Get Back Up

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Get Back Up

Another way to look at the controversial Tomb Raider trailer.

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I agree, what's more I think this makes Lara a more interesting hero and this a more interesting story than in most games ever.

In the end it stops being brave or exciting or virtuous to see badass videogame protagonists survive yet another explosion, yet another helicopter crash landing. All it means is that in those universes, explosions don't mean much, conflict doesn't mean much, pain doesn't mean much. They're not tough, because being tough means that there is some genuine struggle going on there.

In the end, one of the most iconic heroes ever is Solid Snake/Big Boss etc and whilst they had their moments of awesome they spent a lot of time dealing with hardship as well. Big Boss was a badass because he got his eye cut out and it hurt but he dealt with it. Would MGS4 have been as great if it wasn't Snake being pushed beyond every limit he had and we could see that they were genuine limits. He almost didn't make it across the microwave chamber and that's what makes the difference and is a much more grown up and interesting story, when things really are difficult they really are hard.

And it means Lara will genuinely have an arc. Rather than being the generic protagonist whose a hero just because she is or Backstory! she'll become a hero because she was put in an impossible situation and she had to grow and survive or die. I've never cared about Ms Croft before (her 'personality' wasn't the most interesting character trait before) but now not only do I care, but if they pull this off, she'll be a turning point for gaming and iconic for a deserving reason

Another agreement here.

Most of the dissent I'm hearing comes from the folks that want to quietly keep the male-centric sexualization of female videogame characters... so they try to repackage that particular turd as newly-polished, and tell us how that was real empowerment and this is just wrong.

What's more, I'm hearing the same people try to tell us that this new material is a problem because it shows a weaker Lara. To this, I can only ask: what do these people think strength is, and where do they think it comes from?

EDIT: Also agreed that the "You want to protect her" comments are waaaay off base. Here's someone who, seeing a game do something right -- that is, present a strong, dynamic female character that anyone can relate to -- over-explaining things to the "usual" audience. In doing so, he undermines the potential triumph... and insults that same audience.

We, as male gamers, are capable of relating to a female character in most situations. Do we always prefer to? Probably not, just like I doubt most women prefer stepping into male shoes when they play games. But to behave as though we're incapable insults women (What? Are they aliens?) and men (What? Are we moronic cavemen?) alike.

Thanks for weighing in. Nice article.

I want to take this article, frame it and forever and ever hang it on the wall because it is so good.

It's really nice to read an article that does seem to get what this reboot is trying to convey. I myself was shocked at the negative fan response the trailer was getting. As you mentioned the in the article, I think a good handful of the people watching the trailer missed the main point of the trailer/game.

This game actually makes Lara look and act more human. Which is by far, more relatable than what she was like in previous titles. If anything this game makes Lara seem even more tough in a sense (and maybe not at first). Just thinking about the a situation like the one she's in; I'm not sure I could do it. It takes a lot of strength/courage to keep going when on the brink of death/intense pain. It makes Lara seem more like a true heroine that everybody can relate to. Before she was still a bad ass, but that's all she was ( that and eye candy for dudes ), I think this story will make her become a true heroine.

I get why people are upset, I really do. But I would rather not focus on what's knocking Lara down, and instead applaud the way she keeps getting back up.

I'm in awe, bravo Susan, bravo.

I was indifferent to the Tomb Raider reboot but after reading this I have a new perspective on it, and I'm optimistic of the outcome, might get it myself thanks to this article actually.

Of course there's also the fact that we've gotten used to the original version of Lara, having her be so helpless feels like a betrayal of the character herself.

The thing that bothers me is the way it keeps getting thrown in our faces. She almost drowns on the ship hammering on the safety hatch, wakes up wrapped in a cocoon, escapes only to be impaled in the fall, has to make her way back through the cave crying to herself "how am I going to get out of here?", not to mention her captures repeatedly jumping out and grabbing her even while the cave collapses around her. WE GET IT! SHE'S NEW AT THIS! STOP KNOCKING HER DOWN FOR ONE SECOND!

This should have been a new IP. The story they're trying to tell might have merit, but it's a bad fit for Lara Croft, just as Mario would be a bad choice for a character to explore the effect of the economic downturn on Brooklyn plumbers. I'm a long term fan of the franchise, from the first game through to Underworld, and I've never expected more from the story than a fun b-movie narrative that lets Lara go to exotic locations and shoot dinosaurs. There's a distinct lack of dinosaurs in these trailers.

I also don't trust Crystal Dynamics to tell this story in a way that doesn't come across as crass and exploitative. This isn't the first E3 trailer - there was one in 2011 that was just as fixated on Lara in peril, Lara in pain, Lara frightened...

Here's a quote from the Penny Arcade interview

"You see that in the beginning of the game, where we begin to build her up and give her confidence to cross the ledge, cross the plane, she forages for food and she's feeling really successful. Then towards the end we start to really hit her, and to break her down. Her best friend is kidnapped, she's taken hostage, she's almost raped, we put her in this position where we turned her into a cornered animal."

'Towards the end', which reads to me like 'let's torture Lara' is going to be the running theme for most of this game.

Like I said, make it a new IP and I really woudn't care, but if they really want to revive the Tomb Raider franchise they should forget the gritty realism and psychological depth and give us a good game.

Preferably one that involves shooting dinosaurs.

Sixcess:
This should have been a new IP. The story they're trying to tell might have merit, but it's a bad fit for Lara Croft, just as Mario would be a bad choice for a character to explore the effect of the economic downturn on Brooklyn plumbers.

Not to sidetrack your (valid, IMHO) point but that comment reminded me of the excrementous Mario Bros. II where the brothers give up on plumbing and work for a thankless jerk making cakes.

Sixcess:
This should have been a new IP. The story they're trying to tell might have merit, but it's a bad fit for Lara Croft, just as Mario would be a bad choice for a character to explore the effect of the economic downturn on Brooklyn plumbers. I'm a long term fan of the franchise, from the first game through to Underworld, and I've never expected more from the story than a fun b-movie narrative that lets Lara go to exotic locations and shoot dinosaurs. There's a distinct lack of dinosaurs in these trailers.

I also don't trust Crystal Dynamics to tell this story in a way that doesn't come across as crass and exploitative. This isn't the first E3 trailer - there was one in 2011 that was just as fixated on Lara in peril, Lara in pain, Lara frightened...

Here's a quote from the Penny Arcade interview

"You see that in the beginning of the game, where we begin to build her up and give her confidence to cross the ledge, cross the plane, she forages for food and she's feeling really successful. Then towards the end we start to really hit her, and to break her down. Her best friend is kidnapped, she's taken hostage, she's almost raped, we put her in this position where we turned her into a cornered animal."

'Towards the end', which reads to me like 'let's torture Lara' is going to be the running theme for most of this game.

Like I said, make it a new IP and I really woudn't care, but if they really want to revive the Tomb Raider franchise they should forget the gritty realism and psychological depth and give us a good game.

Preferably one that involves shooting dinosaurs.

Actually, the 2011 demo was more about showcasing the quick-time events...which are problematic, but for completely other reasons. (I really hope most of the gameplay isn't like that.)

I absolutely understand the concern that CD won't handle this well, especially when you consider Rosenberg's comments. He doesn't seem to understand Lara or her audience at all. However, the concept in and of itself is a fantastic one for Lara, so I disagree that this should've been new IP. The Lara we're used to - the Tomb Raider - has gotten a bit boring. She's so bloody perfect that there aren't many new directions to take her. She needed a bit of humanizing in order to make her interesting beyond merely someone exploring pretty locations and finding shiny treasure. Uncharted may have been imitating Tomb Raider when it came out, but it did such a damn good job of it - and providing us with characters to actual care about - that the Tomb Raider series need to respond in kind if it was going to be competitive with the Uncharted series.

I'm not guaranteeing that this reboot will be any good, because there's still plenty that could go wrong with the actual execution of the game. But I'm glad they're making the attempt.

Nice to see someone who gets it.

...

Who, in fact, seems to get it a lot more than I do. My reasoning had only got about as far as your third paragraph.

Great article and I think everyone who has reservations about the game because of the scene in the trailer should read this.

It's nice to see that some developer at least is making an attempt to make a female character, albeit a rather famous one, fight for herself when shit hits the fan and become stronger for it. Probably why I love Heather Mason and Jade as much as I do, but it's cool how CD is trying to make Lara relatable.

I hope they don't screw this up, but points for trying.

Susan Arendt:
I absolutely understand the concern that CD won't handle this well, especially when you consider Rosenberg's comments. He doesn't seem to understand Lara or her audience at all.

Agreed.

However, the concept in and of itself is a fantastic one for Lara, so I disagree that this should've been new IP. The Lara we're used to - the Tomb Raider - has gotten a bit boring. She's so bloody perfect that there aren't many new directions to take her. She needed a bit of humanizing in order to make her interesting beyond merely someone exploring pretty locations and finding shiny treasure. Uncharted may have been imitating Tomb Raider when it came out, but it did such a damn good job of it - and providing us with characters to actual care about - that the Tomb Raider series need to respond in kind if it was going to be competitive with the Uncharted series.

I can see where you're coming from and it's a fair point. Lara is a relic of an era of gaming when characterisation in action-adventure games was minimal at best - usually limited to a few short cutscenes during the game. The idea that she needs to be updated a bit isn't a bad one. I'm just leery of the direction it seems to be going in as it feels more like a deconstruction of the character than a reconstruction.

I'm not guaranteeing that this reboot will be any good, because there's still plenty that could go wrong with the actual execution of the game. But I'm glad they're making the attempt.

It's one of the only long running franchises I really follow so I'd love to see it make a triumphant return. I just wish CD would give me something/anything to cheer for.

Doesn't have to be a dinosaur getting gunned down. I'd settle for a living statue...

Nice article!

As I said in a previous thread, if Lara 'grows' in this game, and becomes an ultimate badass by end game, I think this game would be FANTASTIC.

I'm not too fond of her being weak/wary the whole way through though. Some about that rubs me the wrong way

I genuinley never thought I would say "Lara Croft is an interesting/relatable character"... this makes me happy I was wrong.

Did anyone else have "Press X to not be raped" pop into their mind, when they read the first sentence of the second to last paragraph?
Or am I just a horrible person?

Honestly, I understand why some might be a little ticked, but I watched the trailer and in the 3 seconds of looming sexual assult the

*SPOILER*

scumbag in question brushs Lara's thigh, to which she responds by BITING THE PRICKS EAR OFF!!! She then proceeds to wrestle with him, shooting him with his own gun, who dominates these seconds? I know its an uncomfortable subject but its not mean't to be comfortable, she could get raped. She seems desperate and human in these seconds which makes it all the more impressive that she comes out on top, thats what a badass is.

Sixcess:

However, the concept in and of itself is a fantastic one for Lara, so I disagree that this should've been new IP. The Lara we're used to - the Tomb Raider - has gotten a bit boring. She's so bloody perfect that there aren't many new directions to take her. She needed a bit of humanizing in order to make her interesting beyond merely someone exploring pretty locations and finding shiny treasure. Uncharted may have been imitating Tomb Raider when it came out, but it did such a damn good job of it - and providing us with characters to actual care about - that the Tomb Raider series need to respond in kind if it was going to be competitive with the Uncharted series.

I can see where you're coming from and it's a fair point. Lara is a relic of an era of gaming when characterisation in action-adventure games was minimal at best - usually limited to a few short cutscenes during the game. The idea that she needs to be updated a bit isn't a bad one. I'm just leery of the direction it seems to be going in as it feels more like a deconstruction of the character than a reconstruction.

I've never been a big Lara Croft fan, so I was wondering if you could explain which direction it should have gone in in updating/giving Lara 's/a character?

I think they're working in quite a small space to be honest, Nathan Drake so curb-stomped the whole franchise that it would be very hard to just update her without being a Nathan Drake rip-off.

Although I admit I'm so enamoured with this story idea that I'm finding it hard to think straight on the issue. I tried to brainstorm ideas for a few minutes and I was struggling to think of any character that wouldn't have a huge hardship focus.

Which I think is maybe why I'm loving this so much, we've never really had a character in games ever. People pointed out in Uncharted how absurd it is that this wacky happy go lucky everyman also kills 800 people and strugs off every blow with ease. I don't think there's a character type in existence that would act towards events the way game protagonists do. Even if we imagine a complete embittered veteran, whose seen everything and has been completely numbed to his life style... there's still inherent in that a huge focus on the awfulness of the situation he's in that he's so numb too.

Indiana Jones isn't really a personality. What can you say about him? Humans are much more defined in the way they deal with problems and hardships yet in all this sort of thing, but these characters don't do that, instead the universe just pretends these things aren't a hardship.

The most character Drake's ever been given is when he was clutching at the bullet wound in his stomach struggling his way out of a train wreck in the frozen snow, trying just to go on.

So why not Lara? If every game in history (except MGS4) has failed to properly flesh out their characters (okay some exaggeration here, for instance in RPGs the protagonist generally has quite a hard time or hard points, the difference being the focus on RPGs is with the world and with action-adventure games the environment, leading to different types of hardship) why not use this one? Lara Croft was dead, her franchise despite producing very solid games was unable to attract people based on her alone. As Susan pointed out, and this is something that Lara has already done before.

Lara Croft was invented when people decided that instead of having this fairy-wish fulfillment fantasy plumber it was more interesting to have a human being. And whats more instead of the bog standard action hero, why not a women?

And this is just that again, if every gain has these fantasy badass tanks, why not have someone who actually struggles and has setbacks? And if Lara Croft was a women in a sea of macho-thugs why not capitalise on that and show that the weakness can be more interesting than Alpha Male strength?

Rape is awful I just hope the game handles it sensitively

Great point of view, fantastic article.
I should definitely share this one around to people who are up in arms at the trailer.

This will never stop bothering me.

So, women want to be equal. Okay.

Women want to be strong and stuff. Okay.

Women don't want men to be sexist. Bullshit, but okay.

But, hurting a girl is still worse than hurting a man. It's okay to impale a guy on a pole, but it's bad to do it to a lady. Even in a videogame. Um... Okay?

Girls are taught to survive shyness, embarrassment, and truth or dare. The books aren't meant to be taken seriously, but the message comes through loud and clear, just the same: When it comes to the dangerous stuff, let the boys handle it.

No, the message I see is this one: Girls, don't be fucking retarded. If you want to hunt snakes, then go fucking hunt snakes instead of whining why only men hunt snakes. Indeed like Lara, kinda.

I'm glad to see someone actually taking a reasonable approach to this. This whole situation is ridiculous.

Hey guys, remember at the end of FEAR 2 where Beckett gets fairly graphically raped by Alma, both physically and mentally, while you're controlling him no less? And do you remember the massive manufactured outrage over that? Oh, there was no outrage? Right, I wonder what the key difference there could have been.

Agree pretty much wholeheartedly with what Arendt wrote, and I believe I have posted more or less the same opinions in fewer words here on the forums. Both that I believe in the new Lara, and that Rosenberg's comments on the subject were pretty damn terrible.

I still have hope that the remade Lara Croft can become a modern Ellen Ripley of sorts. And that the game will come with some fresh new gameplay for the franchise.

BrotherRool:
I've never been a big Lara Croft fan, so I was wondering if you could explain which direction it should have gone in in updating/giving Lara 's/a character?

I'm not sure, but it would definitely have involved shooting dinosaurs.

*cough*

Okay, maybe not.

More seriously, I'd have played up the supernatural/horror aspects. If you want to make a young and inexperienced Lara afraid of something then make her afraid of undead spirits, or monsters, not sweaty dudes with guns. Play it slow at first, with an emphasis on atmosphere, exploration, puzzle solving. In fact if I was doing the reboot I'd likely have few or no human enemies - the prevalence of them in the later games of the series was arguably when it started to lose direction.

So... quick pitch: Lara gets shipwrecked on an uncharted (no pun intended) island. She's salvaged a shortwave radio and manages to communicate with someone on the other side of the island. It's not clear who they are but they say they can help her - if she can get to them, because they can't come to her. It sets up a nice mystery for later on, and in the meantime she's got people to talk to, to show character development (and provide exposition.)

The beach where she's landed is surrounded on all sides by unscalable cliffs. The people on the radio tell her that the island is riddled with ancient catacombs built god knows when by god knows who. If she wants to get up the cliffs, and across the island she will have to enter those catacombs, and they are huge - the entire island being the centre of some long forgotten death cult. Essentially she's shipwrecked on R'yleh. Not literally of course, but in the general feel of it.

Etc etc. Just my idea.

Edit: all of which is a long way of saying I have nothing in theory against the character arc that's apparently being plotted out, but I do not like the tone in which it's being done, as it's all too gritty and real for Tomb Raider.

And this is just that again, if every gain has these fantasy badass tanks, why not have someone who actually struggles and has setbacks? And if Lara Croft was a women in a sea of macho-thugs why not capitalise on that and show that the weakness can be more interesting than Alpha Male strength?

It's very true that the needs of gameplay have almost always led to the jarring disconnect between the character you see in the cutscenes and the character you play in the game. As Ross Scott of Freeman's Mind said, realistically the only way Gordon could survive the story of Half Life is if he was a paranoid homicidal sociopath, because normal people don't adapt that quickly to gunning down dozens of people.

There's nothing inherently wrong with playing with an audience's perceptions of a well known character, but only if there's a good pay off at the end. I'd cite Casino Royale as a good example in that they played with the expectations of Bond fans throughout the film, but then delivered an absolutely knockout ending that kept true to the character without diminishing the changes that were made to bring him up to date.

I just don't think CD have the skill to pull something like that off, and the relentless emphasis being placed on Lara's vulnerability in everything we see and everything they say does not reassure me one bit.

I agree with most of the piece, but this part sticks in my throat a bit.

I understand why people are troubled by the trailer - watching a young girl in pain is difficult. It should be difficult. You're not supposed to see a girl get impaled and think "Hell, yeah, that's cool!" - though there are certainly people out there doing just that. If you feel uncomfortable watching scenes of Lara in peril, that doesn't mean the trailer is foul, it means that you're a decent human being who doesn't like to watch suffering.

Right after this:

Their ire was fueled when Ron Rosenberg, the game's executive producer, made some pretty dumb comments about players not identifying with Lara, instead wanting to "protect her." Rosenberg came off sounding like a condescending chauvinist who doesn't understand the first thing about the player's relationship with Lara

You're right, Lara is a young girl, and it is uncomfortable to watch her in the situations portrayed. In fact, I think it's safe to say that many people who don't fall into the "Hell, yeah, that's cool!" crowd would want to protect a young girl from just that kind of situation. It's not chauvinistic when basic human instinct kicks in to protect a young person. Saying that somebody is chauvinistic or dumb to want to protect a young girl is tantamount to endorsing the "Hell, yeah, that's cool!" crowd. Like stated, a decent person isn't going to want to see another person suffer. You can relate and sympathize at the same time.

She triumphed over adversity by escaping said implied 'rape', yet everyone's still white-knighting their way towards the armory.

A bad person in the far reaches of jungley-nowhere has a female prisoner who was just caught trying to escape. What do you think was going to happen? Him giving her a cookie? She's attractive, vulnerable, and he's obviously taken an interest.

Rape is unacceptable in the real world, but that doesn't mean we should shun any idea out of principal just because we don't like it. If that were the case, no one should be killing each other in video games, either.

I could practically feel the feminist preaching pouring from your words from about the third paragraph on. You don't need to give me a sermon on a subject like that - the "strong-willed, confident woman" model isn't exactly a new concept in today's world. It might be more so on the Internet or in video games, but that's mostly because one bad apple/sexist that thinks he's writing a '50s movie spoils it for the rest, usually on 4chan, reddit, or in YouTube comments. :/

Regardless, I see the points you're making, and the article as a whole has a good point, as far as the trailer is concerned. It made me feel better about the fact that I, too, was a little disgusted by some of the situations the trailer showed off. I'm kinda squeamish about blood and all that stuff to begin with (yeah, and I play main-stream video games, go figure), so knowing that lots of people most likely felt that way makes me relax a bit. I didn't read Rosenberg's comments on the fans' reactions to the trailer, but from the impression that I got here, there's really no excuse for that sort of behavior.

I might end up picking up this reboot (probably after a price drop or something), but I doubt I'll ever be able to play it without feeling a little uneasy with it. I doubt it'll be because of Lara's injuries, though. By this point, I'm used to the fact that video game characters (in particular, the protagonists) will be in some form of danger down the line, and they can't exactly get out of those situations without a scratch on them. There'll be some blood, there'll be some injuries, and people will die. That's practically a given here.

Where my concern lies is in the fact that Rule 34 will apply, and in the back of my head, I'll know that someone, somewhere, is getting off to the fact that Lara's in pain. The fact that I even have any concern for something like that probably means that humanity has failed, but I think that most of us can agree that we don't want this reboot to be encouraging to the sick-minded tendencies of society's future sexists, or worse, future rapists.

So like I said, good article, good points. It doesn't really help me with the wariness I described above, but if the game's psychological mood and cinematic quality are executed well, I'll probably be able to put that thought out of my mind...for a time, at least.

I certainly wasn't put off by the tone of the trailer, quite the opposite in fact. However, if there is one thing at this stage that I fear will get in the way of a more 'human' Lara, it's her bloody voice acting. It just comes off in the trailer as so... shrill, and whiny. Granted, she has pretty damn good reason to whine for most of it, but what I'm sure is supposed to be a desperate, harrowing tone that helps us sympathise with her just comes off as annoying, and rather ditzy too.

For example: In the part where she shoots the deer the "I'm sorry" that she exclaims just before she takes the shot with the bow comes off as so forced and more than a little stupid. Even if you are, like this version of Lara, totally out of your depth and traumatised, if you're forced into a situation where you need to hunt wild animals to survive then you wouldn't say that. It's a necessity, and at that point you'd probably be so hungry that actually, your instincts wouldn't allow you to be sorry. Even if you were, you wouldn't say it, out loud, when you're just meters away from your prey that will run away if it gets spooked, especially if you're not an expert with a bow and getting the shot just right will require all your focus and the total element of surprise.

I'm not saying this from the perspective of some expert hunter or survival specialist, but this really isn't rocket science. There's a fine line between being vulnerable, and just being dim.

What annoys me about the whole kaffufle is that people are complaining about her not being the badass she was in the other games, saying it's sexist because Lara is female.

If it was an origins story about a male who wasn't as strong as he was in his other games, no one would be calling it sexist. Sure some people would be pissed off that they're not playing as the badass they love, but no one would call it sexist.

I highly doubt Lara was born badass, an origins story that deals with her character being scared and vulnerable, in situations she's not used to makes perfect sense.

Susan Arendt:
Rosenberg came off sounding like a condescending chauvinist who doesn't understand the first thing about the player's relationship with Lara.

Actually, I think the guy sounds like someone who completely understands a male player's relationship with a completely inexperienced, 21-year-old female character who they are playing as in the third-person. And that 'relationship' is one in which you are very much aware of the character (as opposed to being immersed in them), want to have the power to remove the character from horrific situations, and are then granted said power.

And that's then amplified by the fact that, as a man, I have never felt like I've been sexually-harassed. Not once, and I suspect that on the whole, the majority of guys feel that too - the number of women who will feel that way will likely be less. In a rape scene where a guy is attacking a woman, it means my focus is in fact on the rapist, not the victim; my response is "get the fuck off her!", not one of feeling relatable to the victim in that situation. It's the subtle but, I think, distinct difference between 'he's raping her' and 'she's being raped by him'. And that's where the protection angle comes in when it comes to guys relating to female characters.

(Thinking about it, this could probably spin into a lengthy discussion about creating character-development when the character is technically not the one controlling a lot of their actions.)

I think the true intent of his comments can be seen when he talks about 'rooting for Lara', the idea that you're willing her on and engaging that 'protectionist' side of things as a way of developing empathy and engaging with the character's struggle. There is nothing wrong with acknowledging that men and women will react differently to characters of the opposite sex, even if they still end up feeling empathy for them.

I can see how Rosenberg's comments can be construed as sexist (although I seriously question how much the article has done to spice things up a little), but I think that if you sit back and think about everything from what we know of what the game's wanting to do, to the way that article is written, it's far clearer as to what the guy's getting at. Likewise, I think the 'help' comment is referencing the fact that you are a player who is playing the game - you are involved in the struggles of the character, and since you aren't under the impression that you are the character (because of gender and camera-view), you're therefore an outside force.

Anyway, the rest of your piece, I pretty much agree with. If we criticise developers for including elements before we've even seen them within the context of the full game, then you may as well say games are for kids, and that they're not allowed to be as mature as films or novels.

If, when the game comes out, it turns out that Lara's even more 2-dimensional than before (... personality-wise) and that the game is simply a constant onslaught of being overpowered by men and having the living shit beaten out of her non-stop, then there'll be something to complain about.

I think this whole thing has been spurned on by the two other recent (although in their cases, legitimate) issues pertaining to women in gaming - the dreadful Hitman trailer, and the reaction to the documentary Kickstarter - and people have perhaps become a little caught up in the commotion.

DVS BSTrD:
Of course there's also the fact that we've gotten used to the original version of Laura, having her be so helpless feels like a betrayal of the character herself.

A valid point, but in my opinion this Lara seems like a far cooler character than her future self. They seem to have humanized her a lot in the sense that she seems more approachable. Also, it's "Lara"... "LARA", drop the "U".

Susan Arendt:
Get Back Up

Another way to look at the controversial Tomb Raider trailer.

Read Full Article

I agree so much with this article, although there is one point that I don't and that is the point about if you don't feel emotions for her then you're not a decent human being. Perhaps I am in the minority here but I watched the trailer and I never looked at Lara as in trouble like that, I have separated what is real and what is fiction and I didn't feel any sympathy for her.
Does that make me a bad human being?

I do however feel quite compelled when I see her getting up every time, it's a strange reversal from no concern of the injury but I want to applaud as it goes on and on.
I think part of me finds the lack of perfection appealing, frankly I'm sick of video games who have their heroes in dire straights and they don't look worse for wear at all. The image of Lara falling down a cliff took me aback for a second, I thought to myself that had this been the old TR then she would have been sliding down that gradient instead of tumbling.
To me this is trailer is more inspiring than anything I have ever seen from the video games industry, Lara is human.

Susan Arendt:
Get Back Up

Another way to look at the controversial Tomb Raider trailer.

Read Full Article

YES!!!! somone gets it

seeing a charachters struggles is what makes us give a crap...which is somthing I really liked in ME3 where Femshep really was under preasure

and as for that "rape scene" I think people were over reacting..as if it was somthing from "girl with the dragon tatoo" but all it was, was a few seconds of implication, and in that situation of coarse its a possibility

Sixcess:
This should have been a new IP

I don't think theres anything wrong with putting a new spin on a charachter or IP, somtimes it can be just the thing thats needed

and in this case...I think a "female protagonist we can empathise with" would have had a better shot with an established IP..since as we know AAA is so adverse to taking risks

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