it seem mundane and boring.

Yet, for me, this makes movies interesting to watch in an entirely different manner. I marveled (pun not intended) at The Avengers' competent use of tradecraft, directing, and pacing. It's not just a popcorn action movie for me, it's a fun piece of analysis AND a good action film.

Conversely, I groan and writhe under derivative, bland, agonizing nonsense from the likes of Battle: Los Angeles and Battleshitp. Movies that are obviously trying to ape some other popular style for a quick buck. Movies that have a huge budget, but no personality or ambition of their own.

THOSE are the movies I keep tabs on; the Battleships and Green Lanterns; where the "baggage" is likely to be the most interesting part of the movie.

The same happens with TV like when everyone found out Dan Harmon got fired so now they are not gonna watch just out of expectation that it will be crap now.

Well done. That was a good read.

It does seem that lately the pre-show hype is actually more popular than the movie itself.

I feel like all of the Batman set photos and "leaks" that have been happening to Dark Knight Rises have been very calculated. We've seen the costumes, the football scene, and the thing with the Bat-plane. Yet with all of those things, do we really know anything about the movie outside of the same stuff the trailers and TV commercials showed us?

Django Unchained seems to be going down a similar path. I was shocked that the script had "leaked," but they could really prevent that stuff from getting out if they really wanted. And nothing seemed to stop quite a few pro journalists from writing reviews of the script. We've heard about actors leaving the production, but nothing about why and certainly nothing that would paint the movie in a negative light. Now we have photos coming out? It's not even done filming, I don't think. This movie probably won't even be released until 2013.

I think studios are starting to get one step ahead of the hype train. "Leak" a thing or two here or there and string people along for the duration of production. Everyone who loved Dark Knight wanted to know about a sequel, so we were getting "news" about it right after the movie came out. Everyone who liked Inglourious Basterds wanted to know what was next, and it wasn't long before Tarantino let a few details slip in interviews.

MovieBob:

...a setup whose chore list was alleged to have included writing Channing Tatum's "Duke" out of the series. (Tatum having been resting on the "handsome actors male film geeks feel obligated to despise" list at the time of the original film.)

To paraphrase what another internet critic said in regards to the complaints about Tatum: He has absolutely no on-screen charisma, and that's why he's so reviled.

There was no "obligation" to dislike him, he was just a natural wet blanket (i.e. Orlando Bloom in the first three Pirates films).

The deliberate leaks theory zelda2fanboy mentioned makes sense to me. Personally, I've started avoiding reading about or watching videos about upcoming movies beyond a trailer or two. It's more fun to go in without knowing too much about it. Of course, I like reading everything I can find on the subject afterwards. (tvtropes usually covers that. :-)

Scrythe:

MovieBob:

...a setup whose chore list was alleged to have included writing Channing Tatum's "Duke" out of the series. (Tatum having been resting on the "handsome actors male film geeks feel obligated to despise" list at the time of the original film.)

To paraphrase what another internet critic said in regards to the complaints about Tatum: He has absolutely no on-screen charisma, and that's why he's so reviled.

There was no "obligation" to dislike him, he was just a natural wet blanket (i.e. Orlando Bloom in the first three Pirates films).

Disagree on both counts. Based on his roles so far I don't have reason to believe that Channing Tatum is a very versatile actor, but I've certainly enjoyed most of his performances. As for Orlando Bloom, his character was a little bland, but it worked well with Jack Sparrow.

This kind of hype is your bread and butter Bob. It's the reason I watch Escape to the Movies; not for your opinion, but for all the behind the scenes connections and industry rationale that you make. Keep up the good work.

"the mainstream entertainment press will be less concerned with Batman's defeat of Bane"

It's so pervasive that everyone who read this now knows who the main bad guy will be...
I wish I could go back to watching stuff completely unspoiled, like when I was a kid.

But then again, I'd be scared to be out of the loop for some reason. :(

It's a tough call for me. I see the argument being made but find that I actually prefer knowing more about the behind the scenes stuff. I like having part of my judgement of a movie be based upon how it's being made and who's involved rather than solely on the white washed finished product.

Cartographer:
So, when a movie studio (responding to fan outcry about how sucky some element in their movie is) goes away and re-shoots large chunks, changes things around, adds a new ending or removes a character; that's okay and there is no media outcry about the "entitlement" of those fans interfering with the "artistic vision" of the people making the movie.

But when a game studio (responding to fan outcry about how sucky some element in their game is, like the ending for example) goes away and "clarifies" the element in question there is a massive media outcry about the "entitlement" of those fans interfering with the "artistic vision" of the people making the game.

Interesting world we live in.

You forgot the part about how one movie doing that suddenly and instantly invalidates the entire medium as an artform.

Cartographer:
So, when a movie studio (responding to fan outcry about how sucky some element in their movie is) goes away and re-shoots large chunks, changes things around, adds a new ending or removes a character; that's okay and there is no media outcry about the "entitlement" of those fans interfering with the "artistic vision" of the people making the movie.

But when a game studio (responding to fan outcry about how sucky some element in their game is, like the ending for example) goes away and "clarifies" the element in question there is a massive media outcry about the "entitlement" of those fans interfering with the "artistic vision" of the people making the game.

Interesting world we live in.

True, but I think this is more that the movie studio saw that there was a cash cow to be milked and got their grubby little retconning hands all over it.

Apart from pre-production hype, pre-knowledge about any movie can definitely make or break a person's opinion of the movie. I think most of the time, people who've experienced the source material tend to think the movie adaptation is pretty shit. E.g. Bob, never having watched the ATLA series (or so I'm pretty sure) thought the Shyamalan movie was decent. Everyone I know who had watched the show thought the movie was an abomination.

Although you, Bob, have certainly had pre-production hype ruin your expectations of a film. In your licensing episode of The Big Picture, the rumors about the new Spiderman movie sound like they're already making you dread it. :P

The solution seems pretty simple, at least for the moviegoers who aren't professionally obligated to keep up with all the minutae. Just stop paying so much attention to the meaningless rubbish about the movie industry.

Yes, meaningless.

I'm not knocking you, Bob - you are unfortunately cursed by your chosen career to have to care about this stuff. But for the rest of us, it's easy. Put down the gossip magazine, stop following all the inside scoop on an industry which has zero bearing on your life, and heck - stop even watching trailers, since these days they tend to obliterate any surprises or enjoyment that the movie may hold.

Just watch the movies. Enjoy them or hate them simply for what they are.

Kenjitsuka:

I wish I could go back to watching stuff completely unspoiled, like when I was a kid.

But then again, I'd be scared to be out of the loop for some reason. :(

You can, it just takes some effort.

For the Avengers movie, I didn't even know that Loki was in it. I had completely avoided trailers, reviews, articles, all of that stuff. I really enjoyed Iron Man 1 & 2, and Thor, and Captain America, so I knew I wanted to see the movie. And as soon as I knew that, then finding out anything else about it beforehand would only diminish my enjoyment of it.

mikespoff:
stop even watching trailers, since these days they tend to obliterate any surprises or enjoyment that the movie may hold.

That is so true! I remember when watching trailers was something I enjoyed, but nowadays I avoid them like the plague because they are so full of spoilers. The same thing has happened to books, now either every big plot point is given away on the cover, or it's just meaningless praise from a bunch of people whose opinions I really don't care about.

Although I did know that Loki would be in the Avengers, but not from trailers, from the post-credits of Thor. Post-credits scenes are the only trailers I watch.

 

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