Near Miss

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I was honestly very disappointed in this movie. It had a lot of potential to do something different or at least fun and interesting that we don't see often.

Unfortunately, that was not the case. It was a good movie, but not a Pixar movie.

I share the arrow analogy, Bob. Looks like Pixar won't win the princess' hand, but it was a very good try.

And with Monsters University on the horizon, is it safe to say that Pixar's era of innovation is either ending or on a down-curve?

You know, I didn't see the whole "girl power" thing when I watched this as some seem to contend.

The one instance Merida proved it wasn't to show "girls can do better" was just to get her out of having to marry someone she didn't want to. And it didn't seem like she learned archery because she wanted to be better than the boys - she just developed a passion for it because she learned it from her father as a little girl.

If there's one thing that was mighty refreshing about it, it showed a decent relationship between the girl and her father, and strained, but loving, between the girl and her (living and not evil) mother-figure (not even a stepmother, who knew).

I liked it, but I do agree with Bob that it wasn't what it could have been. (It was better than Cars, which I didn't hate, and Ratatouille, which I wasn't impressed with.)

Still, some of the best music I'm sure I'll hear at the movies this year, if only because I have a fondness for Celtic music.

Honestly I wasn't sure what to expect when I went in, cause the trailers only showed the parts from the beginning of the film. I was pleasantly surprised by the direction they took with Merida and Elinor. Pixar did say that this was going to be a fairy tale, and in the end that is what it felt like.

That being said, about the advertising, I'm not quite sold on the notion of "we didn't want to spoil the movie." I remember they did similar marketing with Tangled, where the trailers showed crazy hijinks, including the princess beating the crap out of the lead guy with her hair, all in a comical fashion. Yet that's only a small portion of the movie; the rest is a heart-warming fairy tale that you really didn't see coming. I remember Nostalgia Chick bringing this up and contemplating how Disney resorted to "Dreamworks advertising" to put asses in seats rather than try to entice the audience with what they really had to offer, and I can't help but feel as if they did the same thing for Brave. Merida and Elinor's plight was what made the movie enjoyable, not her reaction to the crazy boys. Should Disney really continue with this kind of advertising, especially when it gives people the wrong expectations?

I think I might enjoy this movie anyway. It sounds like it spends some decent time on character development, which I adore.

Wait, Brave is set in medieval Scotland? Huh. From what I've seen of the artwork on posters and cutouts, I really thought it was going to be set in Ireland during the Iron age. I'm not sure why, maybe because of the clothing and the ropework in the logo, which reminds me a little of the High crosses, now that I think of it. To find that its set in medieval Scotland is slightly disappointing. The former would have been more original.

roushutsu:
Should Disney really continue with this kind of advertising, especially when it gives people the wrong expectations?

Unfortunately, in this day of age, all businessmen care about is the majority: if the majority likes seeing 3 triplets cause cute havoc, an firey red head not exactly showing how Badd enough she is but instead also joining in the hijinks, and craggy looking Scotsmen enjoying flashing each other, then so be it rather the minority find that style of advertising unimpressive or not.

I noticed enough commercials to notice they're were shooting for everyone though rather it works or not remains to be seen in the coming weeks.

I think part of the problem is that the movie was too short. There wasn't enough room to let the characters breath and explain things properly. More time spent learning about the four princes would have been nice.

But I like Merida. She's a great character, from her design to how she's a good older sister. I really wouldn't mind seeing a sequel somewhere down the line, and really get a chance to explore her world.

Bob, I personally found this review very helpful in experessing my own ambiguous views on the movie. In fact, wanted to let you know I taged you in my latest article at Toy-TMA.

http://www.toy-tma.com/hot-toys/anime-cartoons/korra-finale-review/

Keep up the good work.

Hey, So long as they don't mess up Wreck It Ralph, We cool Pixar.

I was disturbed by the advertising, wether that was to hide the twist or not though I'm not sure. Could just be Disney targeting too narrow an audience. The advertising does sum up the first act of the story though, as baseline as it is. The set up and reveil of the twist and everything afterwards though was absolutely fantastic.

The movie has it's Disney/Pixar flair that you come to expect, in some places more then others to the point where you'd swear this was a joke pulled from some other studio. Which I'll allow Pixar the occasional mulligan.

It's well worth it for the scenery, mythos, and the latter portions of the film.

I think what drags it down in many people is the first act, for which elements may carry over into the second and third, but the latter half certainly makes up for it in my opinion.

"the time has come for her to be married to one of the three sons of the land's three other kings" Well I think they are more like Merida's Dad's bannermen.

The different clans were actually really well researched. The Blond Vikings from the Islands of the North, the Picts covered in Blue war paint from the North East, the Brunettes who fight the Romans a lot from the central beat (where all the people live now) and Merida's family the red headed Celts from the North West. The film was very well research if nothing else.

Neino Ranatos:
I was honestly very disappointed in this movie. It had a lot of potential to do something different or at least fun and interesting that we don't see often.

Unfortunately, that was not the case. It was a good movie, but not a Pixar movie.

I share the arrow analogy, Bob. Looks like Pixar won't win the princess' hand, but it was a very good try.

And with Monsters University on the horizon, is it safe to say that Pixar's era of innovation is either ending or on a down-curve?

Agreed wholeheartedly with whats in the spoiler tag.

So is this the same effect as Tales From Earthsea, where a film studio you've known to create great pieces just shocks audiences by the inconsistency of the quality of their works?

Also, trailer for aforementioned Studio Ghibli flick:

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