The Big Picture: Silly Billy

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Silly Billy

Bob shines a light on the Clampetts and their move to California.

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Well as long as the military or government isn't involved, I guess we can trust you to read into subtext rationally.

Well that was damn interesting.

I might have to check out this series... if my grubby English hands can get ahold of it.

TV-shows reflect the culture of the era they're living in?

You don't say!?!?

Seriously though, cool vid. Never heard about the show before (European kid from the 90s).

I agree that it's kind a boring when you discuss a piece of fiction and somebody in the group says you're overanalyzing. Talk about buzzkill.

Well, I can definitely see where you're going with that, Bob, but it still doesn't explain that piano playing chicken or the fact that the Clampetts basically all had super powers. Of course, I don't need either explained, since the show is still funny fifty years later.

Good show. Now do the Waltons? I liked that one too.

Not being American myself and never having seen this show (although I have heard of it) I feel compelled to offer up a British example of a similar (and I use that term loosely) show from my country.

The Good Life.

Basically it's about a couple living in suburban London in the 1970s who give up their dull day jobs to become completely self sufficient. They generate their own power, grow their own food and keep animals all in their back garden. The simple and somewhat out-dated nature of their actions is watched with some level of bemusement from their neighbours, a married couple of great success and wealth. Comedy ensues.

Not quite the same, but I love any comedy that makes fun of a terribly archaic class system.

I remember a movie in Sessão da Tarde (a network where all crappy american family made movies went). It means afternoon hour. I think there was a movie about them or some sort. Also a Simpsons parody. You see the 60's were great for US and western Europe, for Latin America it meant the begin of a series of dictatorial regimes.

In marginally related news, I discovered the finale to Little House on the Prairie ended in a series of massive explosions like a Michael Bay wet dream...

Never heard of the show (I love the Good Life), but I do enjoy thinking about the subtext of shows. It's quite interesting what you can rationalise. Of course you must realise that it's not intended but it doesn't stop it fun exploring themes.

I remember watching the TV version of the Goosebumps book "The Haunted Mask" and I found it fascinating how horrible the children were to the main character. It heavily implies that Children can be monsters. (A boy puts a worm in the main character's sandwich and she eats it to be publicly humiliated).

The Grim Ace:
the fact that the Clampetts basically all had super powers.

And now I'm very interested in this. Could we get a follow-up episode about this?

Ahh ]The Beverly Hillbillys. Just before my grandma died she gave me a collection of those shows and I've loved em since the first episode.

I grew up in the UK in the 80's and I remember watching The Beverley Hillbillys, it was definately on over here.

Next episode: Hogan's Heroes!

I love Beverly Hillbillies, such a good show.

Well that is a point on which you and I disagree Bob. I think you can over-think and/or over analyze things. Specifically when said over analysis tends to ruin one's enjoyment of the thing in question.

Interesting theory.

Bob, at some point, you should do The Mod Squad, AKA, "Don't worry, parents! One day your hippie kids will sell out and work for the establishment!"

Somewhat related: Moff's Law: "First of all, when we analyze art, when we look for deeper meaning in it, we are enjoying it for what it is."

And there was a 60s/70s anti-consumerist movement that went beyond the hippies: the [a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Back-to-the-land_movement]Back-to-the-land movement[/a].

canadamus_prime:
Well that is a point on which you and I disagree Bob. I think you can over-think and/or over analyze things. Specifically when said over analysis tends to ruin one's enjoyment of the thing in question.

Oh no! Did the big bad cultural critic ruin your unquestioned childhood sentiment with the power of his words?

The thing I remember the most about this show was how they took a bra to create a double barrel slingshot in one episode.

Falseprophet:

canadamus_prime:
Well that is a point on which you and I disagree Bob. I think you can over-think and/or over analyze things. Specifically when said over analysis tends to ruin one's enjoyment of the thing in question.

Oh no! Did the big bad cultural critic ruin your unquestioned childhood sentiment with the power of his words?

No, I was just saying. I was never really into the Beverly Hillbilies so he can over-think that all he wants for all I care.

brazuca:
I remember a movie in Sessão da Tarde (a network where all crappy american family made movies went). It means afternoon hour. I think there was a movie about them or some sort. Also a Simpsons parody. You see the 60's were great for US and western Europe, for Latin America it meant the begin of a series of dictatorial regimes.

Yeah, I saw that movie in Sessão da Tarde, too. It was nice, but... never put too much thought on it.

I grew up watching the Beverly Hillbillies reruns. For the time it was and still is a good series. Simple comedy that even today is funny.

This show is still on some cable channels. There has been an explosion of channels running these cheap to license older TV shows lately. Mostly I think so they can get some quick cash off of running life insurance, Hoveround and Phoenix University scam college commercials all day.

One such channel runs a couple of episodes of The Beverly Hillbillys Wednesday evenings so I'll occasionally watch it. One episode a couple of weeks ago managed to slip in a marijuana joke through Jethro's inability to say "marinara sauce" correctly and wanting show up the rest of the family with his ability to speak "Italian" after hiring a temp cook who was a hot Italian chick.

Uncle Jed: Jethro, why don't you pass over that there red gravy.

Jethro: That's not red gravy Uncle Jed. That there's what they call marijuana sauce.

The movie is a classic here in mexico anyone in their 20s knows it. The series is another story.

Fun fact about me that I doubt anyone will care about. When I was a baby my dad would sing me the Beverly Hillbillies song over and over again until I went to sleep.

Grew up watching reruns of this and I can't think of a single episode that I didn't laugh.

Over analyzing pop culture is a great thing, but many people who do it tend to ask the wrong questions. Any piece of pop culture can have as many interpretations as the number of people who experience it and I don't mean that most of those interpretations are wrong, but many times people will simply bend their reasoning (and many times logic) to suit the answer they've already decided on, cherry picking examples that support their hypothesis and rejecting those that don't. It isn't so much analyzing as it is rationalizing.

That being said, I never watched the Beverly Hillbillies (way before my time) so I have no idea whether or not Bob is blowing smoke or right on the money. It's an interesting idea but it's hard to know if that's what the original creators had intended. Still, if it your increases your enjoyment of the material than that's all a creator can ask for.

The Beverly Hillbillies are probably limited to specialized channels now for old sitcoms. You're more likely to see it in the middle of the day if it was referenced on the Simpsons.

image

Very entertaining bob.

I still quote from this series--mostly revolving around Jethro's 6th grade education (the highest in the family).

Jed: "Jethro give us some go-zin-tas!"
Jethro: "Two go-zin-ta two once. Two go-zin-ta 4 twice. Two goz-in-ta six three times."
Jed: "Weeeeellllll doggies!"

From Wikipedia, which I didnt' recall: The tallest student in his class in the town of Oxford (so named because "that's where the oxen used to ford the creek") because of his age, he is often impressing others that he graduated "top of his class at Oxford."

274 episdoes can't be wrong. The series did well enough to get it's own movie in 1993.

Bob, I'm really glad you specified that the points you made weren't necessarily the intent of the show's creators. I think a key difference between over-analysis and and good analysis is the difference between "what was the author really trying to say" and "what can we learn from it." This was firmly the latter. It doesn't so much matter what was in their minds while they made the show. Rather, our reaction to it is what determines its place in culture and history. I never thought of BHB as anything more than silly fluff. Very interesting take on it.

This show fills me with...happiness

Well from a UK perspective the only thing we saw was the 1993 movie of the same name, wasnt too good as I remember.

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0106400/

Electromagnet:

The Grim Ace:
the fact that the Clampetts basically all had super powers.

And now I'm very interested in this. Could we get a follow-up episode about this?

Meh, I'm not sure what he's on about. Jethro was enormously strong, yes, but Granny, Jed and Ellie May didn't have any "superpowers" to speak of.

OT: I LOVED THIS SHOW AS A KID! :D

I knew the name, and got the pun, but never saw the show.

In the Netherlands, we had our own version with the movies and TV show Flodder. The titular Flodder family weren't farmers, but, well, white trash would be the closest comparison, who got to live in a generic high-class neighbourhood when the city council found out their old home was on top of a toxic waste dump. There were some differences, mostly in that unlike the Beverly Hillbillies the Flodders, particularly the oldest son and 'protagonist' Jonny, were small-time criminals. And rather than any overly honest or practical mentality, it was often their crooked schemes that got the plot rolling. But what it does have in common is that while the show did portray them as crooks, they tended to more sympathetic than their upper-class neighbours. They tended to be a lot more relatable than the hypocritic and posh people who surrounded them, especially in the movies.

If you wanted more comedy behind their simplistic ideals, you should have brought up Elly's lace trimmed double barreled slingshot (aka, her bra).

Again, this is something I've been saying for a while. Jed was loaded, but always more than willing to help and give his money away and pay his taxes. He avoided using servants. He kept a movie studio around even his banker bought it for the land to build condos. Hell he was once willing to donate millions directly to the government in the name of fighting smog. As long as Jed could hunt, farm, and whittle with good company, and maybe some of Ganny's "rhumitism medicine" he didn't need money. He was rich enough. Take that 1%ers. Here's the guy you like to think you are.

Okay, some plots were gimmicky, and a lot of the last season was painful, but I still have a soft spot for it.

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